You May Not Own that Digital Comic, Son

Disclaimer: This article does not constitute legal advice. This is merely information conveyed that is apparent from reading publicly available contracts.

I did a practice run at this topic a while back as I prepared for a paper. This is a more reader-friendly version of that content.

Can't really sit on the fence with this issue.

We have all heard the debates on physical comics versus digital comics. Some, like myself, are nostalgic and wish to keep the books to pass on to future generations. Some, like my brother, are modern and love having a good issue to read on the go and on almost any device.

Turning the page or swiping the screen?

The smell of print or the joy of built-in soundtracks?

Paper cuts or strained eyes?

We’ve heard the debates – we’ve even had them within our own brains – but now it is time to look at the issue from a different light: Legal.

I am a soon-to-graduate law student at the University of Wyoming. My interest in the law came about because I wanted to learn to protect the rights of artists, I having been a recovering bass player. As you might imagine, any university based in Wyoming is not going to have a strong intellectual property program. Why would they? Sheep don’t make art. But I was lucky enough to have a professor that was interested in IP law and he let me do an Independent Study in which I wrote on digital ownership rights. It was a long, boring paper (only unsexy lawyers find long, boring law papers sexy) but it pretty much amounted to this: Under current practice, the majority of you don’t own your digital comics.

Taylor Swift is totally photo-bombing my Marvel example. It's not always about you, sweetheart.

Let me repeat that: Under current practice, the majority of you don’t own your digital comics. Like, at all. (I hope you used your best Taylor Swift voice for that last line.)

I’ll make Marvel an example. I am enjoying the newest run of Uncanny X-Force. It’s different and in a very good way. Let’s pretend I can’t make it to my local comic shop (Heroes Only in Cheyenne) and I decide that I can’t wait any longer. I jump on Marvel.com to download the last issue. Perhaps I don’t notice it, but there is a link on the bottom of the page that says “Use of this website signifies your agreement to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy.” Using the site (like downloading sweet Uncanny X-Force comics) shows that I agree to the Terms and Conditions of the site automatically. Marvel.com does not have to require a signature for this type of contract; simply using the site shows my acquiescence to the rules of the site.

So what does this mean as I purchase the new Uncanny X-Force? The very first term in your objectively agreed-to contract is that Marvel.com retains all rights to the property that the consumer is accessing/downloading.

“Your use of the Web Site does not grant to you ownership of any content, code, data or materials you may access on the Web Site.” (Term 1, emphasis added.)

Then what do I get, the loyal Uncanny X-Force downloader? A “limited license.” I may use the content for my own “personal, internal use” only.

“The Web Site and the services offered on or through the Web Site, including any content and materials thereon, are only for your personal, non-commercial use.” (Term 2.)

By “purchasing” a digital comic you are actually contracting to only have a limited license to use the content. My Uncanny X-Force is only to be used by me. I can never legally sell the right to that digital issue.

It's a great deal, unless you don't think so...

This opens up many issues for debate:

  • Why does the site say I’m purchasing issues? Isn’t that misleading?
  • Why can they charge the same amount for a digital issue as a physical one when no limitations are placed on physical copies (as in, you own that book)?
  • Does this actually help or hinder anti-piracy policies?
  • What is the legality of simply giving your device’s password to a friend or relative?

The sad thing is that this is pretty standard right now across all forms of media. Music, books, games, and so on, are typically limited when bought digitally. Does this detract from your desire to “purchase” digital comics? Some say there is no price for convenience. (Actually, I just made that up.) Digital comics ownership is nothing to some because flexibility is worth any price. Some, like me, hate that my money goes to nothing more than a glorified private viewing of the comic. Give me my physical books. Give me actual ownership.

A look at other contracts for digital content will show similar things to the Marvel example, like Comixology. Very few contracts actually allow digital ownership. Check your digital contract out to see the status of ownership on what is in your digital queue.

Source: http://marvel.com/corporate/terms

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Posted by WaveMotionCannon

Wow! That's crazy, there needs to be an explanation for them being able to charge the same amount as buying a physical copy that you actually own.

Online
Posted by impossibilly

Wow! That's crazy, there needs to be an explanation for them being able to charge the same amount as buying a physical copy that you actually own.

I think the explanation is simply, "People will pay." That's the a reason most of Marvel's line is $3.99 and its digital comics cost the same price. If Marvel raised their prices and sales tanked, or if no one was willing to pay $3.99 for a digital comic, we would see a rollback in prices. But as long as buyers keep buying after every price increase, and digital buyers keep buying despite the print price being equal, Marvel will keep raising prices and charge the same for digital issues.

I highly recommend reading Sean Howe's Marvel Comics: The Untold Story. He goes into detail on the price increases of the 80s through today, and how they've vastly outpaced production costs and inflation. It's all about the profit.

Posted by Renchamp

@impossibilly: Sounds like an interesting read. I may have to check that out after graduation.

Posted by RazzaTazz

So let me say first of all that I save my Taylor Swift voice solely for when I am singing along to Taylor Swift songs (though we don't sound very much alike.)

Let me give my perspective as a Canadian and how this might be affected by that. As far as I understand it, copyright law in Canada is different from that in the USA. In the USA all broadcasted signals are the property of the originator, but in Canada the material is only owned by the broadcaster until it is broadcast. Furthermore in Canada most forms of the internet also count as broadcasts, so if you buy a comic on your computer or on your phone then it still counts as a broadcast. To counteract this companies and generally do encrypt their broadcast materials, especially in such cases. In this case the encryption key is also copyrighted where the signal is not, thus giving rights still to the signal. Still in terms of what Marvel in this case is doing, is that it seems to be taking that one step further and saying that regardless of other restrictions that it still owns whatever material it is that is on your device. From what I understand from copyright law, this would already be unnecessary in the USA as it never really stopped owning the material at all. This is similar in to how a movie is released on a disk, but the individual still does not have really any rights to it except to broadcast it individually or without charge to others. So from my perspective it would seem that such an approach would be more for the international market of Marvel as opposed to domestic. Under these guidelines, they can still easily pursue legal channels for the illegal distribution of copyright materials. This might be a concern for them. I have no idea how illegal comic downloads are created, but I imagine that it is much easier to copy them off of an electronic device as opposed to scanning them in manually. This is probably an attempt to control such illegal activities.

Moderator
Edited by Renchamp

@razzatazz: In the U.S., once a physical item is sold, like a comic book, then it belongs to the buyer. I can physically buy Uncanny X-Force and gift it, sell, or store it forever, unless the store owner makes me sign away my rights to the book. Digitally, however, gets that contract in there before you even buy the issue. You can't give it away or sell it. You can only store it until you die and then the publisher is able to basically reclaim that right (though I don't know how they'd actually enforce this).

Essentially, a contract takes away basic copyright laws. You can contract for almost anything. We let this happen because we sign the contract by using the services.

Posted by RazzaTazz

@renchamp: Aren't there some restrictions actually in the reselling of books? I seem to remember there being some debate in Canada over this.

I get that about the copyright laws, but it works different for the electronic medium I think. If a person can figure out how to rebroadcast a comic they could send thousands of copies in a minute. Whereas a person sharing a paper comic is more limited. The contract is likely based with that interest in mind, that it is impossible to copy a paper book (or at least quite difficult) but rather simple to cope an e-book.

Moderator
Posted by Renchamp

@razzatazz: We have no limits on reselling books. If you bought the book then you can sell it. It's the same with all goods that are not restricted by licensing contracts (like CDs and magazines). Now, you can't make copies to sell and keep the original. That's theft and copyright infringement.

As to digital stuff, like you said, most digital products are encoded. If copies are made and the government gets wise to it, they can read the code and find the originator very easily. I don't know if this actually happens all that often, but the tools are in place to enforce this.

Edited by Aiden Cross

Yup. As you said pretty much the same thing for all digital products. I think in time, when more and more people go digital the laws will be 'adjusted' again though. It's just that many people don't realize it now so they won't complain. Once the masses finds out and start complaining, things will change. Similar with what happened with Instagram and their change of policy.

Posted by RazzaTazz

@renchamp: If I remember correctly the debate had something to do whether royalties should apply to resold materials, like if artists still deserved royalties from their material being resold (though I am pretty sure the answer was no).

I suppose so, I mean I have some questions about how that might be possible. It must be possible to copy them somehow and thus remove the encoding. I think Marvel is just trying to cover its bases, but is also willing to treat itself more like a business and less like an artistic venture. The problem with that is that it does alienate some fans (though most don't care)

Moderator
Edited by Renchamp

@aiden_cross: What happened with Instagram? Did they claim some kind of ownership right for pictures uploaded to their database?

@razzatazz: The policy on reselling is that it is okay (where not contracted away) because we are supposed to be furthering the arts while not burdening anybody with the task of keeping track of how many times a book has been resold. (Can you imagine what a headache that would be, especially for a book with massive, world-wide circulation?) Digital copyright is certainly being treated as business whose interest is before the convenience a wider exposure, which should theoretically get more people interested.

Posted by Aiden Cross

@Renchamp Well not exactly, the changed their terms so they could use any and all uploaded pictures for advertising purposes. It had a major backlash. You can read it here, quite interesting :)

http://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2013/01/15/instagram-sheds-more-than-half-its-daily-users-new-report-contends

Edited by sagejonathan

This is the first blog I ever really read with deep interest. Good job.

Posted by Renchamp

@aiden_cross said:

@Renchamp Well not exactly, the changed their terms so they could use any and all uploaded pictures for advertising purposes. It had a major backlash. You can read it here, quite interesting :)

http://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2013/01/15/instagram-sheds-more-than-half-its-daily-users-new-report-contends

Interesting. I love how brazen Facebook has been in trying to push the envelope on privacy breaches. Why would anyone be okay with any picture uploaded to be used in advertising? I'm hoping that digital comics eventually get a similar backlash, especially since digital anything is becoming such a popular and convenient way to purchase things you love. (Did I say purchase? I of course meant lease...)

Posted by RazzaTazz

@renchamp said:

@aiden_cross said:

@Renchamp Well not exactly, the changed their terms so they could use any and all uploaded pictures for advertising purposes. It had a major backlash. You can read it here, quite interesting :)

http://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2013/01/15/instagram-sheds-more-than-half-its-daily-users-new-report-contends

Interesting. I love how brazen Facebook has been in trying to push the envelope on privacy breaches. Why would anyone be okay with any picture uploaded to be used in advertising? I'm hoping that digital comics eventually get a similar backlash, especially since digital anything is becoming such a popular and convenient way to purchase things you love. (Did I say purchase? I of course meant lease...)

I got off of facebook years ago because of that. I am not big on being "out there" in terms of content.

Moderator
Edited by Aiden Cross

@renchamp said:

@aiden_cross said:

@Renchamp Well not exactly, the changed their terms so they could use any and all uploaded pictures for advertising purposes. It had a major backlash. You can read it here, quite interesting :)

http://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2013/01/15/instagram-sheds-more-than-half-its-daily-users-new-report-contends

Interesting. I love how brazen Facebook has been in trying to push the envelope on privacy breaches. Why would anyone be okay with any picture uploaded to be used in advertising? I'm hoping that digital comics eventually get a similar backlash, especially since digital anything is becoming such a popular and convenient way to purchase things you love. (Did I say purchase? I of course meant lease...)

Most people wouldn't, but that's why Instagram changed the terms without notifying the public. If the announced they were sure to get comments about it, so they tried to sneak it past. I doubt they expected the huge back lash though!

Posted by impossibilly
@renchamp said:

@impossibilly: Sounds like an interesting read. I may have to check that out after graduation.

It quickly became one of my favorite books written about the comics industry. I can't recommend that, or Kirby: King of Comics, enough. Both are extremely fascinating.

Edited by Renchamp

@sagejonathan said:

This is the first blog I ever really read with deep interest. Good job.

I need to make a poster of this statement and put it over my desk. Glad you enjoyed it.

Posted by AllStarSuperman

I honesty will never buy digital comics. I find it stupid. First I like to hold and enjoy the art. Second you don't really own anything. And third its a way for companys to make money with actually giving you anything. Fourth they have no resell value.

Edited by lykopis

I remember when you first put out a blog about this and I am happy you put it out again -- it amazes me how many people fail to consider the implications and importance of what digital ownership really is.

Give me my physical books. Give me actual ownership.

So true. I can't see myself giving up on my tactile comics (or books) although I do have some in digital form for convenience sake. In Canada, we have Bill C-11 which brings up copyright laws to modern standards, specifically for digital products. A few crucial points were to have creators dictate how their first issue property is sold (this excludes re-sale although in the digital sense, it becomes a moot issue outside of collector books and works of art, etc. As it stands now, ownership is ownership and resale is allowed without input from the creator). It also allows creators to put on "digital locks" on their property, the right to pursue legal action when their property is being shared illegally on a peer-to-peer file sharing website.

There is the standard law in that a person is allowed to make an MP3 file of a CD, video - etc and the following:

"Fair dealing is a long-standing feature of Canadian copyright law that permits certain uses of copyright material in ways that do not unduly threaten the interests of copyright owners, but which could have significant social benefits — but only if they are fair.

Fair dealing is not a blank cheque. Currently, fair dealing in Canada is limited to five purposes: research, private study, news reporting, criticism and review. To recognize the important societal benefits of education, parody and satire, the proposed Bill would add these three elements as new purposes to which fair dealing applies."

Things are getting icky though. This is also being implemented once the C-11 has completed its now assured passage through parliament.

"The Bill establishes that ISPs and search engines are exempt from liability when they act strictly as intermediaries in communication, caching and hosting activities.

In Canada, courts have the ability to order the blocking of access to infringing material. Under the new Bill, ISPs will be required to discourage infringing uses of their facilities by participating in a "notice and notice" regime, which will require them to forward any notice they receive from a copyright owner to a subscriber who is alleged to be engaging in infringing activities. Additionally, ISPs will be required to retain a record of this notification, including the identity of the alleged infringer, for use if court proceedings were to follow."

(source)

Back on topic, lol -- I do think this is very important for people to make note of. If I paid for something, I want to own it. I did not buy access to comics online - I paid for the actual property and as things stand now on sites like Marvel -- that isn't quite the case.

Thanks again for putting a spotlight on this. Great blog.

Edited by Renchamp

@lykopis: Interesting stuff. The sad thing is that the law doesn't move as fast as technology does.

Posted by Ellie_Knightfall

This is the ONLY reason why I still read print comics.

Posted by johnkmccubbin91

Good points, I already had a good idea about this, as I know there's something to do with not having much ownership over download material including music, buts still a very valid point, and a good thing for anyone that doesn't know these things.

Edited by Mucklefluga

@renchamp Great post dude, very very interesting. A couple days ago i was thinking of swapping a couple of physical comics on my pull list to digital since it would be much better for me in different ways but this post has made me a lot more hesitant.

Posted by ccraft

@renchamp: Its not necessarily a bad thing of not being able to have ownership over digital comics is it? It's pretty like Itunes right? And I don't think they abuse there customers. (Well I had a bad experience with them before, lost all of my movies, around $50 worth too.)

Is there a reason why they don't let you have ownership of the digital comics? Sure I get why they block the copy and paste, to prevent piracy. But, come on, you can scan paper comics and post it online.

Great post btw, I was very much interested in it because I'm a digital reader, and I wanted to know a few of the bad things from being one.

Posted by Renchamp

@ccraft: It's not a bad thing if you don't mind one way or the other. I am just one who likes to know one's boundaries.

As to why digital things aren't yet ownable (totally made up word): I think it is largely due to the fact that no uniform way exists to regulate the resale of digital items. And the sad truth is that the law moves at a snail's pace where technology is concerned. So even though there are arguments on both sides as to how things should be done with digital products, it isn't until Congress makes a law or the courts pass judgement on a case before the law becomes clear. Both options could take years, and by then the law is obsolete since technology will be far beyond where we are now.

Posted by lorex

Nice article. The fact of the matter is digital distribution of media is not going anywhere and the issue of consumer rights needs to be addressed. I think there needs to be more disclosure from the sellers that when you are purchasing a digital copy of a comic you do not infact own it but have in a sence rented it and according the the terms of service are not allowed to transfer it to another person.

Edited by ccraft

@renchamp: So true. I try not to let it bother me, but I'd feel better if it was actually mine. I didn't know this until after I started buying comics on cmx. But there is a lot of things I like about it, especially how cheap they sell it after a couple of months. That's one of my reason for switching, money.

What will comixology do if you give your account info to another person? And could they even tell?

Edited by rantanplan1980

@ccraft said:

@renchamp: So true. I try not to let it bother me, but I'd feel better if it was actually mine. I didn't know this until after I started buying comics on cmx. But there is a lot of things I like about it, especially how cheap they sell it after a couple of months. That's one of my reason for switching, money.

What will comixology do if you give your account info to another person? And could they even tell?

Also no ads on comixology!

I don't think they'd be able to tell. I use comixology on my iPad, my girlfriends iPhone and my Windows Phone and I never got any complains. Still, it's probably a license infringement.

Edited by Renchamp

@lorex said:

Nice article. The fact of the matter is digital distribution of media is not going anywhere and the issue of consumer rights needs to be addressed. I think there needs to be more disclosure from the sellers that when you are purchasing a digital copy of a comic you do not infact own it but have in a sence rented it and according the the terms of service are not allowed to transfer it to another person.

The way they see it, they have done everything according to law to let you know the terms (by that small link at the bottom of the page) and the law typically agrees. With the digital trend, however, something will have to be done.

@ccraft said:

What will comixology do if you give your account info to another person? And could they even tell?

No clue. That's one of the cases that will have to be brought and could ultimately decide where the courts lie in regards to what is allowed with digital sales. My guess, however, is that they'd just cancel your account which would take away your use of the digital comics you've "purchased."

Edited by End_Boss

@razzatazz said:

So let me say first of all that I save my Taylor Swift voice solely for when I am singing along to Taylor Swift songs (though we don't sound very much alike.)

I am only interested in this thread as a vehicle to express my disappointment. Which is severe.

Posted by ManlyScream

This will surely become an issue more if/when sites like Comixology or Amazon go out of business and there is a multitude of content that will no longer be accessible. Plus, adding in the ability to use things on the 'cloud', it takes even your virtual, downloaded copy gone until you can access the internet.

Personally I always think of this whenever I buy things digitally, but then again we live in a world where things are reliant on devices that need to be used to access this content...so even then, if the people providing the content are still around, but the hardware manufacturer goes out of business or you break it, you are at a total loss again until you find something that can be substituted....

Edited by Xwraith

This is why I like to have a print version of every digital comic I have (even though 90% of the ones I do have are "bonus digital editions").

Edited by Renchamp

@manlyscream said:

This will surely become an issue more if/when sites like Comixology or Amazon go out of business and there is a multitude of content that will no longer be accessible. Plus, adding in the ability to use things on the 'cloud', it takes even your virtual, downloaded copy gone until you can access the internet.

Personally I always think of this whenever I buy things digitally, but then again we live in a world where things are reliant on devices that need to be used to access this content...so even then, if the people providing the content are still around, but the hardware manufacturer goes out of business or you break it, you are at a total loss again until you find something that can be substituted....

My concern is when digital becomes the only way to do things. Physical music and book sales are already predominantly digital. If the law doesn't act soon then we could be contracting our rights away for years to come before any recourse is taken. The point about businesses failing is valid, however, and a point I hadn't considered. Good on you, mate.

@xwraith said:

This is why I like to have a print version of every digital comic I have (even though 90% of the ones I do have are "bonus digital editions").

I'm in a similar boat. I only have freebies (which I don't consider mine) and copies gained from codes from purchased books. Love me some physical issues.

Posted by BlueLantern1995

A very eye opening article and without a doubt the best I've read on the site. So basically all those digital downloads are nothing more than a glorified permament rental. This issue needs to be addressed soon. However there are certain advantages to downloading like if there is a fire then you don't have to worry about getting your downloads burned and lost and have to re purchase them(and they won't get musty like some old books I've Seen).

One easy solution I can see is something like this account can only access this.Thus making the person's account the one that owns the thing and not the actual person allowing for lets say, the giving the account in a will after death. Or gift wrapping the account for the person(so to speak). Is this legally permissible or even possible?

Edited by Reignmaker

@renchamp said:

The sad thing is that this is pretty standard right now across all forms of media. Music, books, games, and so on, are typically limited when bought digitally. Does this detract from your desire to “purchase” digital comics? Some say there is no price for convenience. (Actually, I just made that up.) Digital comics ownership is nothing to some because flexibility is worth any price. Some, like me, hate that my money goes to nothing more than a glorified private viewing of the comic. Give me my physical books. Give me actual ownership.

The fact that the legal language is similar for digital music, books, and games makes me feel much better about my purchases. Pretty sure the backlash would be tremendous if Comixology up and closed shop, saying "thank you for your money." As cloud-based storage becomes more prevalent, I look for this to become more normal as time goes on. My house is empty, because I got the Kindle for my books, Amazon video store for my movies, Battle.net for my games, and Comixology for my comics. Music I usually just stream on Spotify.

All that being said, the pricing is out of control. There's no way in hell that digital comics should be $4 an issue. The pricing needs to come down at least by half. Digital-only issues seem to be much more reasonable in this regard.

Posted by Renchamp

@bluelantern1995 said:

A very eye opening article and without a doubt the best I've read on the site. So basically all those digital downloads are nothing more than a glorified permament rental. This issue needs to be addressed soon. However there are certain advantages to downloading like if there is a fire then you don't have to worry about getting your downloads burned and lost and have to re purchase them(and they won't get musty like some old books I've Seen).

One easy solution I can see is something like this account can only access this.Thus making the person's account the one that owns the thing and not the actual person allowing for lets say, the giving the account in a will after death. Or gift wrapping the account for the person(so to speak). Is this legally permissible or even possible?

I am humbled at your praise of the content. Thanks!

As to your question: Anything legal is possible with contracts. We currently contract the right to claim a limited licence (or life-long lease) and forfeit any rights to actual ownership by going digital. This means we can't gift it or give it away in a will. The contracts typically say that the license you get is non-transferable. This will have to be changed in the future if we go purely digital because these forfeited rights will eventually fly in the face of fair use when copyrights expire.

Edited by NeoSpeedForce

I hope nothing ever makes me steer toward the digital download. I try to support my local comic book store in buying printed material.

Edited by kilomac29

This has become a hotly debated issue with the proliferation of digital media. It sparked a huge discussion in my Estates & Trusts class about whether you should be able to pass ownership of your digital library to your descendants/heirs upon your death. As the author stated, since you are only receiving a limited license to use the content you can't pass that license on to your heirs when you die.

I believe U.S. copyright law will begin to advance more quickly because of these types of issues. Also, the ease in hacking DRM software and major retailers like Amazon, who are considering measures to make it easier for consumers to exchange digital content, (digital swap meets) will force lawmakers to reconsider the current U.S. copyright laws.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/08/technology/revolution-in-the-resale-of-digital-books-and-music.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Hopefully, along with reconsideration of current copyright law, they will consider the rights of consumers. Hopefully, it will force digital retailers (Amazon, Apple, Marvel, etc.) to make their Terms of Service more consumer friendly, and less one-sided. Probably a pipe dream, but if there is enough consumer backlash, (see Instagram example above) maybe consumers can finally take ownership of what is rightfully theirs.

Great blog post about an interesting topic!

Posted by Onemoreposter

Hmm interesting. Good article.

Posted by SHTR

Great blog post. I wish more people were aware of this. I bet their perception on digital comics would change dramatically.

Posted by Joygirl

@RazzaTazz: Yeah, but in Canada, milk comes in bags. Anyway, great blog, engaging and informative.

Posted by Joygirl

@RazzaTazz: Yeah, but in Canada, milk comes in bags. Anyway, great blog, engaging and informative.

Posted by Renchamp

@joygirl said:

@RazzaTazz: Yeah, but in Canada, milk comes in bags. Anyway, great blog, engaging and informative.

Five Iron Frenzy has a song that lists all the other gag reasons that Canada is awesome. Or maybe they aren't gags...

Posted by fantasyfreak

As I live in Sweden, digital is the only way I CAN buy single issues and I´m perfectly fine with that. I usually prefer trades anyway. But of course this isnt optimal, and eventually they probably will change it. Question is, if they will do it in time?

Edited by rantanplan1980

This will surely become an issue more if/when sites like Comixology or Amazon go out of business and there is a multitude of content that will no longer be accessible. Plus, adding in the ability to use things on the 'cloud', it takes even your virtual, downloaded copy gone until you can access the internet.

Personally I always think of this whenever I buy things digitally, but then again we live in a world where things are reliant on devices that need to be used to access this content...so even then, if the people providing the content are still around, but the hardware manufacturer goes out of business or you break it, you are at a total loss again until you find something that can be substituted....

Amazons AZW format is already hacked and can be converted to epub or any other format that calibre supports.
And since comixology (the flash player) caches the jpgs in your local browser cache you can simply grab the files. A script might help though.

It's probably illegal but if you want to backup your digital comic collection you can. What bugs me is that it's actually easier to just pirate those comics than create a legit backup.

Posted by Renchamp

@rantanplan1980 said:

@manlyscream said:

This will surely become an issue more if/when sites like Comixology or Amazon go out of business and there is a multitude of content that will no longer be accessible. Plus, adding in the ability to use things on the 'cloud', it takes even your virtual, downloaded copy gone until you can access the internet.

Personally I always think of this whenever I buy things digitally, but then again we live in a world where things are reliant on devices that need to be used to access this content...so even then, if the people providing the content are still around, but the hardware manufacturer goes out of business or you break it, you are at a total loss again until you find something that can be substituted....

Amazons AZW format is already hacked and can be converted to epub or any other format that calibre supports.

And since comixology (the flash player) caches the jpgs in your local browser cache you can simply grab the files. A script might help though.

It's probably illegal but if you want to backup your digital comic collection you can. What bugs me is that it's actually easier to just pirate those comics than create a legit backup.

That's what gets me. Part of this contracting away of rights is to limit pirating. But it also encourages it.

Posted by Queso6p4

This confirms what I assumed. Thanks for spelling this out, though.

Posted by turoksonofstone

Let me repeat that: Under current practice, the majority of you don’t own your digital comics. Like, at all. (I hope you used your best Taylor Swift voice for that last line.)

http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lka915sLrA1qhgme2.gif

Posted by turoksonofstone

http://30.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lrezzhHjpp1qf2fu4o1_400.gif

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