#1 Posted by Racob7 (5887 posts) - - Show Bio

I'm kinda new here and was wondering if anyone could help me learn what abreiviations like OP and PIS stand for?

#2 Posted by lightsout (1831 posts) - - Show Bio

OP = original poster. PIS = plot induced stupidity (aka: someone won or something happened solely b/c the writer made it so, to make the story "work")

#3 Edited by JonSmith (3996 posts) - - Show Bio

OP = Original Poster or Overpowered. Generally depends on the context. If they're referring to the conditions of the thread, it's generally referring to the original poster, the one who made the thread. If they're referring to a superpower or superperson, then it's overpowered, meaning it's so incredibly powerful it renders opponents irrelevant.

PIS = Plot induced stupidity. Meaning, if a character in a story has the ability or displayed power to wrap the story up in a few moments, but doesn't so the plot can continue, then it's PIS. What is and isn't PIS can get pretty iffy at the best of times, but there are a few instances where almost everyone agrees on it.

WIS = Writer Induced Stupidty. Same basic thing as PIS, only instead of not using their power to wrap it up because of the plot needing them not to, this is when a writer just straight up forgets that they can do that. For example, if Spidey were, say, shot by a bullet, despite him having a spider-sense that allows him to easily avoid such things, then that's WIS.

CIS = Character Induced Stupidity. Meaning the character may have the power to wrap it up, but they lack the intelligence to do so. Such as if Hulk COULD put out a fire with a thunderclap, but doesn't because he forgets he can do that.

Bloodlusted = Characters are fighting without holding back, filled with bloodlust to kill their opponent. Usually used to remove restrictions on characters for the purposes of a Battle. For example, usually Superman wouldn't be out to kill someone. When a battle with him in it stipulates bloodlust, then Superman will be doing all he can to kill the opponent.

Morals on = Obvious: The characters are acting with the same morals they have in the comic. To use the above example, this is Superman with the same morals as usual, no killing, protect innocents, etc. Usually interchangeable with 'in-character'.

BFR = Battle Field Removal. Referring to the ability to remove their opponent from the battlefield or the battlefield from the opponent. An example of this would be Nightcrawler teleporting someone away from the battlefield. 'no BFR' means they're not allowed to do stuff like that.

Any other questions?

#4 Posted by TheAmazingImmortalMan (3316 posts) - - Show Bio

@JonSmith said:

OP = Original Poster or Overpowered. Generally depends on the context. If they're referring to the conditions of the thread, it's generally referring to the original poster, the one who made the thread. If they're referring to a superpower or superperson, then it's overpowered, meaning it's so incredibly powerful it renders opponents irrelevant.

PIS = Plot induced stupidity. Meaning, if a character in a story has the ability or displayed power to wrap the story up in a few moments, but doesn't so the plot can continue, then it's PIS. What is and isn't PIS can get pretty iffy at the best of times, but there are a few instances where almost everyone agrees on it.

WIS = Writer Induced Stupidty. Same basic thing as PIS, only instead of not using their power to wrap it up because of the plot needing them not to, this is when a writer just straight up forgets that they can do that. For example, if Spidey were, say, shot by a bullet, despite him having a spider-sense that allows him to easily avoid such things, then that's WIS.

CIS = Character Induced Stupidity. Meaning the character may have the power to wrap it up, but they lack the intelligence to do so. Such as if Hulk COULD put out a fire with a thunderclap, but doesn't because he forgets he can do that.

Bloodlusted = Characters are fighting without holding back, filled with bloodlust to kill their opponent. Usually used to remove restrictions on characters for the purposes of a Battle. For example, usually Superman wouldn't be out to kill someone. When a battle with him in it stipulates bloodlust, then Superman will be doing all he can to kill the opponent.

Morals on = Obvious: The characters are acting with the same morals they have in the comic. To use the above example, this is Superman with the same morals as usual, no killing, protect innocents, etc. Usually interchangeable with 'in-character'.

BFR = Battle Field Removal. Referring to the ability to remove their opponent from the battlefield or the battlefield from the opponent. An example of this would be Nightcrawler teleporting someone away from the battlefield. 'no BFR' means they're not allowed to do stuff like that.

Any other questions?

yes, how much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

#5 Posted by JonSmith (3996 posts) - - Show Bio

@TheAmazingImmortalMan said:

Any other questions?

yes, how much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

See here.

#6 Posted by TheAmazingImmortalMan (3316 posts) - - Show Bio

@JonSmith: lmao........you just have an answer for everything don't you

#7 Posted by JonSmith (3996 posts) - - Show Bio

@TheAmazingImmortalMan said:

lmao........you just have an answer for everything don't you

I have the internet.

So yeah, pretty much.

#8 Posted by JediXMan (30881 posts) - - Show Bio

@TheAmazingImmortalMan said:

yes, how much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

He would cut a quart of conifer if he got a quarter for every quart he cut.

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#9 Posted by Racob7 (5887 posts) - - Show Bio

@JonSmith: Yes. What's a gauntlet?

#10 Posted by JonSmith (3996 posts) - - Show Bio

@Racob7 said:

Yes. What's a gauntlet?

Depends on the context: It can either be an armored glove, usually covering the forearm in addition to the hand. Or it can refer to a form of punishment, wherein the victim runs between two rows of soldiers who strike him repeatedly while he attempts to make it through.

#11 Posted by JediXMan (30881 posts) - - Show Bio

@JonSmith said:

@Racob7 said:

Yes. What's a gauntlet?

Depends on the context: It can either be an armored glove, usually covering the forearm in addition to the hand. Or it can refer to a form of punishment, wherein the victim runs between two rows of soldiers who strike him repeatedly while he attempts to make it through.

Or, in the context of a battle, repeated fights that increase in difficulty. Sometimes, character fatigue is taken into account.

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#12 Posted by Racob7 (5887 posts) - - Show Bio

@JonSmith said:

@Racob7 said:

Yes. What's a gauntlet?

Depends on the context: It can either be an armored glove, usually covering the forearm in addition to the hand. Or it can refer to a form of punishment, wherein the victim runs between two rows of soldiers who strike him repeatedly while he attempts to make it through.

I knew the glove part but the punishment method I did not know... facinating!

#13 Posted by JonSmith (3996 posts) - - Show Bio

@JediXMan said:

@Racob7 said:

Yes. What's a gauntlet?

Depends on the context: It can either be an armored glove, usually covering the forearm in addition to the hand. Or it can refer to a form of punishment, wherein the victim runs between two rows of soldiers who strike him repeatedly while he attempts to make it through.

Or, in the context of a battle, repeated fights that increase in difficulty. Sometimes, character fatigue is taken into account.

Oh, right. This is probably what you meant, Racob. I said the first thing that came to mind. My bad. Jedi's answer is the right one if you're still wondering about battle terms.