What do you love about the X-men and why?

#1 Posted by YoungWiccan (10 posts) - - Show Bio

Is there a specific someone that makes you like the x-men, or is there something about them? Tell me what you think

#2 Edited by Xwraith (18329 posts) - - Show Bio

I can think of three main reasons:

1. They were the first superhero team I ever really got into.

2. The wide diversity in characters.

3. The ability to incorporate almost anything into the mythos (aliens, time travel, ninjas, etc.)

#3 Posted by sj_esposito (457 posts) - - Show Bio

Growing up in the 90s, the X-Men cartoon meant a great deal to me. As a kid, I'd watch it religiously on Saturday mornings, but it wasn't until it was airing on rerun a few years later in the afternoons that I really got into it and, by extension, comics. I guess because I was a bit older by this time--I think it was around 2000, so I was about 13--the themes started to hit home for me. X-Men comics were the first that I bought 'seriously' and I just got sucked into the whole universe from then on out. Actually, if I really think about the timeline of events, what really kept my early comic book buying going was the fact that I used to RP in X-Men chats that were hosted on AOL. I made a whole bunch of online friends who were all X-Men fans and it was how I looked forward to spending my free time as a kid.

Over the years, my comic reading hobby has obviously expanded, and there was a period about 3 years ago where I'd almost completely pulled myself out of buying the X-books (I didn't like the creative direction things were going and got absorbed into DC for a while), but I always kept going back to the mutants. I don't know what it is, and I've given it considerable thought before, only to come up with the answer that it must not be one thing that anchors me to the X-Men, but a combination of so many things that I love about the characters and the universe they inhabit.

For sure one of the things that I always took comfort in--and still do--is the aspect of the school and the community that it fosters. I had a tough time socially in school as a kid, and for me, I always felt that reading about my favorite characters belonging to a huge family at the Xavier Mansion gave me some solace. I guess the idea of a sanctuary for literally anyone who will enter is very comforting and I admired the X-Men's amazing ability to give anyone a chance. Another thing that I think had a major effect on me was the tone. The cartoon and the late 90s - early 2000's comics carried a very specific tone and maintained a certain 'darkness' to them. But it wasn't a darkness like Gotham City, it was more of a sci-fi darkness. Everything that happened had gravitas. When the world was in peril in X-books, you really felt it. When Apocalypse and Sinister showed up, you knew things were gravely serious. When Bishop and Cable came to the mainstream universe from their respective futures, talking of dystopian destinies, you got the real sense that the actions that the X-Men made in the present would really affect how the future turned out. I loved all this stuff as a kid, and it's how I want my X-Books to be even today. In my opinion, this is what made Remender's Uncanny X-Force such a success--it played right to all of us that loved the 90s-00s story lines and tones!

Man.. I could probably keep at this all day. But you get the point.

#4 Posted by theTimeStreamer (2841 posts) - - Show Bio

wolverine and the fact that he's a better father figure than most real fathers in comics.

#5 Posted by McKlayn (1077 posts) - - Show Bio

I like X men due to the serious, realistic aspects of life it addresses. Sure it dresses it up in fancy spandex out fits and gives it eyebeams and wings but still it boils down to powerful stories of racism, and utter hate for no reason. So yea those are the thing that appealed me, accompany that with a wide variety of cast members (more women and ethnic groups then any other team) and really good chemistry, even to the point where Everyone doesn't always get along (storm and cyclops battling for the lead, wolverine and cyclops way back when) also i started reading it when i was a teenager so the whole "school" aspect was something i could relate too (i started with Gen X) so those are just a few off the top of my head

#6 Posted by M3th (2099 posts) - - Show Bio

I always liked the team. I think they are my favorite super hero team. It was a team that pretty much gave anyone s chance.

I loved the 90's cartoon a great deal as well. The team dynamic was always interesting and diverse. It wasn't a group agreeing to team up, it was a extended family fighting for survival and respect.

I feel bad I missed the X-Men saga/era/time when Anole/Hellion/Rockslide/et cetera where around.

I like the current story/saga/era/time the X-characters are in now.

#7 Posted by papad1992 (6829 posts) - - Show Bio

I like the fact that there is a character for everyone. Mine for example are Dani Moonstar, Kitty Pryde, Wolfsbane, and Sage.

#8 Posted by Teerack (6394 posts) - - Show Bio

I like all the infighting and mistrust.

#9 Edited by ArturoCalaKayVee (11626 posts) - - Show Bio

I don't know if there is anything I DON'T like about the X-Men..well, except the fact Cyclops is a villain now. I just have an emotional attachment to the X-Men (and to Spider-Man) that I can't/don't have with any other character(s)/book.

#10 Posted by Lightburst (163 posts) - - Show Bio

@teerack said:

I like all the infighting and mistrust.

This.

#11 Posted by Fuchsia_Nightingale (10180 posts) - - Show Bio

X-men legends 2.

#12 Posted by AgeofHurricane (7297 posts) - - Show Bio

Melodramatic 90's show. Loved it. Epitome of everything a Marvel animated series from that era should be.

But things are kinda sh*t now, until Wood's X-Men comes out, that is.

#13 Posted by InnerVenom123 (29501 posts) - - Show Bio

I like how Wolverine is probably gonna be killed off soon.

#14 Posted by The Stegman (24460 posts) - - Show Bio

I don't really like the X-Men, I like the idea of them representing minorities being mistreated, feared and hated by the majority, and I like how Xavier and Magneto represented MLK and Malcolm X. But as for the comics, I just don't find them that interesting, too many large egos that clash among themselves too much. Though Kitty Pryde is freakin' awesome.

#15 Posted by jhazzroucher (15823 posts) - - Show Bio

most of them are more interesting than other comic characters

#16 Posted by poisonfleur (3043 posts) - - Show Bio

X-men for me was the first cartoon I ever watched with diversity. I remember when I was younger and it never crossed my mind that Storm was black, Jubilee was Asain, etc. I enjoyed the many different personalities, walks of life, dynamic of the characters and they many ways they coexisted.
X-men are always the underdogs-- and I love that. Anyone who has ever felt different can relate to them on some kind of level. Whether your Black, Gay, Jewish, Fat, etc... The list can go one forever. The X-men and their world makes gives the message that: No matter how different, oppressed, or outcast ed you are, chances are someone else feels the same way-- and at the end of the day, everyone can get along AND have their own voice and story that matters. If the X-men can bring SO many different types of people together-- savages, goddesses, scientists, students, ex-villains, former terrorists, or whatever-- and STILL BE FAMILY-- then we should be able to too.

Side note: I love the uncanny, iconic, and beautiful characters in the x-world. Ex: Storm, Psylocke, Rogue, Beast, Blink, Emma, Magneto. Very interesting for the eye to look at! :D

#17 Posted by oldnightcrawler (4576 posts) - - Show Bio

For sure one of the things that I always took comfort in--and still do--is the aspect of the school and the community that it fosters. I had a tough time socially in school as a kid, and for me, I always felt that reading about my favorite characters belonging to a huge family at the Xavier Mansion gave me some solace. I guess the idea of a sanctuary for literally anyone who will enter is very comforting and I admired the X-Men's amazing ability to give anyone a chance.

this for sure..

wolverine and the fact that he's a better father figure than most real fathers in comics.

something I don't think he gets enough credit for these days.

I like the fact that there is a character for everyone.

and they've done a better job of it than any other comic, in my mind.

I don't know if there is anything I DON'T like about the X-Men... I just have an emotional attachment to the X-Men (and to Spider-Man) that I can't/don't have with any other character(s)/book.

I really can't imagine what my life would be like if I hadn't grown up with these characters.

Their purpose, their mission, their morality, and their heroism. They stand for just about everything I believe in.

Sure, I love how colorful and over the top the characters are, and how fantastic their adventures can be; that stuff's what makes it so much fun to look at and to read, so there's no denying that that's a big draw. But what makes them distinct in their genre, for me, is how human and relatable the characters are, despite being so colorful and strange. It's that sense of the uncanny.

They all have different, sometimes even clashing, perspectives, and it's great to watch them hash that out because they all represent views worth considering. And the stuff they all agree on, that's the stuff I believe in too.

#18 Posted by Arkhamc1tizen (2145 posts) - - Show Bio

night crawler

#19 Posted by AweSam (7375 posts) - - Show Bio

Well, each character is different in their own way. I guess that's why. I really don't know.

#20 Posted by Polarity (106 posts) - - Show Bio

They use to be the outsiders and the underdogs striving for respect from the world at large. They weren't the glamour heroes like the FF or the Avengers, but at the same time they weren't street-level heroes either. Other than their genes and Sentinels chasing them, this is how they forged a brotherhood amongst themselves. The sacrifice in Dallas during the Fall of the Mutants might be the apex moment in X-men history. I can't think of anything else that comes close.

#21 Edited by ArturoCalaKayVee (11626 posts) - - Show Bio

@oldnightcrawler: I really can't imagine what my life would be like if I hadn't grown up with these characters.

Their purpose, their mission, their morality, and their heroism. They stand for just about everything I believe in.

Sure, I love how colorful and over the top the characters are, and how fantastic their adventures can be; that stuff's what makes it so much fun to look at and to read, so there's no denying that that's a big draw. But what makes them distinct in their genre, for me, is how human and relatable the characters are, despite being so colorful and strange. It's that sense of the uncanny.

They all have different, sometimes even clashing, perspectives, and it's great to watch them hash that out because they all represent views worth considering. And the stuff they all agree on, that's the stuff I believe in too.

Beautifully written.

#22 Edited by papad1992 (6829 posts) - - Show Bio

@papad1992 said:

I like the fact that there is a character for everyone.

and they've done a better job of it than any other comic, in my mind.

Better than the Avengers for sure!

#24 Posted by oldnightcrawler (4576 posts) - - Show Bio

@oldnightcrawler said:

@papad1992 said:

I like the fact that there is a character for everyone.

and they've done a better job of it than any other comic, in my mind.

Better than the Avengers for sure!

well, the Avengers, as a concept for a comic book, seems to operate on an entirely different system. It could be argued that by always showcasing a selection of characters that are already proven to be among their most popular, alongside varying cult favorites or less exposed characters, that it's trying to appeal to as many people in a different way.

The main difference being, in my mind, that characters are rarely created to be Avengers (and those few that are are rarely very good), because the whole idea of the Avengers is that it's a group of already established characters. So characters like Swordsman, Mantis, Starfox, Dr.Druid, Deathcry, Silverclaw, Triathalon, etc.. are bound to be less dimensional, and therefore out of place in the group.

Compared to the X-men, in which almost every character (except Magneto, Wolverine, and Rogue) were designed specifically to be X-men, to fit into and become part of that story, the Avengers have no real way to properly compete in that arena.

Or is that what Avengers Arena is for? I don't read it..

#25 Posted by PhoenixoftheTides (3563 posts) - - Show Bio

I liked the aspect of them being more focused on schooling and training versus most superheroes.The idea that they were reluctant heroes became less tenable as they slipped more and more into adventuring territory like other teams, though.

#26 Posted by oldnightcrawler (4576 posts) - - Show Bio

I liked the aspect of them being more focused on schooling and training versus most superheroes.The idea that they were reluctant heroes became less tenable as they slipped more and more into adventuring territory like other teams, though.

Yeah, it's one of the things that makes them distinct. The X-men always seem to lose something when they're removed from that. It's part of why, for me, the book was a lot less interesting between '87-01; there was no association with them being either teachers or students. To me, that's half of the premise.

#27 Edited by papad1992 (6829 posts) - - Show Bio

@oldnightcrawler said:

@papad1992 said:

@oldnightcrawler said:

@papad1992 said:

I like the fact that there is a character for everyone.

and they've done a better job of it than any other comic, in my mind.

Better than the Avengers for sure!

well, the Avengers, as a concept for a comic book, seems to operate on an entirely different system. It could be argued that by always showcasing a selection of characters that are already proven to be among their most popular, alongside varying cult favorites or less exposed characters, that it's trying to appeal to as many people in a different way.

The main difference being, in my mind, that characters are rarely created to be Avengers (and those few that are are rarely very good), because the whole idea of the Avengers is that it's a group of already established characters. So characters like Swordsman, Mantis, Starfox, Dr.Druid, Deathcry, Silverclaw, Triathalon, etc.. are bound to be less dimensional, and therefore out of place in the group.

Compared to the X-men, in which almost every character (except Magneto, Wolverine, and Rogue) were designed specifically to be X-men, to fit into and become part of that story, the Avengers have no real way to properly compete in that arena.

Or is that what Avengers Arena is for? I don't read it..

I don't think characters are created to become X-Men... I think they're are created as mutants and therefore associated with the X-Men, since the X-Men deal with mutant relations...

The Avengers and the X-Men are the two biggest comic book teams Marvel has... they're always being compared. I get what you're saying about characters like Swordsman, Mantis, Dr. Druid, etc... but the same could be said for many mutants created. They can either be created for the team or they could be created as separate "heroes" that eventually join the team countless times.

Avengers Arena deals with young heroes (most notably from Avengers Academy) that are pitted against each other (like hunger games). U should read it... it's quite good.

#28 Posted by oldnightcrawler (4576 posts) - - Show Bio

I don't think characters are created to become X-Men... I think they're are created as mutants and therefore associated with the X-Men, since the X-Men deal with mutant relations...

The Avengers and the X-Men are the two biggest comic book teams Marvel has... they're always being compared. I get what you're saying about characters like Swordsman, Mantis, Dr. Druid, etc... but the same could be said for many mutants created. They can either be created for the team or they could be created as separate "heroes" that eventually join the team countless times.

Sure, but characters created to be Avengers generally suck, and almost all X-men are created to be at least part of the X-men's story. The Avengers are meant to be characters from disparate stories, and characters in the X-men almost never are. I get why people compare the two groups, but in at least that one way, there really is no basis for comparison.

Avengers Arena deals with young heroes (most notably from Avengers Academy) that are pitted against each other (like hunger games). U should read it... it's quite good.

mm.. sounds like when the Shadow King took over Muir Island, more than anything to do with being an Avenger.

Not sure it'd be my cup of joe..

#29 Posted by papad1992 (6829 posts) - - Show Bio

@papad1992 said:

I don't think characters are created to become X-Men... I think they're are created as mutants and therefore associated with the X-Men, since the X-Men deal with mutant relations...

The Avengers and the X-Men are the two biggest comic book teams Marvel has... they're always being compared. I get what you're saying about characters like Swordsman, Mantis, Dr. Druid, etc... but the same could be said for many mutants created. They can either be created for the team or they could be created as separate "heroes" that eventually join the team countless times.

Sure, but characters created to be Avengers generally suck, and almost all X-men are created to be at least part of the X-men's story. The Avengers are meant to be characters from disparate stories, and characters in the X-men almost never are. I get why people compare the two groups, but in at least that one way, there really is no basis for comparison.

Avengers Arena deals with young heroes (most notably from Avengers Academy) that are pitted against each other (like hunger games). U should read it... it's quite good.

mm.. sounds like when the Shadow King took over Muir Island, more than anything to do with being an Avenger.

Not sure it'd be my cup of joe..

I'd have to disagree...

Avengers created characters are cool... depends on which ones.

And I'm a Runaways fan so that's the biggest reason I'm reading Avengers Academy...

#30 Posted by oldnightcrawler (4576 posts) - - Show Bio

I'd have to disagree...

Avengers created characters are cool... depends on which ones.

can you name three characters who were invented to be Avengers that are actually cool?

And I'm a Runaways fan so that's the biggest reason I'm reading Avengers Academy...

Runaways are awesome, so I can totally appreciate that! :)

#31 Posted by lykopis (10746 posts) - - Show Bio

Different people coming together thinking something was broken inside them only to discover there was nothing to be fixed while they became a family.

At least, that's how they used to/should be.

#32 Posted by papad1992 (6829 posts) - - Show Bio

@papad1992 said:

I'd have to disagree...

Avengers created characters are cool... depends on which ones.

can you name three characters who were invented to be Avengers that are actually cool?

And I'm a Runaways fan so that's the biggest reason I'm reading Avengers Academy...

Runaways are awesome, so I can totally appreciate that! :)

Actually I'll name my top seven... Black Knight, Hellcat, Silverclaw, Lionheart, Vision, Swordsman, and Mantis.

And I own the complete Runaways series...

#33 Posted by Ultra_beleco (184 posts) - - Show Bio

The fact they are true heroes.

They are hate by the enemies. By they people they protect. Almost all of them are very far from their home.

Yet they are doing what heroes should do. Using their abilities to help those in need!

#34 Posted by oldnightcrawler (4576 posts) - - Show Bio

@oldnightcrawler said

can you name three characters who were invented to be Avengers that are actually cool?

Actually I'll name my top seven... Black Knight, Hellcat, Silverclaw, Lionheart, Vision, Swordsman, and Mantis.

ooh, I did forget about the Vision.

Black Knight and Hellcat are actually re-makes of older characters (like the Human Torch was, actually, so was the Vision..). The rest of these prove my point well enough though.

#35 Posted by Aiden Cross (15569 posts) - - Show Bio

I just loved the fact that they were one big family, who took care of each other, fought for a better world and was a safe haven for those that didn't fit in what society deemed normal.

#36 Edited by papad1992 (6829 posts) - - Show Bio

@papad1992 said:

@oldnightcrawler said

can you name three characters who were invented to be Avengers that are actually cool?

Actually I'll name my top seven... Black Knight, Hellcat, Silverclaw, Lionheart, Vision, Swordsman, and Mantis.

ooh, I did forget about the Vision.

Black Knight and Hellcat are actually re-makes of older characters (like the Human Torch was, actually, so was the Vision..). The rest of these prove my point well enough though.

That's ur opinion... not a set fact!

#37 Posted by oldnightcrawler (4576 posts) - - Show Bio

@oldnightcrawler said:ooh, I did forget about the Vision.

Black Knight and Hellcat are actually re-makes of older characters (like the Human Torch was, actually, so was the Vision..). The rest of these prove my point well enough though.

That's ur opinion... not a set fact!

what is?

that they aren't very cool? I guess.

#38 Edited by papad1992 (6829 posts) - - Show Bio

@papad1992 said:

@oldnightcrawler said:ooh, I did forget about the Vision.

Black Knight and Hellcat are actually re-makes of older characters (like the Human Torch was, actually, so was the Vision..). The rest of these prove my point well enough though.

That's ur opinion... not a set fact!

what is?

that they aren't very cool? I guess.

What makes those characters I suggested (Black Knight, Hellcat, Silverclaw, Lionheart, Vision, Swordsman, and Mantis) "un-cool?"

#39 Posted by oldnightcrawler (4576 posts) - - Show Bio

@oldnightcrawler said:

that they aren't very cool? I guess.

What makes those characters I suggested (Black Knight, Hellcat, Silverclaw, Lionheart, Vision, Swordsman, and Mantis) "un-cool?"

well, like you said, it's really a matter of opinion. But I just find all of those characters (except maybe Vision) to be pretty flimsy compared to the pre-established characters that make up most of the Avengers all-star type membership.

Maybe it's because I think of the Avengers as being like the MU's version of the JLA (but with cooler characters), like every member should be a star in their own right. None of those guys really fit that bill, for me.

#40 Posted by papad1992 (6829 posts) - - Show Bio

@papad1992 said:

@oldnightcrawler said:

that they aren't very cool? I guess.

What makes those characters I suggested (Black Knight, Hellcat, Silverclaw, Lionheart, Vision, Swordsman, and Mantis) "un-cool?"

well, like you said, it's really a matter of opinion. But I just find all of those characters (except maybe Vision) to be pretty flimsy compared to the pre-established characters that make up most of the Avengers all-star type membership.

Maybe it's because I think of the Avengers as being like the MU's version of the JLA (but with cooler characters), like every member should be a star in their own right. None of those guys really fit that bill, for me.

That's the problem with the Avengers... they only focus on the star characters with the most power, and disregard other characters (more now than then). That to me is the downfall of the Avengers.

#41 Posted by oldnightcrawler (4576 posts) - - Show Bio

@oldnightcrawler said:

well, like you said, it's really a matter of opinion. But I just find all of those characters (except maybe Vision) to be pretty flimsy compared to the pre-established characters that make up most of the Avengers all-star type membership.

Maybe it's because I think of the Avengers as being like the MU's version of the JLA (but with cooler characters), like every member should be a star in their own right. None of those guys really fit that bill, for me.

That's the problem with the Avengers... they only focus on the star characters with the most power, and disregard other characters (more now than then). That to me is the downfall of the Avengers.

It's not just about having the most power; Cap', Hawkeye, 'Widow, Hank Pym, and the Wasp are all main characters, and most of them have seen most of their character development in the pages of Avengers, despite not being especially powerful. I don't think it's a bad thing that established characters has mainly been what the Avengers is about.

It's not like the characters they do focus on aren't good characters, but I guess that's why they have books like Young Avengers and Avengers Arena: for people who aren't as into the more classic characters.

#42 Posted by papad1992 (6829 posts) - - Show Bio

@papad1992 said:

@oldnightcrawler said:

well, like you said, it's really a matter of opinion. But I just find all of those characters (except maybe Vision) to be pretty flimsy compared to the pre-established characters that make up most of the Avengers all-star type membership.

Maybe it's because I think of the Avengers as being like the MU's version of the JLA (but with cooler characters), like every member should be a star in their own right. None of those guys really fit that bill, for me.

That's the problem with the Avengers... they only focus on the star characters with the most power, and disregard other characters (more now than then). That to me is the downfall of the Avengers.

It's not just about having the most power; Cap', Hawkeye, 'Widow, Hank Pym, and the Wasp are all main characters, and most of them have seen most of their character development in the pages of Avengers, despite not being especially powerful. I don't think it's a bad thing that established characters has mainly been what the Avengers is about.

It's not like the characters they do focus on aren't good characters, but I guess that's why they have books like Young Avengers and Avengers Arena: for people who aren't as into the more classic characters.

But that's the thing, Cap, Hawkeye, Black Widow, Hank Pym, and the Wasp are pretty well versed on their own. They are pretty powerful characters with writers over the years contributing to their "power sets and skills" in more ways than one. I'm just not a big fan of the Avengers or their concept...

Young Avengers and Avengers Arena (even though Avengers Arena only contains like 4 or 5 Avengers-related characters) aren't meant "for people who aren't as into the more classic characters." their just books focusing on different characters and different concepts than the Avengers' ones.

#43 Posted by oldnightcrawler (4576 posts) - - Show Bio

@oldnightcrawler said:

It's not just about having the most power; Cap', Hawkeye, 'Widow, Hank Pym, and the Wasp are all main characters, and most of them have seen most of their character development in the pages of Avengers, despite not being especially powerful. I don't think it's a bad thing that established characters has mainly been what the Avengers is about.

It's not like the characters they do focus on aren't good characters, but I guess that's why they have books like Young Avengers and Avengers Arena: for people who aren't as into the more classic characters.

But that's the thing, Cap, Hawkeye, Black Widow, Hank Pym, and the Wasp are pretty well versed on their own. They are pretty powerful characters with writers over the years contributing to their "power sets and skills" in more ways than one. I'm just not a big fan of the Avengers or their concept...

Young Avengers and Avengers Arena (even though Avengers Arena only contains like 4 or 5 Avengers-related characters) aren't meant "for people who aren't as into the more classic characters." their just books focusing on different characters and different concepts than the Avengers' ones.

oh, really? because I'd have never guessed.

I do think you're right about YA and AA, though. Which makes it that much more confusing that they both have "Avengers" in their titles. My guess is that, because they know that the Avengers is about somewhat established characters, they use these books as a place to establish them.

I mean, it could be that they're just trying to give the books some name recognition, and I'm sure that's part of it, too; but if someone only knows the Avengers from other media, these probably aren't going to be the books they'll gravitate towards. I think it has more to do with "Avengers (fill in the blank)" being more appealing than a random book like Marvel Comics Presents or something.

#44 Posted by papad1992 (6829 posts) - - Show Bio

@papad1992 said:

@oldnightcrawler said:

It's not just about having the most power; Cap', Hawkeye, 'Widow, Hank Pym, and the Wasp are all main characters, and most of them have seen most of their character development in the pages of Avengers, despite not being especially powerful. I don't think it's a bad thing that established characters has mainly been what the Avengers is about.

It's not like the characters they do focus on aren't good characters, but I guess that's why they have books like Young Avengers and Avengers Arena: for people who aren't as into the more classic characters.

But that's the thing, Cap, Hawkeye, Black Widow, Hank Pym, and the Wasp are pretty well versed on their own. They are pretty powerful characters with writers over the years contributing to their "power sets and skills" in more ways than one. I'm just not a big fan of the Avengers or their concept...

Young Avengers and Avengers Arena (even though Avengers Arena only contains like 4 or 5 Avengers-related characters) aren't meant "for people who aren't as into the more classic characters." their just books focusing on different characters and different concepts than the Avengers' ones.

oh, really? because I'd have never guessed.

I do think you're right about YA and AA, though. Which makes it that much more confusing that they both have "Avengers" in their titles. My guess is that, because they know that the Avengers is about somewhat established characters, they use these books as a place to establish them.

I mean, it could be that they're just trying to give the books some name recognition, and I'm sure that's part of it, too; but if someone only knows the Avengers from other media, these probably aren't going to be the books they'll gravitate towards. I think it has more to do with "Avengers (fill in the blank)" being more appealing than a random book like Marvel Comics Presents or something.

Are you using sarcasm now... because I got enough to choke a nun.

And the Avengers are dubbed "Earth's Mightiest Heroes," meaning the team comprises of the greatest heroes of Earth, not only previously established characters, but characters of a higher status than others. The reason Young Avengers are considered Avengers is because they were supposed to be the heroes of tomorrow. Same reason for Avengers Arena I'm guessing. I mean, The Braddock Academy was training teenagers to be the next generation of heroes, and since the book also comprises of Avengers Academy kids then that's why I assume it has the "avengers" in the title.

#45 Posted by Yung ANcient One (4806 posts) - - Show Bio

@m3th said:

I always liked the team. I think they are my favorite super hero team. It was a team that pretty much gave anyone s chance.

I loved the 90's cartoon a great deal as well. The team dynamic was always interesting and diverse. It wasn't a group agreeing to team up, it was a extended family fighting for survival and respect.

I feel bad I missed the X-Men saga/era/time when Anole/Hellion/Rockslide/et cetera where around.

I like the current story/saga/era/time the X-characters are in now.

Same here.

( + )

This edit will also create new pages on Comic Vine for:

Beware, you are proposing to add brand new pages to the wiki along with your edits. Make sure this is what you intended. This will likely increase the time it takes for your changes to go live.

Comment and Save

Until you earn 1000 points all your submissions need to be vetted by other Comic Vine users. This process takes no more than a few hours and we'll send you an email once approved.