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Wonder Woman

Character » Wonder Woman appears in 4630 issues.

Born the daughter of Queen Hippolyta on Paradise Island to a race of Amazon Warriors, Diana is a princess, an ambassador, a warrior and a superhero. Using divine powers, granted to her by the Gods of Olympus, Diana went to the United States of America to fight for peace, justice and truth as Wonder Woman.

NEW Wonder Woman: Earth One Interviews!

#1 Posted by SCORPIO_CASSADINE (741 posts) - - Show Bio

The New Yanick Paquette Interview...
http://dorkshelf.com/2013/06/20/inte...-wonder-woman/

New Interview with Morrison About Wonder Woman Earth One From The L.A. Times

Wonder Woman is getting a modern makeover in an upcoming graphic novel by award-winning comic writer Grant Morrison and artist Yanick Paquette. “Wonder Woman: Earth One” reimagines the Amazon warrior’s mythic origin in a modern-day setting. The graphic novel follows J. Michael Straczynski’s “Superman: Earth One” and Geoff Johns’ “Batman: Earth One.”

For Morrison, who is nearing the end of his successful run with “Batman Incorporated” (issue No. 13 is due out July 24), writing a Wonder Woman book represented a chance to round out the trinity. Morrison has already written extensive Superman and Batman stories, but Wonder Woman has always been a periphery character in his work. Paquette (“Ultimate X-Men,” “Swamp Thing”) drew a handful of “Wonder Woman” books in the late 1990s.

The 120-page “Wonder Woman: Earth One” comes at a time when the lasso-wielding heroine appears to be on the brink of a popularity resurgence. The CW is developing a Wonder Woman television show, and many fans are pushing for a big-screen feature based on the Amazon.

Hero Complex chatted with Morrison about the character’s origins, previous Wonder Woman iterations, and his plans for the superheroine in “Wonder Woman: Earth One.”

HC: A Wonder Woman graphic novel is a hefty project. Why a graphic novel as opposed to a comic series?

GM: Basically, Dan DiDio came to me and said, “Would you like to do this Wonder Woman graphic novel?” It was never intended to be a six-issue series or any kind of limited series. It was a completely different format. I liked the idea of being able to write something that was like a novel, and also to tell a different version of the Wonder Woman story.

HC: So she was a character you wanted to tackle?

GM: Kind of. I’d done it before in “Justice League,” but she’s always been a kind of presence. And there’s something about the character that really annoyed me, to be honest, because I couldn’t quite get a hook on her. I felt like there were a lot of really strange contradictions in there…. And because it was a challenge to most people. If you read about filmmakers talking about Wonder Woman, it’s always, “Oh, we can’t make a Wonder Woman film because people wouldn’t buy into this, this, this or this.” So it seemed that it was a challenging character. And because I’d done Superman and Batman, I really wanted to do the DC trinity of major characters. So I kind of came to it ‘round the back door, but finally realized, “Yeah, I really want to do something with this and see if I can make it work in a way that I’d like to see it working.”

HC: How did you begin? Did you go back and read the original comics?

GM: I started with the first principles, which is what I usually do, and go back to the original creators’ intentions. I read up on the old William Moulton Marston [pen name Charles Moulton] stuff, with Harry Peter, the artist. And I also read up particularly on Marston’s domestic arrangements, which were the biggest influence on Wonder Woman, because he was a very progressive psychologist of the 1930s, and his wife was also a renowned psychologist, but they both shared a lover called Olive Byrne, who was the model for Wonder Woman. So they were in this very boho, free-love kind of experience, long before the ’60s and long after Rousseau and the romantics. He’s a very interesting character, and Wonder Woman was created as an opposition to what he saw as the bloodcurdling masculinity of the comics. He wanted to basically teach young men that submission to the loving authority of a clever and kind woman would be the best way to live, and it would end wars, and it would end the strife of men. So it’s a heady mix. He’s a smart guy, a smart woman at his side, with a younger smart woman with them. They were all together for the creation of this amazing character, so I felt that really, it wasn’t about superheroes at all. The whole essence of Wonder Woman is about a psychologist trying to teach us all a lesson. And although I don’t necessarily agree with Marston’s particular view on the world, or Marston’s particular kinks, I wanted to do something that at least lived up to those ideals.

HC: So it’s not about superheroes?

GM: It’s not a comic about superheroes punching each other. It’s about the sexes and how we feel about one another, and what a society of women cut off from the rest of the world for 3,000 years might look like, and what kind of sexuality, what kind of philosophy, what kind of science would that have developed, and how would that impact our world if it actually suddenly became apparent that these women existed. So for me, that was always the original Wonder Woman story, but when you hear it retold, there’s a lot of potential in there to talk about the way we live today and the way the sexes view one another, especially in an age when pornography has become so ubiquitous, to go back to this sort of strange eroticism that Martson had. I think it is a really interesting way to talk about the issues we have in the world today.

HC: Wonder Woman was one of the few superheroes created as a mainstream model for girls, not just a male audience. Are you hoping to attract a broader female audience with your retelling?

GM: Absolutely. We’ll see what happens. It all depends, I guess. It has a lot to do with marketing and the kinds of interviews that we do. But yeah, I was speaking the other day, and I said, “This is a book for mothers and their daughters,” so hopefully that will stand. But I think it’s better for teenage girls. I think younger girls, it may be too strong for them. But certainly teenage girls and their mothers.

HC: Wonder Woman is also one of a handful of heroes who uses diplomacy as much as strength. Did that factor into your take?

GM: What I’m trying to do here, and what I’ve done with Superman and Batman, is just try to embody the character on the page. All of the characters and the different things the characters meant to different generations, I wanted to get them all into this portrayal, so that these aspects are important. Also, Wonder Woman is the goddess of truth, so what does that mean? That was a big thing in the ’90s. So we’re going to bring that in — what happens to someone who’s the defender of truth when the truth is the thing that can actually destroy them? … We’re also going to deal with the notion of Wonder Woman having a costume, which I think is almost ridiculous. So we’re playing with that a little bit and doing something different from that, which surprisingly nobody has ever done. We’re going to do something with how she looks, which is quite different.

HC: Gail Simone and Brian Azzarello have both been lauded for their approach to the character in recent years. What aspects of those portrayals do you want to keep, and what do you want to leave behind?

GM: I didn’t want to be too influenced by those at all. The only influences I really wanted to have was the original Marston stories with Harry Peter, and also the Lynda Carter TV show, which I thought was a really good and workable translation of the Wonder Woman concept for a mass audience. I like it for that reason, and also Lynda Carter just embodied the character so beautifully. But she didn’t really get to do the stuff that the original Wonder Woman got to do. So for me, the idea was putting those two things together. In terms of other people’s versions of it, I really liked Gail Simone’s, and I’m loving what Brian Azzarello’s doing right now, but I didn’t want to be influenced by those, so I didn’t do a lot of reading on recent stuff. I just accepted that the other writers who are contemporary with me have done their own brilliant versions of this, so I wanted to do something a little different.

HC: What does your artist, Yanick Paquette, bring to the table?

GM: Just a brilliant skill for drawing. The first 15 pages are basically a retelling of the Greek myth as filtered through the original Wonder Woman story, where Hercules has enslaved the Amazons, and Hippolyta’s in chains, and basically the Amazons escape and declare that they will establish a paradise island far from the gaze of men. So he’s sent in that entire sequence now, and it’s just this beautiful mural, and he’s done all this amazing decorative stuff with baubles and shattered shards of Greek pottery. And all the scenes are drawn in this flat, graphic style of Greek art, so it really is the most amazing thing. And also what he does is he makes the women very glamorous, which I think is quite important. Wonder Woman, it’s a feminist tract, it really is. It’s a statement. But in the original, the Amazons on Paradise Island were all wearing the most beautiful 1930s makeup, you know eyeliner and bee-sting lips. I think we wanted to keep that aspect. Even after 3,000 years of separation from men, they still wear cosmetics. And there’s something really odd and ritualistic and fetishistic about that that we’ve kept. He captures those aspects of it, which I wanted it to have — the eroticism of Wonder Woman — and he does a brilliant update of Harry Peter’s approach.

HC: Wonder Woman hasn’t found that mainstream interest in recent years that Batman or Superman have. Why do you think that is?

GM: I just think that nobody’s told the great story yet. It seems a shame. She did have mainstream interest back in the original. So again, that’s why I’ve always gone back to it. Wonder Woman was a very high-selling comic back in the 1940s. It was really successful. But the sales diminished as soon as Marston died. So obviously whatever weirdness he brought to it was actually part of the DNA of Wonder Woman. We’re trying to bring some of that back. It’s a different version of it. It’s a modern strain. It’s by a writer that doesn’t necessarily agree with Marston’s philosophies but at least wants to honor the weirdness of what he was trying to do, and the message he was trying to bring to young men.
#2 Posted by Lvenger (20220 posts) - - Show Bio

Wow. I knew Morrison had something up his sleeve but from the sounds of it, this is going to be a revolutionary take on Wonder Woman if he's bringing in what made the Golden Age Wonder Woman so popular.

#3 Edited by Jonny_Anonymous (33602 posts) - - Show Bio

I really like the Earth One books so I'm looking forward to this. I hope they keep it going and do Green Lantern, Flash and Aquaman.

#4 Posted by Lvenger (20220 posts) - - Show Bio

I really like the Earth One books so I'm looking forward to this. I hope they keep it going and do Green Lantern, Flash and Aquaman.

I hated the first 3 put out so I'm hoping this will change my mind about Earth One.

#5 Edited by SmashBrawler (5798 posts) - - Show Bio

@lvenger said:

Wow. I knew Morrison had something up his sleeve but from the sounds of it, this is going to be a revolutionary take on Wonder Woman if he's bringing in what made the Golden Age Wonder Woman so popular.

Bondage?

But in all seriousness this does sound interestingly different.

#6 Posted by Lvenger (20220 posts) - - Show Bio

@lvenger said:

Wow. I knew Morrison had something up his sleeve but from the sounds of it, this is going to be a revolutionary take on Wonder Woman if he's bringing in what made the Golden Age Wonder Woman so popular.

Bondage?

But in all seriousness this does sound interestingly different.

Morrison never specified that did he? :P But yeah I mean the Golden Age vitality and embracing of the sexual nature and power of women that made Wonder Woman a hit in the first place.

#7 Edited by Jonny_Anonymous (33602 posts) - - Show Bio

@lvenger said:

@jonny_anonymous said:

I really like the Earth One books so I'm looking forward to this. I hope they keep it going and do Green Lantern, Flash and Aquaman.

I hated the first 3 put out so I'm hoping this will change my mind about Earth One.

What was it you didn't like about the other Earth One books?

I really like the fact shes not going to be running around in an American flag but I hope he wasn't being literal when he said Sci Fi.

#8 Posted by Lvenger (20220 posts) - - Show Bio

What was it you didn't like about the other Earth One books?

I really like the fact shes not going to be running around in an American flag but I hope he wasn't being literal when he said Sci Fi.

For Superman: Earth One, I'm not a fan of how JMS handled the way Clark was much more brash, impetuous or how he dealt with the dictator in Volume 2. Plus the villains haven't been adapted well for my liking. As for Batman, Johns does not know how to write him at all. And there's a rumour he doesn't like Batman either so why he's writing that Earth One volume, I have no idea. But I'm really looking forward to this Earth One trade. Morrison is a writer that can really get under the skin of a character and deliver a story which centres around interesting concepts and themes.

#9 Posted by Jonny_Anonymous (33602 posts) - - Show Bio

@lvenger: BTW what did you think of Morrison's Action Comics?

#10 Posted by dmessmer (365 posts) - - Show Bio

I'm really excited about this. Morrison's unusual sensibilities could be just what Wonder Woman needs to finally have a great story that also stays true to her character. Azzarello's book has been great, but it doesn't always feel like a Wonder Woman book to me. In my opinion, DC hasn't really done right by the character since Perez, except for some of the Rucka run (and I hear Simone was good, though I haven't read it yet).

#11 Posted by SCORPIO_CASSADINE (741 posts) - - Show Bio

@jonny_anonymous:

There were lots of sci-fi stories in the 40's Wonder Woman.

I'm wondering if there will be a war and Nazis.

The stuff Paquette said about ritualistic cosmetics was intriguing. I hope Wonder Woman looks like this.

There's nothing wrong with that costume.

#12 Posted by lilben42 (2550 posts) - - Show Bio
#13 Edited by dshipp17 (1045 posts) - - Show Bio

@scorpio_cassadine said:

@jonny_anonymous:

There were lots of sci-fi stories in the 40's Wonder Woman.

I'm wondering if there will be a war and Nazis.

The stuff Paquette said about ritualistic cosmetics was intriguing. I hope Wonder Woman looks like this.

There's nothing wrong with that costume.

The 40s Wonder Woman did actually incorporate lots of sci-fi within it. I liked the original Wonder Woman, along with the bondage and sci-fi; because it appears that Morrison will go by the spirit of Marston's intent, after so long with all subsequent writers, I'll be getting this graphic novel, but bracing for disappointment (e.g. hoping he'll emphasize the bondage beyond the first 15 pages, but bracing for the possibility that nothing more than about 3 pages will only show a display of bondage). The Marston run just had something about it that stuck with me, unlike any other subsequent Wonder Woman run. Next in line would be Messner-Loebs, than about the first 24 issues of the George Perez run (e.g. after reflecting back on it a lot, I really didn't like how he rebooted Dr. Psycho by having him mess with a baby; just seems like Perez is unable to empathize with someone in Dr. Psycho's predicament, so the editors should have put the breaks on his Dr. Psycho take and saved it for a subsequent writer; unfortunately, the only writer that appears to have been able to empathized with Dr. Psycho didn't appear to come until JMS and Phil Hester; imagine if the JMS/Hester version of Dr. Psycho was the reintroduction of him, instead; I would have sacrificed those 30 years or so to have Dr. Psycho properly reintroduced in such a way; problem though, is who have follow in their footsteps; could it be Morrison?; hope he does include Dr. Psycho in this graphic novel, if not make him a major part of it), than the Simone run, than the Rucka run, because Ferdinand was a main supporting character, while he appeared to have a larger plan for using Dr. Psycho (e.g. Rucka messed up in my mind by giving Ferdinand an outside romantic interest, other than Wonder Woman; his Hades was very much in contradiction to the earlier Messner-Loebs stuff in the ease with which he allowed Wonder Woman to escape the situation).

#14 Posted by Lvenger (20220 posts) - - Show Bio

@jonny_anonymous: It was good but not the match made in heaven I'd hoped it would be like All Star was. Morrison got a bit out of hand at times and the last arc dragged on a bit. Still, I enjoyed it for the most part. How about you?

#15 Posted by MartianManhunterIsBetterThanCyborg (2243 posts) - - Show Bio

I hope we get Steve Trevor and Etta Candy in this.

And hopefully Morrison tackles some other WW villains, because they are in need of a reinvention.

#16 Posted by lilben42 (2550 posts) - - Show Bio
#17 Posted by jointron33 (1902 posts) - - Show Bio

I don't like the sound of this at all. It's bad enough that ww has the stigma of the tv series, much like Batman did before the 1st Burton movie, but she has the stigma of golden age bondage with comic fans. Going back to it, doesn't sound like the way to go......at all.

#18 Posted by SCORPIO_CASSADINE (741 posts) - - Show Bio

@jointron33: There's no "stigma" concerning the Wonder Woman tv series. It wasn't very realistic, but it was is no way the exaggerated campfest the Batman series was. The hokiest thing was the Invisible Jet flying with a WW doll clearly visible inside, but what's mostly remembered is the spin, the lasso, bullets and bracelets and how great Lynda Carter looked in the costume.

Wonder Woman writers have always tried to reinvent her, no one has ever tried to go back to Marston's original intent and recreate what made her popular initially. I think it's about time.

#19 Posted by jointron33 (1902 posts) - - Show Bio

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