Is Thor really a God?

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#1 Posted by Husk45 (183 posts) - - Show Bio

Ok this might be a stupid question but is Thor Really a God? Because in order to be a god you have to be omnipotent, omniscient and be omnipresent and even thow Thor has the Odin Force and has the power of the   power of the Asgardia  Runes he is not.    
#2 Posted by The Mango (1477 posts) - - Show Bio
@Husk45 said:
" Because in order to be a god you have to be omnipotent, omniscient and be omnipresent    "
Where did you get that idea?
 
None of the Norse gods were any of these things.
#3 Posted by Emerald (1511 posts) - - Show Bio

Gods such as Norse, Greek, and Roman mythology were not omni anything.

#4 Posted by Agent9149 (2894 posts) - - Show Bio

yes thor is a *g*od

#5 Posted by Tesseract (872 posts) - - Show Bio
@Husk45 said:
" Ok this might be a stupid question but is Thor Really a God? Because in order to be a god you have to be omnipotent, omniscient and be omnipresent and even thow Thor has the Odin Force and has the power of the   power of the Asgardia  Runes he is not.     "
That is a definition of a GOD in some religions. In Greek, Roman and Norse religion good where not as someone here put it, omni anything, and also, you are looking for logical answers in comics which you really shouldn't do.
#6 Posted by DeathpooltheT1000 (10777 posts) - - Show Bio

Yes, he is.
Omnipotence is a paradox also, that could neve happen.

#7 Posted by Primmaster64 (21138 posts) - - Show Bio

Not really. I always considered them like  aliens.

#8 Posted by ViciousCesar! (2310 posts) - - Show Bio

yes he is.

#9 Posted by Jayso4201 (596 posts) - - Show Bio

GOD of thunder, greek and norse gods and such just controlled whatever it was they were supposed to be over or whatever.

Online
#10 Posted by Fire-brand (2308 posts) - - Show Bio

there is a difference between God and god. this debate is never a fun one.

#11 Posted by The New L (78 posts) - - Show Bio

To be honest I don't know. But if you were going buy the omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent thing then that means Beyonder, One Above All and Q from Star trek would be gods to. Heck Kyle Rayner after geting the power of Ion for the first time or Billy Batson when he got the powers of Shazam they would also count because when they got the powers for the first time they also has omnipotent, omniscient and they were omnipresent.  
#12 Posted by Theworldbreaker (1642 posts) - - Show Bio

the gods from old mythos wer not omni anything like the other guy said where did you get that you have to be compleatly omnipotent? (that includs hte other omni stuff).

#13 Edited by Mr. Dead Pool (2625 posts) - - Show Bio

Well technichally in some marvel stuff him and the Asgardians and all the other gods are extra-dimensional aliens with tech that is basically magic compared to even the most advanced races, and when they came to earth they were hailed as gods. But in regular Marvel continuity he is a god. They might use the magic-tech stuff in the movie but I don't really care it would still be good.

#14 Posted by TOMBSTONE999 (35 posts) - - Show Bio

The definitions of god or gods is very subjective.  God is a title that is usually bestowed upon other beings by lesser beings.  Superman matches any of the old mythological gods in terms of power as does a great many other characters.  So yes Thor is a god according to the Norse definition of what a god is.

#15 Posted by Thor's hammmer (7184 posts) - - Show Bio

the christian God's omniscents and omnipressence are both very questionable using the bible as reference but yes he is a god
#16 Posted by Theworldbreaker (1642 posts) - - Show Bio
@TOMBSTONE999:
coming from the guy who's name if flipped upside down woul start with "666"....lol nah jk jk man.
#17 Posted by mimic12 (548 posts) - - Show Bio

Im probably going to get a lot of hate mail for this but Thor is not a god. He is a Asgardian who was worshiped buy the Nosemen and Vikings Kind of Like Chariots of the Gods.    
#18 Posted by Mainline (1129 posts) - - Show Bio
@DeathpooltheT1000 said:
" Yes, he is. Omnipotence is a paradox also, that could neve happen. "
That's a common misconception born out of gibberish thought experiments such as creating the unliftable rock and equivocation.
 
"Omni" means "all" or "every" and "potence" here means "power" or "ability".  The monotheistic vision is of a god who possesses all powers and abilities that exist.  So if there is no power to create an unliftable rock, the monotheistic god would not possess that non-existent gibberish power.  This is completely in line with the meaning of "omniscient" or "omnipresence" which enable all knowledge or all presence... they do not grant presence to non-existent places or knowledge of non-existent knowledge.  Essentially, the monotheists ascribe their god the characteristic of omnipotence- accurately- because that vision possesses all possible powers (consistent with the description "almighty" - having the most or greatest powers not every conceivable power)... but armchair philosophers have equivocated that meaning of omnipotence with a phantom version ("creating the unliftable rock") which has never been applied to a mainstream religious deity.  It's not a particularly clever or novel paradox either on which to base the deconstruction of deity considering theologians have wrestled with such trite problems for over a   millennium without having their doctrine implode. 
 
But to be concise about it, even if the paradox is true under some weird definition of the word omnipotence, there is no major deity who is described as having gibberish abilities - "to simultaneously exist and not exist" and equally nonsensical challenges.  More extensive, nonetheless concise, deconstruction of the paradox can be found on wikipedia.
#19 Posted by The Master X (35 posts) - - Show Bio
@mimic12:
I totally agree with you dude.
#20 Posted by Fire-brand (2308 posts) - - Show Bio

hmm, clearly the christian god is not omnipresent or he would have seen Cain murder Able instead of having to ask "where is your brother"

#21 Posted by Mainline (1129 posts) - - Show Bio
@Fire-brand said:
" hmm, clearly the christian god is not omnipresent or he would have seen Cain murder Able instead of having to ask "where is your brother" "
I don't know whether the biblical god is described as omnipresent to begin with, but either way, a rhetorical or Socratic question wouldn't be proof to the contrary. 
 
When you see your child spill something and walk away it would not be abnormal to ask, "Did you spill something?" despite knowing they did.  The purpose of the question is not based on your lack of knowledge but in order to remind the child to clean their spill, spur a confession, or evaluate their honesty.
#22 Posted by The Master X (35 posts) - - Show Bio
@Fire-brand:
Maybe God was testing Cain to see if he will tell the truth. From what I here on TBN the Christian God is omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent.
#23 Posted by Mainline (1129 posts) - - Show Bio
@Husk45 said:
" Ok this might be a stupid question but is Thor Really a God? Because in order to be a god you have to be omnipotent, omniscient and be omnipresent and even thow Thor has the Odin Force and has the power of the   power of the Asgardia  Runes he is not.     "
I don't think power is the definition of godhood even by the Judaic standard.  There is the rule "you shall have no other gods before you"... which acknowledges that there are other "gods" which would be impossible if power was what defined a god in that context.  Instead, "god" means an object or being of worship... whether money, Baal,  oneself, or what not... above the one giving the rule.  Paul on Mars Hill talks about "the unknown god" in reference to the tradition of paying tribute to an unmarked alter as a catch all... so the concept of a lesser deity is not unfamiliar even using the omnipotence/Judaic context as your standard (of course, they also use the "one true" and "false god" distinction but that issue is self-resolving).
 
By that standard, is Thor worshiped in contemporary times?  If he is, it is a small minority and he is a "small" god by that standard.  Of course, by that standard you can't take away the historical fact he was worshiped as a god at some point.
#24 Posted by Husk45 (183 posts) - - Show Bio
@Primmaster64:
I think so to.
#25 Posted by Lovingdamnation (124 posts) - - Show Bio
@Husk45: You dare question the godliness of a god? /thorvoice
#26 Posted by The Master X (35 posts) - - Show Bio
@mimic12:
I like the Chariots of the Gods respons the best because that makes the most sense and is the most logical.
#27 Posted by Thor's hammmer (7184 posts) - - Show Bio

Is the mesure of a God the scope of his power or how he chooses to wield that power?  
#28 Posted by Crom-Cruach (8850 posts) - - Show Bio
@Thor's hammmer said:
" Is the mesure of a God the scope of his power or how he chooses to wield that power?   "
neither.
#29 Posted by Mike28 (129 posts) - - Show Bio

I got to say this is a very interesting topic. But Im also going to say no Thor is not a god. just because he is worshiped as one dose not mean he is one.
#30 Posted by Husk45 (183 posts) - - Show Bio
@Mike28:
I dident Thor was a God ether I just wanted to know what different people thought. So thanks for the feed back.
#31 Posted by Larkin1388 (1760 posts) - - Show Bio

Being anything omni has nothing to do with Norse Mythology. He is a God.

#32 Posted by ~The Wanderer~ (34406 posts) - - Show Bio

Thor is not a God, but he may be a god.

#33 Posted by The Master X (35 posts) - - Show Bio

Webster's definition of God. 
 
capitalized : the supreme or ultimate reality: as a : the Being perfect in power, wisdom, and goodness who is worshipped as creator and ruler of the universe b Christian Science : the incorporeal divine Principle ruling over all as eternal Spirit : infinite Mind
2 : a being or object believed to have more than natural attributes and powers and to require human worship; specifically : one controlling a particular aspect or part of reality
3 : a person or thing of supreme value
4 : a powerful ruler
#34 Posted by Ry Fryy (370 posts) - - Show Bio

So by definition, he is.

#35 Posted by velle37 (6058 posts) - - Show Bio

No. 
 
He is a figment of multitudes of imaginations........
#36 Posted by mimic12 (548 posts) - - Show Bio
@The Master X: 
 If you were going by that logic the Beyonder, Q, Superman, Star Brand and others would be considered to be gods to. So in my point of view Thor is not a god. 
#37 Posted by Mike28 (129 posts) - - Show Bio

Thor is not a god.
#38 Posted by Thor's hammmer (7184 posts) - - Show Bio

yes he is
#39 Posted by mimic12 (548 posts) - - Show Bio

I said it befor and I will say it again Chariots of the Gods.
#40 Posted by Husk45 (183 posts) - - Show Bio

Whats Chariots of the Gods have to do with Thor?
#41 Posted by Adam Michaels (435 posts) - - Show Bio

In Ancient Mythologies, gods were as flawed as the mortals. They were as evil, unjust, jealous, and possessed other imperfect qualities and personalities. This is why they were such popular characters and their stories so compelling (as well as the stories they were involved in).
#42 Posted by Valkyrja (24 posts) - - Show Bio

I'm a bit of a Norse mythology nut, and the mythology of Thor and how it's presented in the modern day is what turned me onto comic books in the first place. That being said, Marvel Thor is one of the Aesir. The Aesir were the gods of Norse mythology, and often had powers and strength far greater than those of the children of Midgard. Does this make Thor a god? If you're a viking, then yes, definitely. If you don't worship him, than he counts as a mythological figure who has returned from an ancient, mythic realm to find that the children of Midgard no longer worship him. He still keeps his Asgardian powers, of course, so it could be argued either way. It's entirely based on perspective.
 
I choose to think of Thor as a god simply because it puts him in his own superior category of badassery, but I can totally see where others come from when they say he's more of an "alien" figure. He comes from a different realm, is no longer worshiped (for the most part), and isn't human. "God" with a lowercase "g" is simply a term that can be applied to such a man.

#43 Posted by TOMBSTONE999 (35 posts) - - Show Bio
@The Master X:  If this is the case then god didn't know whether he wold tell the truth or not.  After all we test to find out what we don't know.
#44 Posted by The Master X (35 posts) - - Show Bio
@Husk45: 

Chariots of the Gods? Unsolved Mysteries of the Past is a book written in 1968 by Erich von Daniken. It involves the hypothesis that the technologies and religions of many ancient civilizations were given to them by space travelers who were welcomed as gods.
#45 Posted by Husk45 (183 posts) - - Show Bio
@The Master X:
So going by the logic of Chariots of the Gods Thor is not a god.
#46 Edited by TOMBSTONE999 (35 posts) - - Show Bio

As far as I'm concerned all gods are mythical until proven otherwise.  Humans decide what attributes they want to attribute to these gods.  The Norsemen decided that their gods were going have certain jobs and powers and characteristics.  I don't know if anyone here has read Thor Disassembled but after reading that there is no doubt in my mind that the Thor represented in Marvel is intended to be the "god" Thor.  I didn't see anything alien...just supernatural events.  Fenris swallowing the sun, the odinforce personifying in the form of a child, Thor literally chopping at the strings of the Norns loom and Thor ripping out his eyes and literally dying, hanging himself on the tree, going to hel and resurrecting to attain omniscient.   None of this is remotely alien-like  in any way aliens have been presented in the Marvel Universe.
 
No spaceships.....no advanced tech......just supernatural spells and magic.  Mythical god stuff.

#47 Posted by gambit987 (1275 posts) - - Show Bio

I consider them as inter-demensional beings but Odin created humankind. So technally they are I always considert the OAA the god of the marvel universe

#48 Posted by Kid_Omega_Prime (1250 posts) - - Show Bio

Thor might be a God are not but we can all agree on one thing Thor rocks.
#49 Posted by ~The Wanderer~ (34406 posts) - - Show Bio
@gambit987 said:
" I consider them as inter-demensional beings but Odin created humankind. So technally they are I always considert the OAA the god of the marvel universe "
Is there any on-panel evidence for this or is it just something he claimed to have done?
#50 Posted by grimlock (1571 posts) - - Show Bio
@Emerald: i agree. all the gods of various pantheons are more or less projections of human characteristics. Only God in monotheistic religions is omnipresent, omnipotent and omniscient

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