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Wonder Woman #18 - The Queen of Roots Review

5

Azzarello wraps up the current story arc but not without giving us a few clues at what is next to come.

The Good

This series has been, overall, an amazing ride. I love the distinct characters we get in this story and I have been so enjoying the way Azzarello has created this interesting dynamic between them. We've grown up with these characters from the very first issue, which has been fun, and it's nice to see them all come together here in this story. Each of them have very different goals and motives, but they all have grown together, and while it's been a gradual process, it's also been a very logical one and something that has been interesting to follow. This issue was a great way to end the story arc, but it's obvious that there are a lot of characters here that we have not seen the last of.

Like I mentioned above, the dynamic between the characters in this series is what makes it such an interesting read, particularly the interactions between Orion and Diana in this issue. We get a reason for certain actions that we saw exhibited by Orion in the last issue which I personally found to be cleverly explained, and I enjoyed the use of satire in this story at the character's expense.

The art by Cliff Chiang is, once again, absolutely stunning. His pencils are perfectly complimentary to the story we see here in this issue. There were also some pages illustrated by artist Goran Sudzuka which I found to be very well done, and although we have two separate artists, the colors really brought the entire issue together. This is an incredibly easy read because the story just really flows well and keeps you entertained the whole way through.

Azzarello manages to tie up any loose ends rather nicely, closing up the current story arc. What I like, however, is that the creator is clearly setting up the next arc for readers so that when we finally see it, it won't be such a jarring reading experience. The result is a well written story that has been a lot of fun to read.

The Bad

Nothing bad here. The script is well organized, the art beautiful, and the characterizations are a ton of fun.

The Verdict

The issue is great not only because it closes the chapter in the current arc in a way that is interesting, but also in a way that is really easy to follow and clear for readers to understand. I think it's fantastic that Azzarello has been simultaneously building this "First Born" story over the course of the last several issues, setting up the next story arc while closing up this last one. The art is, once again, really well executed and even though we have two different artists on this issue, the result is is still very fluid and easy to read. I am definitely looking forward to the next arc as well as the dynamics between the characters moving forward. The next issue may very well be a good place to start the series.

25 Comments
Posted by SNascimento

Amazing issue. Its last panel is just perfect.

Posted by darknightspideyfanboy

agree the last panel was a aww moment but also part me thinking who will betray wonder woman

Posted by theOVOXO

It was really a good issue to wrap up the first arc. It would have been better if Chiang drew the whole issue.

Posted by Power_Guy

I flipped through this book at my local shop this morning and promptly put it back. The art looked similar to the drawings in the back of a high schooler's notebook while the story came off as abysmally dull.

No surprise the book got a 5 star review with DC passing out interviews with Azzarello all day long. Any long term fan of Wonder Woman's who is not blindly loyal to the book or Azzarello knows this book has very little to do with Wonder Woman or the world that Marston put together when he created the book yet DC is letting Azzarello stick around for at least 6 more issues. What a shame...

Edited by dadarkknight36310

@power_guy You are like that person that calls the cops when people are having a goodtime because the music is up to loud. You are like that SNL character Debbie Downer. If you do like it fine don't read it, we will be fine without you. You have a whole stack of old stack of pre new 52 Wonder Woman books you can read over and over again Im sure. You have to realize this is the new 52 version of the character if you they kept things the same why would they reboot these books, when they could have just kept things the same.

Posted by bloggerboy

@Power_Guy said:

I flipped through this book at my local shop this morning and promptly put it back. The art looked similar to the drawings in the back of a high schooler's notebook while the story came off as abysmally dull.

No surprise the book got a 5 star review with DC passing out interviews with Azzarello all day long. Any long term fan of Wonder Woman's who is not blindly loyal to the book or Azzarello knows this book has very little to do with Wonder Woman or the world that Marston put together when he created the book yet DC is letting Azzarello stick around for at least 6 more issues. What a shame...

The art is stylished and I think it's perfect for the series.

Take a look at the stars, it's usually always a 5 with this book and rightfully so. Out of the trinity only WW is doing something really new and innovative with the character while still being thoroughly enjoyable. The way Azzarello uses words and dialogue alone elevates this one above mediocre.

As for it differing from Marston's Wonder Woman, I really can't see how Diana as a character is different. Her background and origin is different but she is as compassionate as ever for an amazon warrior. Wonder Woman hasn't been this good & topical and beyond since Infinite Crisis.

And if anything Azzarello is going back to the Perez version of the character with the Greek mythology stuff.

Posted by Power_Guy

@dadarkknight36310 said:

@power_guy You are like that person that calls the cops when people are having a goodtime because the music is up to loud. You are like that SNL character Debbie Downer. If you do like it fine don't read it, we will be fine without you. You have a whole stack of old stack of pre new 52 Wonder Woman books you can read over and over again Im sure. You have to realize this is the new 52 version of the character if you they kept things the same why would they reboot these books, when they could have just kept things the same.

Great. I'm glad that you're enjoying this run. I'm not sure why you can't respect that I'm not instead of hurling insults at me.

I'm not saying that Azzarello should have kept everything the same as pre-New 52 but this book barely seems about Wonder Woman IMO. The Olympians aren't even exclusive DC characters. Most of us have read Greek mythology, watched Hercules movies, and seen the Zena TV show so there's no need for Azzarello to try and rehash those things with Wonder Woman as a supporting character.

Posted by Superguy1591

Orion is cruising for a bruising...and Superman is the captain of the S.S. bruising!

Also, 5/5! IF this book had a male lead i would be the top selling book in the 52. But, for some reason, it's not selling. Hats off to BA, I hope he stays for another 18 issues...and then some!

Posted by Superguy1591
Tech him respect, CK!
Posted by Ghidoran

I swear Wonder Woman fans are the absolute worst. They'll cry and moan if her tiara is the wrong shade of grey. Azzarello has made arguably the best comic of the New 52, the art is incredibly well done and matches the Greek style of old, the characters are fresh and interesting and the storytelling is top notch. But, wait, she's not the paragon of feminism like she was in the 50's, when women actually needed a figure like her? The comic sucks. She doesn't have the same old boring supporting cast of Steve Trevor and Etta Candy? The comic sucks. There's no invisible jets, magic potions or whatever stupid crap the Silver Age version of the character dealt with? The comic sucks.

I know people find it hard to accept change, but they've swallowed it, looked past their biases, and managed to enjoy most of the New 52. Wonder Woman fans, for some reason, are incredibly thick-headed and refuse to do so, continuously insulting and deriding the series even though it's been the best interpretation of the character since Rucka.

Posted by Press Oblivion

Sara, there were 3 artists on this title. . . no one knows why.

@Power_Guy said:

I flipped through this book at my local shop this morning and promptly put it back. The art looked similar to the drawings in the back of a high schooler's notebook while the story came off as abysmally dull.

agreed.

There was a glimmer of action in this one as Diana was about to hand Hermes his ass but the positively useless Orion comes out of nowhere and interrupts the bout in classic WWE style story telling.

What I don't understand is the statement repeated over and over again is how this arc matches Greek Mythology of old. This statement does not make an argument because no one ever provides anything to compare it to, or support the notion that Azzarello is paralleling or adopting definitively Greek story telling techniques or characterizations.

The other term that I cannot get past is that anyone would ever see this as a "HORROR" themed story. There has not been one element in this tale since issue 1 that ever lead me to think or feel that this was a horror story as no character is ever horrified, they are all strong and willing to dive head first into the fray. The only thing that was horrific was the decompression that dragged on to this unbelievable conclusion. To quote Marven the Martian . . . ."Where's my Kaboom . . . . Where's my earth shattering Kaboom?" There was a lot of build up waiting for something awe inspiring to happen, entire issues where we were lead astray while the plot meandered and Wonder Woman was deeply marginalized, and the story fizzled and bottomed out at the end. . . . right into a . . . family portrait?

A family portrait? With Hera? The character that started this whole debacle, who tried to kill Zola and her child? Hera who, it seems, did destroy Wonder Woman's entire race? Hera, a genocidal manic, portrayed in a family portrait like were all watching an episode of All in the Family, how sweet. Surely Wonder Woman's compassion runs far deeper than my own, and is a testament to her character, but this is perverted.

There is a lot wrong with how this arc ended up and we had to wade through a lot of doldrums to get there.

Posted by SNascimento

@Press Oblivion: I think you misunderstood the meaning of the "family portrait". The fact that people there are really not friends and there is so much mistrust and issues between them is what makes it so amazing. This is very much like how the olimpian family is portrayed in WW. But now it's... let's say, her family?

The panel is awesome because of everything it is, and at the sametime everything it is not.

Posted by lifeboy

@Power_Guy: I agree. I started collecting ww back issues and loved them. Then I picked up a subscription when the new 52 started and the art was a joke. And the writing, I could finish reading within minutes. The only good thing about this were the colors but I felt riped off so I canceled after 7 issues. But seeing month after month of good 5 star reviews by babs, I decided to pick it up at issue 17 and 18 today. What a mistake, I was right with my first judgement. Yuck! The drawing is still weak and I finished reading both within 10 minutes.

Posted by soumya

After the inception of the new 52,I am having two great books.One is Batman and the other is Wonder Woman.Brian Azzarello wrote an epic story of WW.He properly introduced Orion to us.Orion's character development is really compelling.Most importantly Azzarello doesn't care about trying synchronize with different events from different titles in DCU.It is good IMO.His story is refreshing,new and epic.Nowadays creative teams come and go.It's good to see DC keeping both Azzarello and Snyder to set a new benchmark on WW and Batman stories.

Posted by No_Name_

First, I apologize to anyone who believes this issue does not deserve all five of its stars, but I don't apologize for issuing them.

Second, I am pretty offended that there are people who believe that because a reviewer does not agree with his or her negative opinion of a comic that it must be because the creator of the series recently issued interviews with various news outlets and not because the reviewer genuinely enjoyed the book. I think one of the worst things a commentator in a forum can do is make accusations about a reviewer/journalist's integrity and I feel that there have been far too many instances where this sort of thing has so cavalierly been thrown about. So yeah, I take great offense to that.

If you had been following the series from the start, you would have a great appreciation for this issue/end of the arc, I think. This story was about betrayal, family and Wonder Woman's insistance in having faith in others, sometimes against her better judgement. Think back to the beginning of the series when Diana was lied to about who she is and where she had come from by her own Mother. Hippolyta and her Amazon "sisters" were the only family she had ever known, but they betrayed her, in a sense. She lost them all. That final page depicts a very unconventional family: a group of Olympus' rejects, Orion and Zola. Some of these characters found themselves at the opposite end of Diana's sword initially, but now here they are all together in the same room, crowding around a young child. They all have different reasons, motives for doing what they do, but in that moment their goals are the same and that has brought them together. It's a great moment that brings things full circle. Diana's goal this entire time has remained the same, and she inadvertently influenced the change in others. I found that compelling.

We've watched Diana experience tremendous betrayal, but she never stopped believing in the good that exists in people. War is a perfect example of this. As a young girl (issue 0) she learned from him, but the difference between them was her compassion. Now, the roles are reversed and War has learned to be compassionate from her. The teacher becomes the student, so to speak. It's a fantastic and honestly, this is just the tip of the iceberg for me. There is a lot about this book I have enjoyed, and I think that anyone who has been following the series from the beginning might agree. Or maybe this title is not for everyone. Yet I like her here, and I think there is a story being told beneath the surface, you just have to be paying attention.

Edited by Power_Guy

@Babs said:

First, I apologize to anyone who believes this issue does not deserve all five of its stars, but I don't apologize for issuing them.

Second, I am pretty offended that there are people who believe that because a reviewer does not agree with his or her negative opinion of a comic that it must be because the creator of the series recently issued interviews with various news outlets and not because the reviewer genuinely enjoyed the book. I think one of the worst things a commentator in a forum can do is make accusations about a reviewer/journalist's integrity and I feel that there have been far too many instances where this sort of thing has so cavalierly been thrown about. So yeah, I take great offense to that.

If you had been following the series from the start, you would have a great appreciation for this issue/end of the arc, I think. This story was about betrayal, family and Wonder Woman's insistance in having faith in others, sometimes against her better judgement. Think back to the beginning of the series when Diana was lied to about who she is and where she had come from by her own Mother. Hippolyta and her Amazon "sisters" were the only family she had ever known, but they betrayed her, in a sense. She lost them all. That final page depicts a very unconventional family: a group of Olympus' rejects, Orion and Zola. Some of these characters found themselves at the opposite end of Diana's sword initially, but now here they are all together in the same room, crowding around a young child. They all have different reasons, motives for doing what they do, but in that moment their goals are the same and that has brought them together. It's a great moment that brings things full circle. Diana's goal this entire time has remained the same, and she inadvertently influenced the change in others. I found that compelling.

We've watched Diana experience tremendous betrayal, but she never stopped believing in the good that exists in people. War is a perfect example of this. As a young girl (issue 0) she learned from him, but the difference between them was her compassion. Now, the roles are reversed and War has learned to be compassionate from her. The teacher becomes the student, so to speak. It's a fantastic and honestly, this is just the tip of the iceberg for me. There is a lot about this book I have enjoyed, and I think that anyone who has been following the series from the beginning might agree. Or maybe this title is not for everyone. Yet I like her here, and I think there is a story being told beneath the surface, you just have to be paying attention.

Thank you for your reply Sara. I listen to your podcast quite often and you seem like a very nice, intelligent woman. I guess, that's part of the reason I have a hard time believing these reviews on Wonder Woman from you are 100% genuine. Before I say too much more about you specifically, I would like to point out that about 6 months ago, I believe it was Bleeding Cool, that reported that DC was utilizing "payola" initiatives such as previews and creator interviews to help coerce positive reviews from popular comic review sites. When you add that to the fact that it's well known that Wonder Woman as deep-discounted to retailers for approximately the first 6 months of the New 52, that could lead one to believe that if DC was utlizing "payola" initiatives on books, Wonder Woman could very likely be one of them. Plus, this book has dropped almost 6K in unit sales since last August which tells me that a large number of readers are not enjoying the book any more. Now, suddenly, DC releases interviews with Azzarello to yours and many other popular news sites yesterday which comes across as damage control to me.

As for yourself, I find it hard to believe that an intelligent woman such as yourself could really be enjoying this book due to the dark, perverse, and sexist tone of some of Azzarello's plot points. He felt the need to change Diana's origin from having only a female parent to now having a male father figure. That suggests that in order for Diana to be competent, she needed a male parent. Azzarello then revealed that it was Ares who trained Diana in combat, instead of the pre-New 52 concept of being trained by her Amazon sisters which suggests she could have only become this good of a warrior by being trained by a male. Azzarello also turned the Amazons from shining examples of feminine achievement and inspiration into man-killing, baby-trading savages. Add to these points, the recent "butt slap" by Orion and I have a hard time believing a woman could be comfortable with these things. At the same time, if you truly are enjoying this book, I'm happy for you but it still boggles my mind a bit.

Thanks again for your reply.

Posted by Gambit1024

Can Orion and Diana get married and have a million babies? That'd be rad, DC.

Posted by jointron33

Sexism? You feminists are stupid as hell.

Posted by RedQueen

@Ghidoran said:

I swear Wonder Woman fans are the absolute worst. They'll cry and moan if her tiara is the wrong shade of grey. Azzarello has made arguably the best comic of the New 52, the art is incredibly well done and matches the Greek style of old, the characters are fresh and interesting and the storytelling is top notch. But, wait, she's not the paragon of feminism like she was in the 50's, when women actually needed a figure like her? The comic sucks. She doesn't have the same old boring supporting cast of Steve Trevor and Etta Candy? The comic sucks. There's no invisible jets, magic potions or whatever stupid crap the Silver Age version of the character dealt with? The comic sucks.

I know people find it hard to accept change, but they've swallowed it, looked past their biases, and managed to enjoy most of the New 52. Wonder Woman fans, for some reason, are incredibly thick-headed and refuse to do so, continuously insulting and deriding the series even though it's been the best interpretation of the character since Rucka.

Hey,hey don't paint us all with the same brush. I love the book :)

Posted by Press Oblivion

@SNascimento said:

@Press Oblivion: I think you misunderstood the meaning of the "family portrait". The fact that people there are really not friends and there is so much mistrust and issues between them is what makes it so amazing. This is very much like how the olimpian family is portrayed in WW. But now it's... let's say, her family?

The panel is awesome because of everything it is, and at the sametime everything it is not.

If you perceive that I have misunderstood something, there is nothing that I care do to change that. There is no misunderstanding on my part, there is my opinion and I don't share your amazement. My issue is with Hera with regards to the family portrait and her role as a nonchalant supporting character as opposed to the antagonist she started out to as. I think I made that point clear. Again, while it may be a credit to Zola's & Diana's understanding and compassion I find it extremely distasteful considering how much suffering Hera has wrought especially to Diana. And everyone is OK with that? This is a plot point that has not been addressed to my satisfaction

I'm glad that you and so many others are enjoying the title, I was enjoying it too until issue 13 and beyond, because of slow pace and lack of exciting content.

@Babs said:

If you had been following the series from the start, you would have a great appreciation for this issue/end of the arc, I think. . . . and I think there is a story being told beneath the surface, you just have to be paying attention.

I have been reading this title from the beginning and my appreciation for the ending is far less compelling as you have found it to be. Perhaps your point in this sentence is in judgement of the intellect commenting in opposition to your perspective?

@Babs said:

Or maybe this title is not for everyone.

Perhaps that's why there is such a deep divide among Wonder Woman fans.

Posted by Ghidoran

@Power_Guy: @Power_Guy said:

Plus, this book has dropped almost 6K in unit sales since last August which tells me that a large number of readers are not enjoying the book any more. Now, suddenly, DC releases interviews with Azzarello to yours and many other popular news sites yesterday which comes across as damage control to me.

As for yourself, I find it hard to believe that an intelligent woman such as yourself could really be enjoying this book due to the dark, perverse, and sexist tone of some of Azzarello's plot points. He felt the need to change Diana's origin from having only a female parent to now having a male father figure. That suggests that in order for Diana to be competent, she needed a male parent. Azzarello then revealed that it was Ares who trained Diana in combat, instead of the pre-New 52 concept of being trained by her Amazon sisters which suggests she could have only become this good of a warrior by being trained by a male. Azzarello also turned the Amazons from shining examples of feminine achievement and inspiration into man-killing, baby-trading savages. Add to these points, the recent "butt slap" by Orion and I have a hard time believing a woman could be comfortable with these things. At the same time, if you truly are enjoying this book, I'm happy for you but it still boggles my mind a bit.

Thanks again for your reply.

Anyone who talks about sales when considering quality has immediately lost the argument. Sales have absolutely nothing to do with the quality of a book WHATSOEVER. There's a reason Superman and Detective comics are at the top of the sales charts, while I, Vampire and Dial H are not. Rises and falls in sales also say absolutely nothing. You need a degree in economics to be even begin to explain trends in sales patterns.

I have no idea why people keep arguing that Azzarello's book is somehow sexist. It does not portray women as being weak and needing men, and in fact some of the most dangerous characters in the book are female. "That suggests that in order for Diana to be competent, she needed a male parent." What? No, it doesn't. That's an insane assumption. That's you interpreting it as such because you need an excuse to attack the book. Nowhere in the last 19 issues has Diana had 'daddy issues' and there has certainly never been an indication that she needs a father figure. Your argument about her needing Ares is equally ridiculous. Of course she's gonna get trained by Ares, he's the freaking GOD OF WAR i.e. possibly the greatest warrior in the history of the Earth. Nothing about him training Diana is sexist, you're just interpreting that way for some stupid reason.

Yes, the Amazons are actually evil, or so we are told. As Babs mentioned, it was another aspect of Diana's story involving betrayal. She's forced to find a new family to connect with. Maybe some people think the Amazons are supposed to be the shining beacon of feminism or whatever, but the mythological basis is actually much closer to Azzarello's interpretation. Even before the New 52 the Amazons of Themyscira were criticized by many people for their isolationism and archaic views on gender. It's ironic that people are calling Azzarello's book sexist when the Amazons are probably the most sexist faction in the entire DCU.

I don't know how many women you know in real life but Orion's interaction with Diana is hardly cause for outrage, and no sane woman would be particularly uncomfortable with that kind of behaviour. Diana's intelligent and mature enough to not be bothered by it, though she even shows annoyance at Orion at times.

If people liking the book still 'boggles' your mind then maybe you're the one that needs to be more open-minded.

Well I am a WW fan too so yes, I am generalizing, but my statement was mostly referring to the die hard fanboys of the character who will call out anything that's different from their ideal version of the character and who refuse to even consider a new interpretation. Which is funny, considering how many different versions of the character there are.

Edited by Power_Guy

@Ghidoran said:

@Power_Guy: @Power_Guy said:

Plus, this book has dropped almost 6K in unit sales since last August which tells me that a large number of readers are not enjoying the book any more. Now, suddenly, DC releases interviews with Azzarello to yours and many other popular news sites yesterday which comes across as damage control to me.

As for yourself, I find it hard to believe that an intelligent woman such as yourself could really be enjoying this book due to the dark, perverse, and sexist tone of some of Azzarello's plot points. He felt the need to change Diana's origin from having only a female parent to now having a male father figure. That suggests that in order for Diana to be competent, she needed a male parent. Azzarello then revealed that it was Ares who trained Diana in combat, instead of the pre-New 52 concept of being trained by her Amazon sisters which suggests she could have only become this good of a warrior by being trained by a male. Azzarello also turned the Amazons from shining examples of feminine achievement and inspiration into man-killing, baby-trading savages. Add to these points, the recent "butt slap" by Orion and I have a hard time believing a woman could be comfortable with these things. At the same time, if you truly are enjoying this book, I'm happy for you but it still boggles my mind a bit.

Thanks again for your reply.

Anyone who talks about sales when considering quality has immediately lost the argument. Sales have absolutely nothing to do with the quality of a book WHATSOEVER. There's a reason Superman and Detective comics are at the top of the sales charts, while I, Vampire and Dial H are not. Rises and falls in sales also say absolutely nothing. You need a degree in economics to be even begin to explain trends in sales patterns.

I have no idea why people keep arguing that Azzarello's book is somehow sexist. It does not portray women as being weak and needing men, and in fact some of the most dangerous characters in the book are female. "That suggests that in order for Diana to be competent, she needed a male parent." What? No, it doesn't. That's an insane assumption. That's you interpreting it as such because you need an excuse to attack the book. Nowhere in the last 19 issues has Diana had 'daddy issues' and there has certainly never been an indication that she needs a father figure. Your argument about her needing Ares is equally ridiculous. Of course she's gonna get trained by Ares, he's the freaking GOD OF WAR i.e. possibly the greatest warrior in the history of the Earth. Nothing about him training Diana is sexist, you're just interpreting that way for some stupid reason.

Yes, the Amazons are actually evil, or so we are told. As Babs mentioned, it was another aspect of Diana's story involving betrayal. She's forced to find a new family to connect with. Maybe some people think the Amazons are supposed to be the shining beacon of feminism or whatever, but the mythological basis is actually much closer to Azzarello's interpretation. Even before the New 52 the Amazons of Themyscira were criticized by many people for their isolationism and archaic views on gender. It's ironic that people are calling Azzarello's book sexist when the Amazons are probably the most sexist faction in the entire DCU.

I don't know how many women you know in real life but Orion's interaction with Diana is hardly cause for outrage, and no sane woman would be particularly uncomfortable with that kind of behaviour. Diana's intelligent and mature enough to not be bothered by it, though she even shows annoyance at Orion at times.

If people liking the book still 'boggles' your mind then maybe you're the one that needs to be more open-minded.

Well I am a WW fan too so yes, I am generalizing, but my statement was mostly referring to the die hard fanboys of the character who will call out anything that's different from their ideal version of the character and who refuse to even consider a new interpretation. Which is funny, considering how many different versions of the character there are.

Look - it's obvious that you like the book and are willing to overlook anything in it that's sexist, perverse, or inappropriate in any way so that you can insult people like me and help Azzarello save face.

Let me tell you a little bit more about myself before you continue to group me in your category of "die hard fanboys of the character who will call out anything that's different from their ideal version of the character and who refuse to even consider a new interpretation." I've been a fan of Wonder Woman since the 70s. I've stuck by her through many changes including the Perez reboot, the 90s biker outfit & Artemis becoming Wonder Woman, Rucka's blinding of Diana, and even the recent JMS run. With the exceptions of Wonder Woman and the Teen Titans, I am enjoying most of the New 52. In fact, I'm collecting more books now than I was pre-New 52. I am not some tired old fan who refuses to let go of 1984.

The reason I don't care for Azzarello's run on Wonder Woman is because I find it is very disrespectful to the character and her creator. You said that Azzarello's Amazons are much closer to their mythological counterparts but that's not how Marston intended them to be. He wanted them to differ from their mythological savage counterparts and be shining examples of feminine insecurity and inspiration. Azzarello has also ignoreed many familiar aspects of Wonder Woman's world that I enjoy such as Steve Trevor, Etta Candy, Donna Troy, Nemesis, the Invisible Jet, the Cheetah, Giganta, Dr. Psycho, Circe, Dr. Poison, etc, all in favor of the Olympians who aren't even exclusive DC characters. If I wanted to read about the Olympians, I'd be reading Greek myth not a comic from a company that's known for publishing superhero comics.

I'm happy for you if you're enjoying this run but don't expect those of us who aren't to march along with you or keep quiet. We all have opinions. If you don't care for mine, don't read my posts.

Posted by Owie

@Babs: Babs, I just want to note that Chiang only penciled the last 3 pages of the comic (18-20). Goran Sudzuka pencilled 4-5, 8-10, and 13-17, while Tony Akins did 1-3, 6-7, and 11-12. The way you wrote the review, it makes it sound like Chiang (who I think is great) drew almost all of the book, and that there is only one artist besides him. This might be worth editing in the review?

That aside, I have to say this is the last issue I'll be getting of this book. I think the writing has been pretty good, and I love Chiang's take on WW, but the other artists they've had have been consistently subpar. In this issue, the art goes from subpar to simply atrocious. Sure, the 3 pages by Chaing are solid, as always, but look at the rest of it. Page 2, panel 1, is one of the worst things I've seen in professional comics. It looks like it was drawn by a fourth grader. This is closely followed by page 1 panel 1; page 2 panel 2; page 3 panel 2, page 3 panel 5...it just goes on and on. It makes it impossible for me to focus on the quality of the writing. I'm just sad they couldn't have Chiang for every issue.

Posted by impossibilly

@Power_Guy said:

Thank you for your reply Sara. I listen to your podcast quite often and you seem like a very nice, intelligent woman. I guess, that's part of the reason I have a hard time believing these reviews on Wonder Woman from you are 100% genuine. Before I say too much more about you specifically, I would like to point out that about 6 months ago, I believe it was Bleeding Cool, that reported that DC was utilizing "payola" initiatives such as previews and creator interviews to help coerce positive reviews from popular comic review sites.

I think it's fairly ridiculous that anyone who claims to listen to the podcast quite often would question 's integrity when it comes to reviews. DC Comics writer James Robinson is a regular guest on the podcast, but his Earth 2 series has only received a five star review from Sara twice over the 11 issues published so far. If Comic Vine was in DC's pocket, as you insinuate, wouldn't Earth 2 score higher much more often?

I like Sara's reviews. They're always well thought out and she backs up her star rating in the body of the review with specific reasons.

Wonder Woman has consistently been one of the best comics DC has produced since the start of New 52. It shouldn't be surprising to see any issue of it rate highly with a reviewer.

Not every reviewer is going to agree with the opinion you, I, or anyone else holds about a comic. That doesn't mean their reviews lack integrity.

Posted by Power_Guy

@impossibilly said:

@Power_Guy said:

Thank you for your reply Sara. I listen to your podcast quite often and you seem like a very nice, intelligent woman. I guess, that's part of the reason I have a hard time believing these reviews on Wonder Woman from you are 100% genuine. Before I say too much more about you specifically, I would like to point out that about 6 months ago, I believe it was Bleeding Cool, that reported that DC was utilizing "payola" initiatives such as previews and creator interviews to help coerce positive reviews from popular comic review sites.

I think it's fairly ridiculous that anyone who claims to listen to the podcast quite often would question 's integrity when it comes to reviews. DC Comics writer James Robinson is a regular guest on the podcast, but his Earth 2 series has only received a five star review from Sara twice over the 11 issues published so far. If Comic Vine was in DC's pocket, as you insinuate, wouldn't Earth 2 score higher much more often?

I like Sara's reviews. They're always well thought out and she backs up her star rating in the body of the review with specific reasons.

Wonder Woman has consistently been one of the best comics DC has produced since the start of New 52. It shouldn't be surprising to see any issue of it rate highly with a reviewer.

Not every reviewer is going to agree with the opinion you, I, or anyone else holds about a comic. That doesn't mean their reviews lack integrity.

Well if you think Wonder Woman has consistently been one of the best comics DC has produced since the start of the New 52 and I think it's one of the worst, that equals things out, doesn't it? :/