RideASpaceCowboy's forum posts

#1 Edited by RideASpaceCowboy (536 posts) - - Show Bio

Of the movies I've seen in theaters this year, my ordering would be...

  1. Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
  2. Godzilla
  3. The Lego Movie
  4. Captain America: The Winter Soldier
  5. Guardians of the Galaxy
  6. 22 Jump Street
  7. Neighbors
  8. X-Men: Days of Future Past
  9. Sin City: A Dame to Kill For
  10. Amazing Spider-Man 2
  11. Transformers: Age of Extinction
  12. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
  13. Hercules
  14. Robocop
  15. Let's Be Cops
  16. Tammy

Yes, I'm a cinephile.

#2 Edited by RideASpaceCowboy (536 posts) - - Show Bio

The Sentry

#3 Edited by RideASpaceCowboy (536 posts) - - Show Bio

This is the correct answer.

#4 Edited by RideASpaceCowboy (536 posts) - - Show Bio

I believe that the man who killed the watcher was none other than a time travelling Woodrow McCord, mere moments before his first encounter with Colonel Fury in 1958. Given that, like Fury after him, he was a "Man on the Wall," he would have had the skill and technology to accomplish such a feat, and would presumably have been aware of the Watcher's existence.

Furthermore, the significant amount of time expended on his introduction in issue #5 suggests he has a greater importance to the story of Original Sin than has yet to be revealed. It would also be appropriate that Original Sin #8, presumably Nick Fury's swan song, would focus on him discovering the truth about his predecessor and finally naming his successor, lending an appropriate thematic balance.

#5 Edited by RideASpaceCowboy (536 posts) - - Show Bio

This may very well have been the best issue of the best ongoing at Marvel right now.

This and Hickman's Avengers have been essentially the biggest and best event-comic Marvel has ever put out, and it's not even being marketed as such.

#7 Edited by RideASpaceCowboy (536 posts) - - Show Bio

Namor was wrong.

In your defense of him you assume a utilitarian ethos which pursuits “the greatest good for the greatest number.” If such were the correct moral principle, then such a conclusion would indeed be correct.

I argue, however, that a deontological ethos should be followed in moral decision making, in which all moral actions are considered in a vacuum. Thus the question “Is it wrong to murder a populated world” can never be qualified with “in order to….” The action is wrong, in and of itself, and therefore ought not to be committed.

A deontologist solves the Trolley problem by distinguishing between active and passive deeds. The act of preventing a trolley from running over five individuals is morally commendable, but not morally obligatory. The active deed may be praised, but the passive deed of allowing the individuals to die cannot be condemned. Inversely, when the active deed itself constitutes murder, as in the cases of switching the lever or dropping the fat man, then the active deed becomes morally condemnable, while the passive deed remains morally neutral, as in the first case.

When the Illuminati save one or more worlds, their actions are morally commendable.

When the Illuminati murder a populated world, their actions are morally condemnable.

When the Illuminati fail to save or murder a world, their actions (or lack thereof) are morally neutral, on the exact same moral level of everyone else on Earth-616 who failed to act in regards to the incursions.

The fate of the world is NOT in their hands, but the state of their souls IS in their hands. And the latter is infinitely more valuable than the former.

#8 Edited by RideASpaceCowboy (536 posts) - - Show Bio

Namor was wrong.

In your defense of him you assume a utilitarian ethos which pursuits “the greatest good for the greatest number.” If such were the correct moral principle, then such a conclusion would indeed be correct.

I argue, however, that a deontological ethos should be followed in moral decision making, in which all moral actions are considered in a vacuum. Thus the question “Is it wrong to murder a populated world” can never be qualified with “in order to….” The action is wrong, in and of itself, and therefore ought not to be committed.

A deontologist solves the Trolley problem by distinguishing between active and passive deeds. The act of preventing a trolley from running over five individuals is morally commendable, but not morally obligatory. The active deed may be praised, but the passive deed of allowing the individuals to die cannot be condemned. Inversely, when the active deed itself constitutes murder, as in the cases of switching the lever or dropping the fat man, then the active deed becomes morally condemnable, while the passive deed remains morally neutral, as in the first case.

When the Illuminati save one or more worlds, their actions are morally commendable.

When the Illuminati murder a populated world, their actions are morally condemnable.

When the Illuminati fail to save or murder a world, their actions (or lack thereof) are morally neutral, on the exact same moral level of everyone else on Earth-616 who failed to act in regards to the incursions.

The fate of the world is NOT in their hands, but the state of their souls IS in their hands. And the latter is infinitely more valuable than the former.

#9 Posted by RideASpaceCowboy (536 posts) - - Show Bio

Every week I hear questions from listeners asking you to help cull their pull lists, often for monetary reasons. While I myself have no spending limit on the comics I buy, at the same time I also want to be prudent with my money. Thus I recently changed my purchasing habits with regards to comics, and in the process started spending far less money while buying far more books. With the exception of a few select titles, most of the comics I buy are through Comixology's $.99 sales. These occur frequently enough that I'm never too far behind on series I'm interested in, they allow me to splurge on story lines as I do with Netflix or Hulu shows, and they're often relevantly timed around recently released movie or an upcoming event (I can't wait to get all of Uncanny Avengers right before Axis). DC almost always has a week long sale going on, and Marvel has sales every Monday and Friday (I recently got all of Guardians of the Galaxy vol. 2 for about $25 the day the movie came out, less than I spent at the theater). My 64 GB iPad can't even hold half of my comics anymore. Hopefully this helps your fellow listeners save some money and expand their digital collections.

#10 Posted by RideASpaceCowboy (536 posts) - - Show Bio

With this issue alone Namor is arguably the greatest villain in the history of the Marvel Universe.