Musings on Storm

I was meditating on race, sexism and how these play out in comics quite a few weeks ago. In truth, I was considering posting some form of blog post about this earlier, but lack of interest resulted in me putting this off for as long as possible. I was starting to think that I was simply taking these characters too seriously, that no one shared the discomfort that lead this character to go from being my favorite X-Man to simply being what I considered to be yet another idealized heroine in an adolescent power fantasy and because of these two things, there was no point in at least commenting on my reaction to the character.

This morning, I randomly stumbled upon this article http://digitalfemme.com/journal/index.php?itemid=1073by Cheryl Lynn, that was originally posted three years ago and commenting on how Storm can be seen as a racist fantasy. The article is basically about Storm's appearance and how she doesn't fit into any cultural context, despite having two parents of various degrees of African origin. Even more interesting is that the article references Byrne and Claremont's reaction to this critique and their rebuttal (http://i36.tinypic.com/1zxs5g0.gif). The fact that the author is a woman gives another element to this commentary, since the basic fact is that Storm can't quite be considered or claimed as a role model for girls in general nor black/brown skinned/African girls in particular. I've commented on this in various forums, but it bears repeating that Storm lives a fairy tale, her powers are somewhat interesting, she is lauded as beautiful, she became a queen, she is well-respected and she's often guilty of explicitly telling her opponents why she is better than they are. Per Chris Claremont, she was explicitly created to be very powerful in order to be an example of a strong woman, which was rare at the time. "But is it a fairy tale worth reading? Black women cannot live vicariously through Storm. She is the Black Fantasy Marvel spent more than two decades telling us we could never be. The fantasy is useless, for there is no comfort in engaging it. The character only serves to remind us of how short black women fall from the racist norms society demands we aspire to." (from Digital Femme).

What is interesting is that I've heard a similar story from the creators of Monica Rambeau. According to Roger Stern and John Romita, she was created to be a positive role model for girls and provide an example of a smart, successful and powerful African American heroine. The similarity to Storm ends there. Monica has decidedly African American features but her character traits don't revolve around her power set (which are amazing and on one of the higher tiers for an Earth-born hero, see link for additional feats http://hudlinentertainment.com/smf/index.php?topic=4156.0) - they revolve around positive personality traits: Rambeau's a character that has a strong need to do right, no matter where she is. Characters like Iron Man, Spider-Man, and Luke Cage needed a reason to become heroes. Rambeau, however, is more in the Captain America mold. Like Steve Rogers, she's driven to serve the public. While Captain America volunteered for a dangerous experiment to serve his country, Rambeau spent years serving as part of the New Orleans Harbor Patrol. Getting powers merely gave her another way to serve the public, and becoming the leader of the Avengers gave her yet another way to help. (from A Marvel Black History Lesson: http://marvel.com/news/story/15279/a_marvel_black_history_lesson_pt_2). Furthermore, she is a college and police academy graduate. Though artists and writers have experimented with her costume design and styling to various extents, the concept was that she was a beautiful (http://i92.photobucket.com/albums/l21/brownfox59/photonMonica07.jpg) recognizably dark-skinned woman of African descent who didn't need a connection to Africa or unconventional features to legitimize herself. This is her home and she is comfortable here. At one point, she was asked by She Hulk to drop by in order to meet Scarlet Witch, who was inactive at the time (link to image http://i576.photobucket.com/albums/ss206/ladylight/Avengersmonica8-5.jpg). She casually switches to French, which she learned in her home city of New Orleans, Louisiana, and she has a brief conversation with Wanda - the scene, and others such as an earlier impromptu visit to France, emphasized that she is cultured without being too heavy handed in its' depiction, and she is mature enough to recognize Scarlet Witch's service while having interpersonal skills to be friendly without trying too hard. In many ways, Monica Rambeau is a more successful character because it was the qualities that make her a superhero that took a priority over her appearance or cultural background.

Juxtapose this with Storm's inner monologue where she reveals that she is not comfortable with cities (http://i37.tinypic.com/5fp086.gif). While this opinion makes sense, given Storm's issues with claustrophobia and growing up in the country side, it does reveal that she neither embraces American culture nor does she feel any solidarity with other people of African descent living there. She was essentially walking through a poor community (one can assume that it was occupied by many minorities and marginalized people) and outright rejecting it. Storm is a character that had freedom to go anywhere she chose, and her choice was to go into a self-created ghetto, the X-Mansion, and was forced to embrace the label of outcast even though she was conventionally pretty and was depicted as getting compliments wherever she went, and could have been successful as a regular woman with a secret identity.

The point that Ms. Lynn brings up in her blog is that the major problem with Storm is that she represents an idealized version of woman, with no connection to either part of her ethnic background and no interest in investigating them. The point seems to be that she was created in a period of time by writers who, good intentions aside, never quite came to terms with the African part of her origin story, don't seem to have been aware of African history so despite setting aspects of her origin in Africa, never bothered exploring what this means until years later (for example, connecting Storm ancestors to Egyptian sorceresses instead of the Modjadi or the Rain Queens that ruled the indigenous people of the Balobedu which would have taught her readers something about the real world while legitimizing a possible source of her powers by grounding them in the real world) and who quite seriously didn't see anything wrong with creating an African/American character who more closely resembled a Nordic ideal of beauty than the people she was supposedly genetically related to (indeed, they responded to the criticism with annoyance by saying that they "envisioned primordial Eve to have silvery hair and blue eyes" not appreciating the irony that this was the Nordic ideal they were being accused of tapping into). What Ms. Lynn seems to be asking is a threefold question: Who is Storm supposed to inspire? Whose adolescent power fantasy is she a symbol of? And is it a worthwhile, healthy one? There seems to be an inherent aspect of racism with Storm because she seems to fill the image of what a "beautiful or acceptable" woman of African descent should look like and which has been perpetuated in the beauty industry via hair relaxers, blue contacts and skin lightening agents.

Children, young people and adults of all shapes, shades, sizes, sexes and orientation need to be inspired and comics offer examples of heroes while their primary purpose is entertainment - it's just questionable if some of the more popular characters inspire positive archetypes or negative stereotypes. Storm may simply be a male fantasy of the exotic but acceptably attractive female laid on top of some element of empowerment rather than an aspirational figure.

ETA: This is not meant to bash the character in any way, but offer some form of analysis as to what this character can mean to other people and examine the ambiguity she might represent to some people.

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Edited by butterflykyss

This article was a very interesting read. Reading this article reminded me of the short time Storm and BP spent with the FF. There was a scene where Thing grabs Storm by her locks (with her consent) in which she tells him that its not a weave and that it is real. Storm, by the description provided on Femme Fatale, would fit into what one would deem a "black fantasy." However, I am reluctant to agree that Storm represents a fantasy for women that they could never aspire to be. I feel, at least for me, that Storm can be looked at by young black girls in something they can aspire to be, much like Michele Obama in many ways. Being more cynical, one could say, that all superhero characters, white, black, etc., retain some elements or qualities that we could all never truly be. That said, in the context of race, I feel Storm has been characterized and shown in so many dimensions (in context to shade, and fullness of noise and lips) that she often times does transcend the ideals of what one would define as black.

However, black people are found in all shades with varying phenotypes. I would concur that the earlier showings could definitely fall into the category of what is described as "black fantasy." I am reminded of the dark phoenix saga, and mastermind is controlling jeans mind and her perception on how she perceives the X-men. The first panel shows Storm (unaltered) with a slim nose (typically not associated with African features), and then the second panel shows a "slave" version of Storm who has a broader nose (typically associated with Sub-Saharan African features). Is this by chance or does this somewhat point to what the artist perceived to be as less or something that is unattractive? Again, it's hard to really say. Storm for me at least, has always been black even with her features that some wouldn't necessarily identify with being black. For me, I have grown up around beautiful black women, who were of varying shades, varying hair textures, varying facial features, so I don't think Storm, in that context at least, represents something that black women can never attain (beauty). Nor do I think, in the context of her being queen, does that represent something that black girls can't obtain as well, especially when there are women around like Oprah, Whoopie Goldberg, and Michelle Obama. It was a very good read, thanks for the post!

Edited by Iamlovewithin500

I Think this person who posted the original blog about her being a  racial fantasy is just one of  of those over critical People who read too much into things.. 
Storm has always represented The Black race,her beauty is universal,but she definitely looks that of Black Woman.I mean really Skin cream,bleach,Relaxers..Contacts? 
 
That's over doing it. I'm a living example of how diverse our race can be genetically.There is no need to bleach,there is no need to use perms or straightener.I admit i get my hair pressed ,but But i don't use chemicals to alter it.My natural state of hair is wavy,but im still for the most part Black.Both of my parents are black,My grandma has grey eyes,my nephews and nieces have green eyes.I mean this just sounds like one of those bitter Black Women who can't find love or acceptance among themselves and most likely had bad experience,as far as self esteem goes...So in retaliation they take shots at some of the lighter African-Americans.(Trust, i deal with these type of girls all the time)  
 
BTW Bleaching???   Again Storm has had various shades of brown skin depicted by different artist and what not,but shes always remained dark skinned for the most part.and just to let you know there are MANY Africans with even finer features than Storm, especially East Africa.To name a few with classified Caucasian features. there are the Somalians, Egyptians, Ethiopians etc.. 
Have you seen Supermodel Iman? 
 
Storm has always had strong facial features,high cheek bones, full lips, Gorgeous Brown skin.. though sometimes her nose changes depending on the artist at the time, but I've seen her drawn with a fuller nose before though.
 
I mean Personally I've always identified with Storm at an early age, because being a black little girl,i knew she was somewhat like me and a strong role model. 
 
 

The point seems to be that she was created in a period of time by writers who, good intentions aside, never quite came to terms with the African part of her origin story, don't seem to have been aware of African history so despite setting aspects of her origin in Africa, never bothered exploring what this means until years later (for example, connecting Storm ancestors to Egyptian sorceresses instead of the Modjadi or the Rain Queens that ruled the indigenous people of the Balobedu which would have taught her readers something about the real world while legitimizing a possible source of her powers by grounding them in the real world) 

Yes but this is where you are wrong.Her whole life growing up on the Serengeti,being surrounded by her people and being a Tribal Patron,she constantly was surrounded by African culture.Traveling around Africa with T'challa at a young age,Im pretty sure was exposed to different tribes and groups,not just her own native Kenya.Also growing up partially in Egypt during her childhood years; she had another type of African based culture around her(even though Egypt is mostly Arabic now
 
 
You fail to realize that Storm came to terms with all these things later on in life , because she was separated from all her family..ON BOTH SIDES.Storm's mother died when she was young.She knew nothing of her Mothers history or family for that matter.She probably didn't know where to find them or where to start until she became older.All she knew was that she was the daughter of a Kenyan Princess,Im not even sure she specifically knew the Kingdom she derived from.. until recently. Same goes for her American side too.
 So I respectfully Disagree, think she has come to terms with her African Origin just fine.  
  
 


   

Storm's inner monologue where she reveals that she is not comfortable with cities . While this opinion makes sense, given Storm's issues with claustrophobia and growing up in the country side, it does reveal that she neither embraces American culture nor does she feel any solidarity with other people of African descent living there. She was essentially walking through a poor community (one can assume that it was occupied by many minorities and marginalized people) and outright rejecting it. 


Oh laaawdy..Don't get me started  @PhoenixoftheTides:  
 
I've been to the hood(A.K.A the Ghetto) Who doesn't reject or wanna get out of it. High crime rate,poverty,etc.. 
Please don't make me go to the obvious.Its not  that she rejects her people,she rejects that form of living,and I do too. 
 
 
I love Ororo and all that she stands for.I'm Black Descendant,Female and successful In life...I see nothing wrong with her character aspects.
Posted by THUNDERBOLT30

@Iamlovewithin500 said:

I Think this person who posted the original blog about her being racial fantasy is just one of one of those over critical People who read too much into things..
Storm has always represented The Black race,her beauty is universal,but she definitely looks that of Black Woman.I mean really Skin cream,bleach,Relaxers..Contacts?

That's over doing it. I'm a living example of how diverse our race can be genetically.There is no need to bleach,there is no need to use perms or straightener.I admit i get my hair pressed ,but But i don't use chemicals to alter it.My natural state of hair is wavy,but im still for the most part Black.Both of my parents are black,My grandma has grey eyes,my nephews and nieces have green eyes.I mean this just sounds like one of those bitter Black Women who can't find love or acceptance among themselves and most likely had bad experience,as far as self esteem goes.So in retaliation they take shots at some of the lighter African-Americans.(Trust, i deal with these type of girls all the time)

BTW Bleaching??? Again Storm has had various shades of brow skin depicted by different artist and what not,but shes always remained dark skinned for the most part.and just to let you know there are MANY Africans with even finer features than Storm, especially East Africa.To name a few with classified Caucasian features. there are Somalians, Egyptians, Ethiopians etc..
Have you seen Supermodel Iman?

Storm has always had strong facial features,high cheek bones,full lips, Gorgeous Brown skin.. though her nose changes depending on the artist at the time,I've seen her drawn with a fuller nose before though.

I mean Personally I've always identified with Storm at an early age, because being a black little girl,i knew she was somewhat like me and a strong role model.


The point seems to be that she was created in a period of time by writers who, good intentions aside, never quite came to terms with the African part of her origin story, don't seem to have been aware of African history so despite setting aspects of her origin in Africa, never bothered exploring what this means until years later (for example, connecting Storm ancestors to Egyptian sorceresses instead of the Modjadi or the Rain Queens that ruled the indigenous people of the Balobedu which would have taught her readers something about the real world while legitimizing a possible source of her powers by grounding them in the real world)

Yes but this is were you are wrong.Her whole life growing up on the Serengeti,being surrounded by her people and being a Tribal Patron,she constantly was surrounded by African culture.Traveling around Africa with T'challa at a young age,Im pretty sure was exposed to different tribes and groups,not just her own native Kenya.Also growing up partially in Egypt during her childhood years he had another type of African based culture around here(even though Egypt is mostly Arabic now)


You fail to realize that Storm came to terms with all these things later on in life , because she was separated from all her family..ON BOTH SIDES.Storm mother died when she was young.She knew nothing of her Mothers history or family for that matter.She probably didn't know where to find them or where to start until she became older.All she knew was that she was the daughter of a Kenyan Princess,Im not even sure she specifically knew the Kingdom she derived from.. until recently. Same goes for her American side too.
So I respectfully Disagree, I think she has come to terms with her African Origin just fine.





Storm's inner monologue where she reveals that she is not comfortable with cities . While this opinion makes sense, given Storm's issues with claustrophobia and growing up in the country side, it does reveal that she neither embraces American culture nor does she feel any solidarity with other people of African descent living there. She was essentially walking through a poor community (one can assume that it was occupied by many minorities and marginalized people) and outright rejecting it.


Oh laaawdy..Don't get me started @PhoenixoftheTides: I've been to the hood(A.K.A the Ghetto) Who doesn't reject or wanna get out of it. High crime rate,poverty,etc.. Please don't make me go to the obvious.Its not that she rejects her people,she rejects that from of living,and i do to. I love Ororo and that she stands for.I'm Black Descendant,Female and successful In life.

LOL....well stated and co-signed. The article is interesting but it's pretty clear, seeing that Storm's fan base has been pretty diverse, plenty of people identify with the character irrespective of how her origin has been presented.

Edited by PhoenixoftheTides

Well, to be fair, some of the articles by David Brothers from the 4thletter! that Ms. Lynn was referencing really go into the entire history of the character, whereas I was looking at the difficulties writing this character in her first few appearances and whether it was as successful as it could have been. These brief articles elaborate on these points: http://www.4thletter.net/2008/02/black-history-month-25-halle-berry-no-surprise/ & http://www.4thletter.net/2007/01/she-got-that-good-hair-top-5-3-black-women/. I can't say I know Ms. Lynn personally (she's obviously a comic fan who goes out of her way to support black creative teams, so her hyper criticism may have more to do with the industry itself), but as an African American gay male from a Caribbean family who grew up in the "ghetto" and was considered attractive enough to work as a male model for quite a few years, neither I nor any of the writers I referenced is saying that African or African American women have to have the same features or colored skin to be part of some pseudo monolithic African or African American culture. What they specifically found problematic were panels like the one Ms. Lynn had posted, where some onlookers basically said Storm didn't look like she belonged to any existing race, and their own feelings when they had initially identified with the character because they thought she was supposed to be a role model for them. Anyway, you might pick this up more clearly from the 4thletter! blog, but most of these commenters are fans, as well. This post is more about why some readers and comic fans have an ambiguous relationship with her.

Posted by jhazzroucher

For me , Storm is more relatable cos she doesn't only inspire women only but men too and everybody else. She represents people who didn't have parents since they were young. I believe it's a tragic and traumatic experience having no parents.

Storm also inspires people who do wrong things that they can still change their destiny and make things right. Storm was once a thief but she has a good heart and eventually became a hero.

Storm represents people who are different cos well she has white hair and her friends kept on teasing her that she wasn't one of their kinds. I know how it feels to be teased and humiliated.

Storm represents poor people cos well, she has experience a rough life when she was a little girl, no parents, no home, etc.

Storm represents leaders, she has been a leader and a good one. She may be powerful and capable of destroying the entire planet, kill criminals just by sensing their location, but for her, violence is not the answer.

Storm also represents the royal family, that despite of being a princess herself, she doesn't want to be treated like one, because for her all people are equal.

Posted by butterflykyss

@jhazzroucher said:

For me , Storm is more relatable cos she doesn't only inspire women only but men too and everybody else. She represents people who didn't have parents since they were young. I believe it's a tragic and traumatic experience having no parents.

Storm also inspires people who do wrong things that they can still change their destiny and make things right. Storm was once a thief but she has a good heart and eventually became a hero.

Storm represents people who are different cos well she has white hair and her friends kept on teasing her that she wasn't one of their kinds. I know how it feels to be teased and humiliated.

Storm represents poor people cos well, she has experience a rough life when she was a little girl, no parents, no home, etc.

Storm represents leaders, she has been a leader and a good one. She may be powerful and capable of destroying the entire planet, kill criminals just by sensing their location, but for her, violence is not the answer.

Storm also represents the royal family, that despite of being a princess herself, she doesn't want to be treated like one, because for her all people are equal.

Well said Jhazz, but what are your thoughts on the idea of race and what she represents?

Posted by jhazzroucher

@butterflykyss said:

@jhazzroucher said:

For me , Storm is more relatable cos she doesn't only inspire women only but men too and everybody else. She represents people who didn't have parents since they were young. I believe it's a tragic and traumatic experience having no parents.

Storm also inspires people who do wrong things that they can still change their destiny and make things right. Storm was once a thief but she has a good heart and eventually became a hero.

Storm represents people who are different cos well she has white hair and her friends kept on teasing her that she wasn't one of their kinds. I know how it feels to be teased and humiliated.

Storm represents poor people cos well, she has experience a rough life when she was a little girl, no parents, no home, etc.

Storm represents leaders, she has been a leader and a good one. She may be powerful and capable of destroying the entire planet, kill criminals just by sensing their location, but for her, violence is not the answer.

Storm also represents the royal family, that despite of being a princess herself, she doesn't want to be treated like one, because for her all people are equal.

Well said Jhazz, but what are your thoughts on the idea of race and what she represents?

it's my lunch break and i need to go back t0o work. later : )

Posted by butterflykyss

@jhazzroucher: oh ok.. ciao!!! :)

Posted by lykopis

@jhazzroucher said:

For me , Storm is more relatable cos she doesn't only inspire women only but men too and everybody else. She represents people who didn't have parents since they were young. I believe it's a tragic and traumatic experience having no parents.

Storm also inspires people who do wrong things that they can still change their destiny and make things right. Storm was once a thief but she has a good heart and eventually became a hero.

Storm represents people who are different cos well she has white hair and her friends kept on teasing her that she wasn't one of their kinds. I know how it feels to be teased and humiliated.

Storm represents poor people cos well, she has experience a rough life when she was a little girl, no parents, no home, etc.

Storm represents leaders, she has been a leader and a good one. She may be powerful and capable of destroying the entire planet, kill criminals just by sensing their location, but for her, violence is not the answer.

Storm also represents the royal family, that despite of being a princess herself, she doesn't want to be treated like one, because for her all people are equal.

These are reasons why I liked Storm as well. As a young girl - my impression of her wasn't so much as a black woman, but as a woman who commanded and deserved respect. That's not to say I wasn't aware of her ethnicity - she was the only black woman at the time that I saw in comics (although now I know there were more) and it was great to see. I'm not black, but for me, her having blue eyes and bleach white hair is no more different than Rogue with her white streak or Gambit with his red irises and black sclera. I didn't think it "whitened" her at all.

Interesting blog - very thorough and informative. Thank you.

Posted by jhazzroucher

@lykopis said:

@jhazzroucher said:

For me , Storm is more relatable cos she doesn't only inspire women only but men too and everybody else. She represents people who didn't have parents since they were young. I believe it's a tragic and traumatic experience having no parents.

Storm also inspires people who do wrong things that they can still change their destiny and make things right. Storm was once a thief but she has a good heart and eventually became a hero.

Storm represents people who are different cos well she has white hair and her friends kept on teasing her that she wasn't one of their kinds. I know how it feels to be teased and humiliated.

Storm represents poor people cos well, she has experience a rough life when she was a little girl, no parents, no home, etc.

Storm represents leaders, she has been a leader and a good one. She may be powerful and capable of destroying the entire planet, kill criminals just by sensing their location, but for her, violence is not the answer.

Storm also represents the royal family, that despite of being a princess herself, she doesn't want to be treated like one, because for her all people are equal.

These are reasons why I liked Storm as well. As a young girl - my impression of her wasn't so much as a black woman, but as a woman who commanded and deserved respect. That's not to say I wasn't aware of her ethnicity - she was the only black woman at the time that I saw in comics (although now I know there were more) and it was great to see. I'm not black, but for me, her having blue eyes and bleach white hair is no more different than Rogue with her white streak or Gambit with his red irises and black sclera. I didn't think it "whitened" her at all.

Interesting blog - very thorough and informative. Thank you.

True. I'm not black as well and what really inspires me is to become a good citizen, son, brother, friend because if i maintain that, i feel myself a superhero too, in my own way.

I also like her being different and unique. (Check Storm volume 2 #1-6, especially #1 ) I was also being teased by people, friends and even my family. It really hurts being teased telling that i'm different, ugly, dumb, etc.

Posted by butterflykyss

@jhazzroucher said:

@lykopis said:

@jhazzroucher said:

For me , Storm is more relatable cos she doesn't only inspire women only but men too and everybody else. She represents people who didn't have parents since they were young. I believe it's a tragic and traumatic experience having no parents.

Storm also inspires people who do wrong things that they can still change their destiny and make things right. Storm was once a thief but she has a good heart and eventually became a hero.

Storm represents people who are different cos well she has white hair and her friends kept on teasing her that she wasn't one of their kinds. I know how it feels to be teased and humiliated.

Storm represents poor people cos well, she has experience a rough life when she was a little girl, no parents, no home, etc.

Storm represents leaders, she has been a leader and a good one. She may be powerful and capable of destroying the entire planet, kill criminals just by sensing their location, but for her, violence is not the answer.

Storm also represents the royal family, that despite of being a princess herself, she doesn't want to be treated like one, because for her all people are equal.

These are reasons why I liked Storm as well. As a young girl - my impression of her wasn't so much as a black woman, but as a woman who commanded and deserved respect. That's not to say I wasn't aware of her ethnicity - she was the only black woman at the time that I saw in comics (although now I know there were more) and it was great to see. I'm not black, but for me, her having blue eyes and bleach white hair is no more different than Rogue with her white streak or Gambit with his red irises and black sclera. I didn't think it "whitened" her at all.

Interesting blog - very thorough and informative. Thank you.

True. I'm not black as well and what really inspires me is to become a good citizen, son, brother, friend because if i maintain that, i feel myself a superhero too, in my own way.

I also like her being different and unique. (Check Storm volume 2 #1-6, especially #1 ) I was also being teased by people, friends and even my family. It really hurts being teased telling that i'm different, ugly, dumb, etc.

this is what makes storm so special, because all races, genders, can embrace or find something about her in which they can aspire to be.

Posted by jhazzroucher

@butterflykyss said:

@jhazzroucher said:

@lykopis said:

@jhazzroucher said:

For me , Storm is more relatable cos she doesn't only inspire women only but men too and everybody else. She represents people who didn't have parents since they were young. I believe it's a tragic and traumatic experience having no parents.

Storm also inspires people who do wrong things that they can still change their destiny and make things right. Storm was once a thief but she has a good heart and eventually became a hero.

Storm represents people who are different cos well she has white hair and her friends kept on teasing her that she wasn't one of their kinds. I know how it feels to be teased and humiliated.

Storm represents poor people cos well, she has experience a rough life when she was a little girl, no parents, no home, etc.

Storm represents leaders, she has been a leader and a good one. She may be powerful and capable of destroying the entire planet, kill criminals just by sensing their location, but for her, violence is not the answer.

Storm also represents the royal family, that despite of being a princess herself, she doesn't want to be treated like one, because for her all people are equal.

These are reasons why I liked Storm as well. As a young girl - my impression of her wasn't so much as a black woman, but as a woman who commanded and deserved respect. That's not to say I wasn't aware of her ethnicity - she was the only black woman at the time that I saw in comics (although now I know there were more) and it was great to see. I'm not black, but for me, her having blue eyes and bleach white hair is no more different than Rogue with her white streak or Gambit with his red irises and black sclera. I didn't think it "whitened" her at all.

Interesting blog - very thorough and informative. Thank you.

True. I'm not black as well and what really inspires me is to become a good citizen, son, brother, friend because if i maintain that, i feel myself a superhero too, in my own way.

I also like her being different and unique. (Check Storm volume 2 #1-6, especially #1 ) I was also being teased by people, friends and even my family. It really hurts being teased telling that i'm different, ugly, dumb, etc.

this is what makes storm so special, because all races, genders, can embrace or find something about her in which they can aspire to be.

all i need now is to have now is the power to manipulate the elements. hehehe : )

Posted by butterflykyss

@jhazzroucher: yes if only i could as well lol

Posted by jhazzroucher

@butterflykyss said:

@jhazzroucher: yes if only i could as well lol

and by the way, my ex-girlfriend's voice sounded like Storm's. I didn't tell her though that i like Storm a lot cos it's kinda awkward. hehehe. : )

@Iamlovewithin500: I agree with you. The first time i saw Storm, i know she is african.

Posted by butterflykyss

@jhazzroucher said:

@butterflykyss said:

@jhazzroucher: yes if only i could as well lol

and by the way, my ex-girlfriend's voice sounded like Storm's. I didn't tell her though that i like Storm a lot cos it's kinda awkward. hehehe. : )

@Iamlovewithin500: I agree with you. The first time i saw Storm, i know she is african.

oh very nice lol.. do you call her sometimes just to hear her voice? LOL

Posted by jhazzroucher

@butterflykyss said:

@jhazzroucher said:

@butterflykyss said:

@jhazzroucher: yes if only i could as well lol

and by the way, my ex-girlfriend's voice sounded like Storm's. I didn't tell her though that i like Storm a lot cos it's kinda awkward. hehehe. : )

@Iamlovewithin500: I agree with you. The first time i saw Storm, i know she is african.

oh very nice lol.. do you call her sometimes just to hear her voice? LOL

well, I'm not the type of guy who calls and I am where she isn't

Posted by butterflykyss

@jhazzroucher said:

@butterflykyss said:

@jhazzroucher said:

@butterflykyss said:

@jhazzroucher: yes if only i could as well lol

and by the way, my ex-girlfriend's voice sounded like Storm's. I didn't tell her though that i like Storm a lot cos it's kinda awkward. hehehe. : )

@Iamlovewithin500: I agree with you. The first time i saw Storm, i know she is african.

oh very nice lol.. do you call her sometimes just to hear her voice? LOL

well, I'm not the type of guy who calls and I am where she isn't

oh thats not nice :(

Posted by jhazzroucher

I really think that the writer who made the article should redo the article.

Posted by butterflykyss

@jhazzroucher said:

I really think that the writer who made the article should redo the article.

why? i mean their perspective, though it is different from yours, is not less valid or moreso because of this difference. I like blogs like this because it allows us to be reflective in a way and also allows us to see things from every perspective. though i don't agree with everything that was stated, i definitely appreciate the honest look at a character that I have grown to love and still do.

Posted by jhazzroucher

@butterflykyss said:

@jhazzroucher said:

I really think that the writer who made the article should redo the article.

why? i mean their perspective, though it is different from yours, is not less valid or moreso because of this difference. I like blogs like this because it allows us to be reflective in a way and also allows us to see things from every perspective. though i don't agree with everything that was stated, i definitely appreciate the honest look at a character that I have grown to love and still do.

I know but it sounded very negative and the writer tends to make the positive views on Storm sound negative, like "she's only like that but not really like that" or after saying something positive, she'll continue with a negative comment. If there are negative stuff about a certain character, the writer shouldn't make it sound really, really bad.

For example if i say something about Cyclops like "he prefers to kill to survive and I understand his point because it is also for the survival of their kind...." it should be stated that way, not like how she has written about Storm.

Edited by PhoenixoftheTides

@butterflykyss said:

this is what makes storm so special, because all races, genders, can embrace or find something about her in which they can aspire to be.

Thank you for your thoughtful and fair response, and thanks everyone for having the patience to read the various articles. This is why I think Storm is such an interesting comic character to look at critically. She has fans because she's a successful superhero, first and foremost - not necessarily as a poster child for any one group.

Posted by butterflykyss

@PhoenixoftheTides said:

@butterflykyss said:

this is what makes storm so special, because all races, genders, can embrace or find something about her in which they can aspire to be.

Thank you for your thoughtful and fair response, and thanks everyone for having the patience to read the various articles. This is why I think Storm is such an interesting comic character to look at critically. She has fans because she's a successful superhero, first and foremost - not necessarily as a poster child for any one group.

oh no thank you. the article was quite interesting and i can understand her perspective definitely. :)

Posted by jhazzroucher

@butterflykyss said:

@PhoenixoftheTides said:

@butterflykyss said:

this is what makes storm so special, because all races, genders, can embrace or find something about her in which they can aspire to be.

Thank you for your thoughtful and fair response, and thanks everyone for having the patience to read the various articles. This is why I think Storm is such an interesting comic character to look at critically. She has fans because she's a successful superhero, first and foremost - not necessarily as a poster child for any one group.

oh no thank you. the article was quite interesting and i can understand her perspective definitely. :)

Thanks for sharing the article PhoenixoftheTides. : )

Posted by butterflykyss

@jhazzroucher said:

@butterflykyss said:

@PhoenixoftheTides said:

@butterflykyss said:

this is what makes storm so special, because all races, genders, can embrace or find something about her in which they can aspire to be.

Thank you for your thoughtful and fair response, and thanks everyone for having the patience to read the various articles. This is why I think Storm is such an interesting comic character to look at critically. She has fans because she's a successful superhero, first and foremost - not necessarily as a poster child for any one group.

oh no thank you. the article was quite interesting and i can understand her perspective definitely. :)

Thanks for sharing the article PhoenixoftheTides. : )

:)