Cheesy??

This isn't meant as a complaint, but more of an observation that I'm sure has been pointed out by many a comic book reader.   
 
I am in the process of reading Amazing Spider-Man #1-20 since I finally got the Marvel Masterworks stuff, and they are a really hard read.  They're not boring, and I understand the difference in the times, but I have come to the conclusion that my biggest bother is the fact that Stan Lee found it necessary to point out every time Spider-Man or the villains were about to do something.  It's almost as if he felt people aren't smart enough to pick up on what is happening from the art.  I find it kind of insulting, but more than anything, I find it extremely annoying.   
 
Maybe I'm alone in this, maybe I'm gonna take a lot of heat from this, but that's just how I feel.  Now, I do enjoy the issues and I enjoy Lee's writing (for what it's worth), they just take way too long to finish....  

9 Comments
9 Comments
Posted by MattDemers

@omertalvendetta said:

I have come to the conclusion that my biggest bother is the fact that Stan Lee found it necessary to point out every time Spider-Man or the villains were about to do something. It's almost as if he felt people aren't smart enough to pick up on what is happening from the art. I find it kind of insulting, but more than anything, I find it extremely annoying.

That's kinda just Stan Lee, to be honest.

Posted by JediXMan
@mattdemers
 
And most Silver Age and Bronze Age comics, really. 
 
Read some modern stuff. Sure, some stuff is cheesy, but most aren't.
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Posted by FadeToBlackBolt

I have the same problem trying to read Claremont's old X-Men stuff. 
 
It feels like a bad anime, where half the issue is just explaining what happened last time. The constant narrations become extremely jarring.

Posted by SC

Yes, but you having to point this out about those older comics when its sort of obvious, I mean I already know this, so your pointing this out sort of feels like your insulting my intelligence I mean... annoying as well, and...  
 
Nah lol, just kidding. Comics try to be layered, and I look at it this way, in those times, they were mainly for kids with a deeper adult subtext, and these days they try and aim for an older audience. Oh actually I find a lot of modern writers having as many annoying writing tics... 

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Posted by pikahyper

I gave up reading comics published before 1980 for that exact reason like six or seven years ago, there are a few series that I make exceptions for like old DC war comics (Star Spangled War Stories, Unknown Soldier, Sgt. Rock, etc), old kids comics (mostly Disney type stuff) and eventually I plan on reading some Gold Key/Dell stuff like Tarzan, Turok, Magnus, Solar, etc. Further you go back the harder they are to read and I'm sure as I get older that 1980 wall will move up to a 1990 wall cause even some of that stuff is getting harder to read, early Image comes to mind.

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Posted by Avenging-X-Bolt
@mattdemers said:

@omertalvendetta said:

I have come to the conclusion that my biggest bother is the fact that Stan Lee found it necessary to point out every time Spider-Man or the villains were about to do something. It's almost as if he felt people aren't smart enough to pick up on what is happening from the art. I find it kind of insulting, but more than anything, I find it extremely annoying.

That's kinda just Stan Lee, to be honest.


this. 
 
me, im into to all that dynamic, cheesy stuff. but im just a big theatrics guy
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Posted by Omertalvendetta
@SC: What modern writers would you say have tics and what are they?  I'm honestly curious.  
Posted by UltraHeroix

It's a different era when comics were read predominately by kids so I understand that things literally had to be spoon fed to be able to follow along.

Posted by SC
@omertalvendetta said:
@SC: What modern writers would you say have tics and what are they?  I'm honestly curious.  
 
Bendis can often have characters repeat, or use the same words as other characters, under his own pen, like woof, lol and Fraction can do something similar. Repetitive dialogue. His Psylocke I think racked up, like 20 "As you wish" quotes. Bendis often employs Mamet speech. Due to the idea, that every issue may be some ones first, characters still often will reference the relationships they have with characters when they might not if it was real life. Quicksilver probably doesn't need to keep reminding those close to him that Magneto is his father, so in a conversation about Magneto etc but that's more common and less idiosyncratic.
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