Nocturama's forum posts

#1 Posted by Nocturama (8 posts) - - Show Bio

If someone has already mentioned, this I must have missed their post, but Squire will most likely be the new Robin. What with Knight being killed two issues earlier, Batman, Inc. has left Batman without a Robin and Squire without her "Batman" in the very same story arc, obviously Morrison has set it up as a fait accompli. Batman will take in the distraught Beryl Hutchinson, who has often been referred to as the "Robin" of England. Squire even has the meta ability to interpret information by touch, which only enhances her usefulness in detective work and she will probably find herself drawn into a new case while living at Wayne Manor. Of course, despite some initial resistance from Batman, she'll eventually don the Robin suit in one form or another and he'll tell her she's got some big shoes to fill, etc. That is, until...Damian is revived in the Lazarus Pit and comes back EVIL!!!!

#2 Posted by Nocturama (8 posts) - - Show Bio
@Foolkiller
Obviously you're privy to information that I am not - what is your source? I have based what I've written by reading Justice League #1 and coming to a conclusion based on what is offered. If what you say is bona fide fact, then I could see being more willing to hope for the best and keep reading DC. 
#3 Posted by Nocturama (8 posts) - - Show Bio

I see that you have taken it upon yourself to make this very same comment every place that it fits the topic, which is obviously an opinion that now defines you, despite your stated temporay panic not so long ago. OK, maybe I haven't been reading DC since 1938, but I have been enjoying what I have been reading for the last 26 years since Crisis On Infinite Earths and I will miss all that has accumulated in those intervening years. My real question to someone like yourself , who apparantly has been enmeshed in the DC Universe for far longer than myself: Why wont you miss that history, that vast tapestry that is the background of all that is the DC Universe as we know it until now? As a longtime DC reader, don't you get any satisfaction from knowing what a reference to a past event means without having to look it up or ask someone? Does any of it have any value now that it doesn't matter? Metaphorically, this reboot is like dating a girl who looks just like your ex, whom you really loved, but with no shared experiences that made you fall in love with her in the first place.
#4 Posted by Nocturama (8 posts) - - Show Bio

Not true at all. I wouldn't have paid for all 52 issues sight unseen if I had that mindset.  
#5 Posted by Nocturama (8 posts) - - Show Bio

Yeah, an  Earth One line of titles would have been a good place to play with alternate takes on existing characters.
#6 Posted by Nocturama (8 posts) - - Show Bio

Regarding Justice League #1, I have to say that I am disappointed in DC's decision to re-invent it's universe rather than build on decades of storytelling that means so much to so many. This revisionist do-over for the benefit of a sure to be fleeting profit burst is a misjudgment that will likely rival the introduction of New Coke to a dumbfounded and offended populace back in the mid-1980's. Of course, New Coke was swiftly followed by Classic Coke and I expect just as much the same response when from DC when the sales for the "new fall line" go flat - I predict sometime around this time next year, just in time for heavy promotion at the next SDCC. The negating of all that has happened, erasing all the Crisis', undoing the depth of the relationships formed by experiences between so many well-defined characters, seems to be the core directive of Justice League #1. When author Geoff John's takes away the justifiable antipathy between Bruce Wayne and Hal Jordan, a rage forged in mistrust for Jordan's actions as Parallax and replace it with shallow territorial squabbling, all I see is sloppy empty writing straight out of Twilight's butt-sniffing alpha-male posturing. When Superman is suddenly an unknown a mere 5 years ago I can't help but be taken out of the narrative and ask "When five years ago?" During the waning years of the Bush administration 5 years ago or just some nebulous "whenever" time in fictionville. Honestly, why bother placing the action in any specific timeline when 5 years ago DC was doing some pretty interesting stuff with the a series named "52", the one that led to Countdown and Final Crisis and then Blackest Night, etc.? If it only makes you think of better comics than the one in your hand you know something is wrong with this picture, never mind that you'll still have to slog through the other 51 titles because your comcishop gave you a good deal on buying them all for $100 (a bit cheaper than just buying the 34 you had in mind). The stated object of the new 52 titles is to appeal to new (younger) readers, if that is truly the case and not just a revenue peak in an otherwise flaccid fiscal quarter, then my suggestion is they should have done what Marvel did with it's Ultimate line of books; create an EXTREEME, amped up, simplistically written enough to be translated into movies, multi-culty, dude-friendly super-quick read alternative line of books instead of throwing the baby out with the bath water. Better yet, with the dwindling attention span of most  younger people, who if they don't already read comics will never do so, no matter what the publishers do, why not put it on Twitter? At 160 characters an issue, I think the basic emotional, physical and narrative content of Justice League #1 could easily be displayed, for a monthly subscription rate that's less than a Happy Meal.
#7 Posted by Nocturama (8 posts) - - Show Bio

Regarding Justice League #1, I have to say that I am disappointed in DC's decision to re-invent it's universe rather than build on decades of storytelling that means so much to so many. This revisionist do-over for the benefit of a sure to be fleeting profit burst is a misjudgment that will likely rival the introduction of New Coke to a dumbfounded and offended populace back in the mid-1980's. Of course, New Coke was swiftly followed by Classic Coke and I expect just as much the same response when from DC when the sales for the "new fall line" go flat - I predict sometime around this time next year, just in time for heavy promotion at the next SDCC. The negating of all that has happened, erasing all the Crisis', undoing the depth of the relationships formed by experiences between so many well-defined characters, seems to be the core directive of Justice League #1. When author Geoff John's takes away the justifiable antipathy between Bruce Wayne and Hal Jordan, a rage forged in mistrust for Jordan's actions as Parallax and replace it with shallow territorial squabbling, all I see is sloppy empty writing straight out of Twilight's butt-sniffing alpha-male posturing. When Superman is suddenly an unknown a mere 5 years ago I can't help but be taken out of the narrative and ask "When five years ago?" During the waning years of the Bush administration 5 years ago or just some nebulous "whenever" time in fictionville. Honestly, why bother placing the action in any specific timeline when 5 years ago DC was doing some pretty interesting stuff with the a series named "52", the one that led to Countdown and Final Crisis and then Blackest Night, etc.? If it only makes you think of better comics than the one in your hand you know something is wrong with this picture, never mind that you'll still have to slog through the other 51 titles because your comcishop gave you a good deal on buying them all for $100 (a bit cheaper than just buying the 34 you had in mind). The stated object of the new 52 titles is to appeal to new (younger) readers, if that is truly the case and not just a revenue peak in an otherwise flaccid fiscal quarter, then my suggestion is they should have done what Marvel did with it's Ultimate line of books; create an EXTREEME, amped up, simplistically written enough to be translated into movies, multi-culty, dude-friendly super-quick read alternative line of books instead of throwing the baby out with the bath water. Better yet, with the dwindling attention span of most  younger people, who if they don't already read comics will never do so, no matter what the publishers do, why not put it on Twitter? At 160 characters an issue, I think the basic emotional, physical and narrative content of Justice League #1 could easily be displayed, for a monthly subscription rate that's less than a Happy Meal.