Jezer's forum posts

#1 Posted by Jezer (3212 posts) - - Show Bio

When you have an assignment worth 100% of your grade due the Tuesday after Spring Break, your day goes by pretty damn fast. Lol

Also, days go by faster as you age, since your perception of the time also correlates to how long you have lived. Your age is a measuring bar--when you're 5, 5 years is like a lifetime away to you, because it is literally. When you're 20, 5 years is 1/4th your life time and therefore feels comparatively shorter to you. Pretty sure this was verified by psych studies.

#2 Posted by Jezer (3212 posts) - - Show Bio

@pooty said:
@jezer said:

@pooty said:

@jezer: You can feel proud of your sister when she does something noteworthy. You can feel proud of a soldier when they do something noteworthy. You can feel proud of an ancestor because of something they did. You feel proud of THEM. Not proud of YOURSELF.

Let me get this straight. When you hear someone say "I'm proud to be Irish" or "I'm proud to be Black", you do not interpret that as being proud of the Irish or the Blacks(and for that reason proud to be associated with them), of "THEM" as a community or group of people who have accomplished and overcome things as a whole... you interpret that as them being proud of themselves? Errr that error lies with you.

Moreover,

proudproud/adjective

  1. 1.feeling deep pleasure or satisfaction as a result of one's own achievements, qualities, or possessions or those of someone with whom one is closely associated."a proud grandma of three boys"
    synonyms:pleased, glad, happy, delighted, joyful, overjoyed, thrilled, satisfied,gratified, content"the proud parents beamed"
  2. 2.having or showing a high or excessively high opinion of oneself or one's importanc

Two definitions.... If you notice, the second one essentially signifies high self-esteem. So, a phrase like "proud to be black" signfiies confidence in oneself as part of that ethnic group...You do not need achievements to be confident in oneself. If you have an issue with people saying this, it is because you haven't bothered to look up the different ways the word "proud" is used.

I'm aware of both definitions. and you are changing the second definition to fit your point of view. . No where does it say "confidence". It says "High opinion of oneself or importance". That's not confidence. That is arrogance. You shouldn't feel that way unless you have done something to feel that way. In fact, you should never have a high importance of oneself or think you're highly important. You're not

Reread

"Having or showing a high or excessively high opinion of oneself or one's importance"

Are you aware of the nuanced differences between confidence and arrogance, which could easily be equated to the difference between "high" and "excessively high"?

Your improper quoting and incorrect reading aside, I know you aren't seriously attempting a weak semantic argument that "confidence" "high self-esteem" aren't synonymous with each other, as well as meaning "high opinion of oneself or one's importance". I'm not going to bother posting more definitions of things that everyone knows.

Your error is that you seem to have failed to acknowledge that your individualistic point of view, where one can only be proud of only one's own accomplishment, is cultural. There are cultures, such as certain asian ones, where people think of themselves as part of a unit or a community. Therefore, everything they do reflects onto their community and things that people in their community does reflect on to them(I have dishonored my family! lol). However, American culture, and particularly white American culture, stresses the idea of self-autonomy and individual success. Oppressed groups, such as Irish and Blacks, have unifying experiences that bring them away from the individualistic perspective/identity and are likewise seen that way. That is why when a black person does something, such as failing academically, they are seen as representing the race instead of themself. Why wouldn't accomplishments of blacks also reflect on the race as a whole? How do you find it confusing that pride in ones race is hard to understand, when the opposite of pride, inferiority, has been proven(psychology studies) to be present in the black (See: The Kenneth and Mamie Clark experiments) community based on their race, despite your logic that such feelings of self-worth should only be byproducts of individuals own accomplishments? That's not how the world works.

#3 Posted by Jezer (3212 posts) - - Show Bio

@pooty said:

@jezer: You can feel proud of your sister when she does something noteworthy. You can feel proud of a soldier when they do something noteworthy. You can feel proud of an ancestor because of something they did. You feel proud of THEM. Not proud of YOURSELF.

Let me get this straight. When you hear someone say "I'm proud to be Irish" or "I'm proud to be Black", you do not interpret that as being proud of the Irish or the Blacks(and for that reason proud to be associated with them), of "THEM" as a community or group of people who have accomplished and overcome things as a whole... you interpret that as them being proud of themselves? Errr that error lies with you.

Moreover,

proudproud/adjective

  1. 1.feeling deep pleasure or satisfaction as a result of one's own achievements, qualities, or possessions or those of someone with whom one is closely associated."a proud grandma of three boys"
    synonyms:pleased, glad, happy, delighted, joyful, overjoyed, thrilled, satisfied,gratified, content"the proud parents beamed"
  2. 2.having or showing a high or excessively high opinion of oneself or one's importanc

Two definitions.... If you notice, the second one essentially signifies high self-esteem. So, a phrase like "proud to be black" signfiies confidence in oneself as part of that ethnic group...You do not need achievements to be confident in oneself. If you have an issue with people saying this, it is because you haven't bothered to look up the different ways the word "proud" is used.

#4 Posted by Jezer (3212 posts) - - Show Bio

@frozen said:

Many African-Americans believe that modern institutional racism is holding them back, but I feel I've had a shift in perspective away from that view-point.

Take the Indian American (not the Native Americans, if anyone gets mixed up....). Second to third generational Indians living in America. A recent report detailed how Indian Americans having the highest income, far above the average US household.

http://newamericamedia.org/2012/07/indian-americans-most-educated-richest-says-pew-report.php

Indians Americans also have the highest income levels, earning $65,000per year with a median household income of $88,000, far higher than the U.S. household average of 49,000, according to the survey.

Also the same supposedly applies for Chinese Americans:

Among Asians 25 or older, 49 percent hold a college degree, compared with 28 percent of all people in that age range in the United States. Median annual household income among Asians is $66,000 versus$49,800 among the general population.

To the point where the steryotype of strict Asian parents (both Chinese and Indian) has arisen in the US.

Like African Americans, Indian people are dark in skin and have faced discrimination because of that, yet in spite of this, they have still found great deals of success. Is there really a racist system or does equality of opportunity truly exist?

So... do you believe all racism against minorities are the same? Do you think Indians and African Americans both being dark skinned equate to the same way racism affects them?

Do you believe all racism is conscious and overt, as opposed to subconscious?

Have you heard of the Implicit Association Test and its implications for inheriting feelings of inferiority?

Are you aware that racial segregation became hidden under economic segregation between classes, as well as the affect of slavery on Education and economic mobility AND the idea that most people do not escape the class they were born in?

#5 Edited by Jezer (3212 posts) - - Show Bio

@pooty said:

@frozen said:

@pooty said:

I dislike when I see people wearing shirts saying " Proud to be Irish" or I'm black and i'm proud". What the hell are you proud of? You had no choice in your nationality/race. The accomplishments of a race/nationality are not your accomplishments. No race/nationality is superior in any way. No need to be "proud" of anything

The historical accomplishments which were geared for equality/more rights were so that future generations could have more rights. It's natural to feel ''proud'' of your race. Race may be a social construct, but it's embedded in our society.

Feeling proud of your race is embedded into our society but it is not natural. Being proud of your race is a learned behavior just as racism is a learned behavior. Any time a person feels "proud" of something, it means they did something above the norm. or accomplished something that others could not. Reaching a goal is something to be proud of. YOU actually did something to accomplish that goal. Being born irish, black, white or asian is nothing to feel proud of. Our race/nationality is not determined by us. Someone should not feel "proud" of something they had no control over.

Lol I've only just started skimming this thread, and I'm already rolling my eyes at responses.

I will feel proud when I have children and they graduate high school; that's not particularly above the norm. Additionally, one can feel proud to signify confidence and high opinion of a person, a group, or entity. Because of shared experiences, African Americans whether they want to or not are thrust fundamentally as representatives of their race. Other ethnic groups also have shared experienced and have overcome shared obstacles--long cycles of civil war and battles for independence in Ireland. This is why one can be proud of a characteristic one can be born with, when its such an intrinsic part of one's identity, that it refracts and influences you your life journey, and you carry the accomplishments of your predecessors on your back.

Additionally, if you have to accomplish something to be proud of it, does that mean you cannot be proud of your sister when she graduates college or grad school because she's not you and you didn't accomplish anything, not to mention you had no control over her being your sister?....No.

#6 Edited by Jezer (3212 posts) - - Show Bio

@petey_is_spidey said:

@jezer said:

@gizmorino said:

Am looking forward to the comics.

The korraXasami stuff is nothing but to satisfy fanbase, it was never intended to be like that, but to many people saw it like that and creators saw the huge potential or fanbase it would bring and confirmed it.

I never saw anything romantic there at all.

That's a great theory...but instead of theorizing or rationalizing it in your own way....you could just read the words of the creator(which directly contradicts you)

You can state that she blushes when Asami compliments her, but how is that out of the blue? I'm very hetero, but I will admit even if a gay man gives me a compliment it will boost my ego a little.

Please if anyone can, give me ONE hardcore instance that clearly shows that either one are gay?

I like how you say that if a gay man compliments you, it would boost your ego, but don't actually say that you would blush... as if those are interchangeable. I'm sure there's a logical fallacy for that.

I like how you ignore the fact that the tv producers could easily have Korra accept the compliment without a change in skin color and going through the extra effort of a "blush" animation, but they didn't. Interestingly enough, when Meelo and Jinorah first find Korra with Toph, they compliment her hair...and she doesn't blush. So, I guess we know the creators are aware of the ability for people's to take compliments in Avatar without blushing...Who would have thought,,,,?

Its like in a movie where the director takes a second to focus on something, and assumes the audience will be intelligent enough to know that means it may be signfiicant. Cinemotography. If you cannot put together those subtle hints and demand the creators to be as overt and "hardcore" that Korra making out with Asami is necessary to show she's bi, then that's simply your fault for having misconceptions about subtle storytelling and film theory techniques lol. Don't blame the creators.

#7 Posted by Jezer (3212 posts) - - Show Bio

@jezer said:

@nick_hero22 said:

@jezer said:

@nick_hero22 said:

@jezer said:

@nick_hero22 said:

I understand your point of contention, but the way rgat you worded it seemed like a sweeping attack on art practices outside of "physical" things like drawing and sketching, but this is where my disagreement with you is coming from. I believe that a historical survey of artistic ideas and people who practice the craft helps promote culture in our society, communicate the trends and popular movements in art, and explain the foundations of art. All of these aspects are important for a good artist and a productive human being.

Here is some information from UT Austin about potential job prospects for majors in Art History.

http://www.utexas.edu/finearts/sites/default/files/attach_download/art_history_career_guide.pdf

I know that psychology is a social science, I wasn't insinuating that you were a science major bashing non-science majors. Art is important aspect of human life, it is a mechanism through which we express ourselves and our value, and by reflecting on those things we can promote positive change in society. Again, I think that the extent to which humanities majors influence society is very understated!

That's a very impressively small list of jobs(almost two handfuls)....that essentially have no impact on society. Lol. I said "abundant", there are job prospects in anything. Also, you're definitely overhyping art.

There are other avenues through which culture is refracted(such as language and literature). I remain unimpressed by art..... ('-' )

Moreover, let's not forget that artists sometimes have their own flavor of snobbery/elitism equal to other professions...In a way, you're demonstrating it(I am art, I am the soul of society!). Theirs is just the least respectable *wink* I would laugh at someone in real life if they tried to act impressive in some way because they had an "eye" for art.

What would be a job that has a meaningful impact on society? And, there are other websites that have a list of job prospects for Art History majors. Just because there are other avenues through which culture is expressed doesn't negate the fact that art and its history has made important contributions to culture. I find it very puzzling that you would be unimpressed by art when your a user on a comic book site, comic books must have some level of influence in your life?

No, I don't see how that follows? I never said that art is the soul of society or that it is the primary contributor of culture. What I have advocated so far is that art's contribution to society has been understated because of stigmas in the academic and intellectual paradigm in this country. I have never heard or seen the level of snobbery in the humanities as I have seen and heard about in the sciences, in fact in the humanities I believe that there is a healthy dose of respect to scientific disciplines. I regularly heard about in the academic circles on the blog-sphere about professional scientist denigrating philosophy and humanities in general. This is extreme to me, especially when science was "Natural Philosophy" just a couple of hundred years ago.

Telling me that more may exist somewhere else does not indicate that they are abundant. Especially considering that a prudent University, like UT, would try to gather a list that consists a high percentage of the available opportunities for their students. There are other websites, but how many of them mostly just overlap with the ones with UT?

You didn't actually address my main points here.1 You haven't defined what types of jobs have meaningful impacts on society which would allow us to understand the rift between where you are coming from and where I'm coming from about the value of art history. 2. I never claimed that there was an abundant of job prospects, but you were trying to downplay the number of different opportunities that can be taking advantage of with a degree in Art History.

1. How can that be a "main point" when I literally just brought it up myself as a digression that wasn't intrinsic to the rest of my paragraph(check the bolded portion of my quoted post)... and you've only asked one question about it? If I say something, and you respond to it, and then I continue talking about other things I'd already brought up -- how is that me not addressing your "main point"(can a main point even be in reaction to a point someone else makes, conceptually?)? If I have to address every response made to some train of thought I start, when am I ever allowed to stop talking? lol Surely you don't expect me to respond to every response you have to a throwaway comment that's tertiary to my argument. That's how long digressions are created.

2. Its always tricky to say things like "I never claimed this" when the implication is understood from context or when your responses were answers to a question I had. I could simply say "I never claimed you claimed they were abundant" and that leads to an infinite cycle. Here is the progression of statements:

"And you say there are job prospects in art history....um how abundant are they? haha" Question. (Me)

"Here is some information from UT Austin about potential job prospects for majors in Art History. (You)

http://www.utexas.edu/finearts/sites/default/files/attach_download/art_history_career_guide.pdf "

"That's a very impressively small list of jobs(almost two handfuls)....that essentially have no impact on society. Lol. I said "abundant", there are job prospects in anything." (Me)

"And, there are other websites that have a list of job prospects for Art History majors." (You)

"Telling me that more may exist somewhere else does not indicate that they are abundant. Especially considering that a prudent University, like UT, would try to gather a list that consists a high percentage of the available opportunities for their students. There are other websites, but how many of them mostly just overlap with the ones with UT?" (Me)

"I never claimed that there was an abundant of job prospects, but you were trying to downplay the number of different opportunities that can be taking advantage of with a degree in Art History." (You)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Do you see how....off that is? How could you have been answering my original question, "how abundant are they", and then later say you're not talking about them being abundant? That literally means you simply never actually responded my original question over the course of your posts, while you attempted to pursue other subjects to discuss....This is how conversations rage out of control.

If your ultimate point was simply that art history jobs do indeed exist, then how is that a response to me saying "That's more along the lines of Art history....which probably has lower job prospects than underwater basket weaving." an exaggerated statement which, nonetheless, necessarily implies that some number of job prospects exist, even though they are low? You really spent a number of posts telling me something already acknowledged in my original post you were responding to... how is that an efficient use of time?

Let me tl;dr this for you: If my posts downplayed the amount(of art history job prospects) and asked if they were abundant, and you responded to them simply to tell me they exist--showing me a link with a very small amount(which ultimately served to prove the point I made, which you were responding to, thereby establishing that I wasn't "downplaying" but right)--did you ever really answer my question?.....If a tree falls in a forest, no one's around to hear it, and everyone's too busy talking about Jersey Shore, then did that philosophy question ever exist? Lol

1) I believe it to be a major point of contention when you say that these jobs have no meaningful impact on society you need to define what you mean by that statement because what you take to be meaningful might be different from what someone else would consider being meaningful, so you need explain before we can evaluate whether or not jobs in art history are irrelevant to what goes on in society. You never addressed the point because you never explained what that meant in particular. Its not a digression when you stated in your response that those types of jobs have no meaningful impact on society.

2) This is a misrepresentation on your part because your original statement compared the job prospects of being an art history major to being a homeless person, and I corrected you showing that the job prospects in art history isn't as bleak as you are trying to portray it, so you know full well that I never claimed or implied that jobs were abundant in the discipline; but they abundant enough to not warrant a comparison to homeless people.

So, I'm going to leave this discussion because it not going in a very positive and honest direction.

1. Haha no, because as I spent my last two posts telling you, that's not actually pertinent what I have been saying, regardless of whether you want to make it so. Additionally, it came very late in my string of posts, so the idea that it was part of my main point means that I was not talking about my main point for the duration of the conversation....I'm a lot more efficient with my words than that. That is why it is still a digression. "Its not a digression when you stated in your response that those types of jobs have no meaningful impact on society." How does me stating that make it not a digression? lol

di·gres·sionˌdīˈɡreSH(ə)n/noun

  1. a temporary departure from the main subject in speech or writing

If what I said departs from what I was arguing previously....then its a digression. It is almost like you are grasping at ways to respond to what I'm saying, regardless of whether its illogical or ineffective as an actual response.

2. Aside from that being an exaggeration, what you've failed to understand is that people associate a tiny amount of job prospects with lower future income potential. So, whether or not jobs actually exist, people are going to see it as a bad investment that will lead to financial ruin if there are not many....That's not a misrepresentation. You either understand, or you don't, that if you take out thousands of dollars of student loans to go in an area where there are fewer jobs AND they may not be high paying, people are going to feel like your goal in life is to become homeless.

A handful of possible jobs is not nearly abundant enough to not be compared to homeless people. Don't be purposely obtuse.

#8 Posted by Jezer (3212 posts) - - Show Bio

@bumpyboo said:

I think they are two very different things, and I couldn't say whether one is worse than the other. The way I see it, one has the potential to ruin or at the very least taint the rest of your life in an external manner, in relation to how others perceive you and how the world reacts to you. The other has the potential to do so on an internal level, in terms of how you interact with others and how you feel about yourself.

Someone falsely accused may lose a significant amount of life opportunities because of the bias people have against them. Even if you were cleared, some people will always prefer to believe the bad they hear about people. I'd imagine it is a very isolating experience, and to know that there are those who believe you could do such a thing, who now see you as someone evil and disgusting who is not to be trusted...I feel very bad for anybody going through that. You can lose your spouse, have your kids taken away, have people attack you or your home or loved ones, lose your job, all kinds of bad mess. It really can be the end of your world. To say nothing of what happens to sex offenders in prison....

But someone who is raped might lose those same things - friends, family, job prospects etc - because of what is going on inside their heads. Some people respond better to therapy than others, some seem to recover relatively well and go on to lead well balanced lives, while others may suffer flashbacks, depression, night terrors, addiction, sexual issues, problems with self esteem and all kinds of emotional problems for the rest of their lives. It can lead to the breakdown of marriages and friendships, ruin your career, and depending on who the offender is it can break apart families. Plus, just like the falsely accused, there really are people out there who will never see you the same again. We had a thread here along the lines of "would you date someone who had been raped?" which highlighted that aspect.

So yeah, I guess they are both terrible things that I wouldn't wish on anyone. Choosing between them to me is moot, like asking would you rather be stabbed or shot, or whether you'd prefer to have stage 4 cancer or AIDS. Sure, you might have a preference, but it's semantics really. Not like you'd want the other option as a surprise birthday present or anything.

It's been a while(like a year or so) since I've been impressed with a post on Comicvine. Thanks for articulating this into words.

#9 Edited by Jezer (3212 posts) - - Show Bio

@gizmorino said:

Am looking forward to the comics.

The korraXasami stuff is nothing but to satisfy fanbase, it was never intended to be like that, but to many people saw it like that and creators saw the huge potential or fanbase it would bring and confirmed it.

I never saw anything romantic there at all.

That's a great theory...but instead of theorizing or rationalizing it in your own way....you could just read the words of the creator(which directly contradicts you)

#10 Posted by Jezer (3212 posts) - - Show Bio

Did it really need to be confirmed? It was pretty obvious.

I understand that sometimes people get polarized by extreme opinions or hype. So, if you heard she came out as a "lesbian" at the final scene, and then saw it, you may be so underwhelmed by how subtly it was done that you simply shake your head at the foolish masses. "I was expecting more based on all the talk on the internet...that's nothing."

Not believing it from that basis is understandable. Otherwise, if you missed it, you were either strongly in denial(but actually knew) or you're slow...intellectually.