There's a Right and Wrong Way to Do Things

I don't mind Hollywood  changing a character to simplify it for screen translation, but it becomes a problem when they shoe-horn a character into a movie and present in a way that completely negates his/her relevance to the comic book world.  I can't stand when Hollywood takes a comic book property and throws away the central concepts that make the product enjoyable in favor of hyping up a particular actor or character in the movie other than the hero.  It took a while for studios to start getting that right.  For a while it seemed as if they had no regard for what the audience would want in a comic book movie and no idea of how to balance making the material accessible to the mainstream while showing respect to the source material. 

You can look at a movie like Batman and Robin how it was more about getting George Clooney, Uma Thurman, Gov Schwarzenegger, Alicia Silverstone and Coolio into a movie than making sure that we got a good Batman story.  Since they never introduced us to Commissioner Gordon, Batgirl had to be Alfred's miraculously skilled niece, and Bane, one of Batman's most vicious foes, became a 'roided-out goomba in a gimp mask. 

Once the first X-men came along , that was a great start.  It did a have a strong cast of well known actors, but none of them got top billing over the fact that it was about presenting Stan's Lee's team of mutants, whom many of us had seen in cartoon form, on the big screen.  They changed a few dynamics of the characters, but not in a way that made them seem weak or feel pointless.  They understood that it was much more productive to focus on a few characters rather than introduce many and give them virtually no depth for sake of saying they were in the movie (I'll just leave X-3 or Wolverine out of this for right now).  Spiderman was also excellent for the same reason.  I heard a few complaints about the organic web shooters but I didn't mind that and they eventually worked it into the comic (before they went back on it).  This was easy to buy into because it was a way to work in an intergral part of Spidey's abilities without complicating the story with the creation of web fluid and shooters.  What they did in the third Spiderman movie was annoying, but hopefullt they learn their lesson.  Marvel having their own movies is great news for everyone. 

The studios just need to remember that moviegoers, comic nerds or not, are there to see the charcacters and story presented in the best way possible.     

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There's a Right and Wrong Way to Do Things

I don't mind Hollywood  changing a character to simplify it for screen translation, but it becomes a problem when they shoe-horn a character into a movie and present in a way that completely negates his/her relevance to the comic book world.  I can't stand when Hollywood takes a comic book property and throws away the central concepts that make the product enjoyable in favor of hyping up a particular actor or character in the movie other than the hero.  It took a while for studios to start getting that right.  For a while it seemed as if they had no regard for what the audience would want in a comic book movie and no idea of how to balance making the material accessible to the mainstream while showing respect to the source material. 

You can look at a movie like Batman and Robin how it was more about getting George Clooney, Uma Thurman, Gov Schwarzenegger, Alicia Silverstone and Coolio into a movie than making sure that we got a good Batman story.  Since they never introduced us to Commissioner Gordon, Batgirl had to be Alfred's miraculously skilled niece, and Bane, one of Batman's most vicious foes, became a 'roided-out goomba in a gimp mask. 

Once the first X-men came along , that was a great start.  It did a have a strong cast of well known actors, but none of them got top billing over the fact that it was about presenting Stan's Lee's team of mutants, whom many of us had seen in cartoon form, on the big screen.  They changed a few dynamics of the characters, but not in a way that made them seem weak or feel pointless.  They understood that it was much more productive to focus on a few characters rather than introduce many and give them virtually no depth for sake of saying they were in the movie (I'll just leave X-3 or Wolverine out of this for right now).  Spiderman was also excellent for the same reason.  I heard a few complaints about the organic web shooters but I didn't mind that and they eventually worked it into the comic (before they went back on it).  This was easy to buy into because it was a way to work in an intergral part of Spidey's abilities without complicating the story with the creation of web fluid and shooters.  What they did in the third Spiderman movie was annoying, but hopefullt they learn their lesson.  Marvel having their own movies is great news for everyone. 

The studios just need to remember that moviegoers, comic nerds or not, are there to see the charcacters and story presented in the best way possible.     

Start the Conversation