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4.04 stars 4.04/5 Stars Average score of 12 user reviews

Nightwing #19, aka Higgins & Booth deliver the goods 0

If anyone hasn't been reading this, or felt that the first 19 issues (don't forget #0) were too dark for this character, you might want to give this Nightwing another shot. Being the start of a new arc, Higgins lays a lot of seeds about what we'll be seeing later while not sacrificing the story in this single issue. While far from a done-in-one, this single issue packs in a lot of information that makes for a solid read (and re-read, and re-re-read). We're given Dick's motivations for relocatin...

1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Nightwing #19, aka Higgins & Booth deliver the goods 0

If anyone hasn't been reading this, or felt that the first 19 issues (don't forget #0) were too dark for this character, you might want to give this Nightwing another shot. Being the start of a new arc, Higgins lays a lot of seeds about what we'll be seeing later while not sacrificing the story in this single issue. While far from a done-in-one, this single issue packs in a lot of information that makes for a solid read (and re-read, and re-re-read). We're given Dick's motivations for relocatin...

1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Goodbye Little Brother 0

I must say, of all the Requiem issues, this is the one I was most looking forward to. While Batman & Robin #18 was such a great, emotional issue, how Damian’s death affects Dick Grayson was something that had potential to be memorable. And boy, does Kyle Higgins nail it here. Dick is, once again, an emotional wreck. And understandably so. While still working out the aftermath of Death of the Family, he has now lost his little brother. Damian’s pep-talk with Dick from Issue #17 is revisited h...

1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Deafening Silence 0

In the spirit of this issue, I’m going to limit what I say. When it was first announced that this issue was going to be “silent,” expectations were raised. Everyone was expecting an emotionally powerful issue, and that’s exactly what we received. The art team of Patrick Gleason (pencils) and Mick Gray (inks) do a masterful job of bringing Peter Tomasi’s narrative to life. Every panel is oozing with emotion. Our very first image is of Bruce’s eyes as he sits by a fireplace in Wayne Manor. The wri...

2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Titans Together! Titans Forever! 0

In the 1980s, team-up books were a license to print money. Marvel’s ace-in-the-hole was Chris Claremont’s X-Men. DC countered, not with big guns like the Justice League, but with a team comprised of sidekicks and new characters - The New Teen Titans, under the pen of Marv Wolfman and drawn by George Perez. This was DC’s top title and gave us new characters that have become DCU mainstays like Raven, Cyborg, and Starfire. It made Robin (eventually, Nightwing) cool. It gave us Deathstroke. And it i...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

It's Harper Row! Also, "Requiem" 0

It’s issues like this that remind me how spoiled we've been with Greg Capullo on art duties. Like issue #12, we are given a Harper Row-centric story with someone other than Capullo providing pencil work. Maybe it’s because Capullo’s style has been, for me, a perfect match for this Batman title, the work of the fill-in artists seem just a bit off. And it shouldn't, especially since we have Andy Kubert, who’s done wonderful work on Batman in the past. However, his style is better suited for the Ja...

1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

So You CAN Relaunch Without Renumbering 0

Jeff Lemire might be the most talented writer in DC's stable. Finally given the reigns to a marquee member of the DCU stable (dude's got his own TV show, which is more than what Wonder Woman can claim), he has turned a book from one that I thought should be cancelled to a must-read. I don't want to say much about the story because everyone should read this, but Lemire is laying the groundwork for what should be a great arc in a very enjoyable manner. We see Ollie deal with the fallout of the pre...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Robin R.I.P. 0

For those of you that have managed to avoid spoilers, this issue is heartbreaking. For those of you that are aware of what happens, this issue is heartbreaking. Grant Morrison pens what might be one of the best issues of his entire Batman run here. We are given an action-packed issue that is littered with great character moments. There are callbacks to not only events from earlier in Grant's run, but the Bat-history in general. Tim Drake is given the opportunity to really shine here, which is so...

8 out of 9 found this review helpful.

Down the Wishing Well... 0

I have to say this right off the bat - I did not like this issue. Not because it’s well written, but because simply not a lot happens here. We pick up where last issue left off - with Nightwing staring down the barrel of several guns. Would he escape? Well since the character is still taking out baddies on a regular basis 18 years later, you should know the answer to that.My main problem with this issue is that it is very heavy on the exposition. And while it serves to shed light on the history ...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

The Debut of Fingerstripes! 0

In the last issue, Dick Grayson gave up the mantle of Nightwing and learned that his parent’s death has something to do with the nation of Kravia. I’ll get to the actual story and artwork in a moment, but first we must acknowledge something truly special. This issue is the debut of the black & blue costume, complete with the beloved finger stripes. It’s a look that would stick with the character until he inherited the cowl from Bruce Wayne in 2009, and is by far his most popular look. Drink ...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Nightwing's Last Hurrah? Probably not. 0

Dick Grayson had always enjoyed a strong career in comics spanning back to his first appearance in Detective Comics #38. However, he never enjoyed much solo success until the Nightwing: Alfred’s Return one-shot. Prior to that, Nightwing had a couple solo outings in Action Comics Weekly, New Teen Titans Spotlight, and Showcase ‘94. However, 1995 saw comic fans’ first extended Nightwing story written by Dennis O’Neil with art by Greg Land. This issue, titled “The Resignation,” begins shortly after...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Can Dick Grayson convince Alfred to return to Gotham? 0

In 1995, DC released the one-shot Nightwing: Alfred’s Return as a means to assess the character’s popularity on his own merits. Since taking on the Nightwing mantle, Dick Grayson had made appearances throughout various DC publications such as Teen Titans, Action Comics and, of course, showing up in Batbooks such as Batman and Detective Comics. However, this was the character's first true headlining opportunity.Nightwing: Alfred's Return has not aged well - I'm not even sure if it was good in the...

1 out of 1 found this review helpful.