Seven Comic Writers That Inspire Me

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I have aspired to be a writer for years, and feel I do a fair job at it, although I have drawn royalties exactly once. My desire has always been to break into comics, but I have a sneaking suspicion I will have to write elsewhere, before I can do that. Still, I have spent years developing a list of characters, adding notes here and there, and finding the writing and creativity that most appeals to me in comics. Here's the list of the top seven, and what I like about them:

1) Erik Larsen - Larsen is the first comic writer of my adulthood to excite me. Savage Dragon is one of the best rides in the comics amusement park. You never know which way it's going to go. Early on, Dragon comes face-to-face with his top foe, Overlord, and is utterly beaten. He fights him again, and a different foe breaks in on the fight, snatches Dragon and flies away, later sending him to hell. Two girlfriends and a wife have died, his daughter has been lost in another dimension, and his son stolen just after birth. As cops deal with one crisis in the department, a second crisis erupts as a group of supervillains bust in and start killing everyone.

I find this to be top notch writing. People age, change and die. Relationships come and go. The hero is not immune to tragedy. Sometimes, a few crises happen at the same time, rather than waiting their turn. Crossovers happen, and the events are held onto as part of the continuity. Currently, Dragon's not even the good guy. He's regained his memories from when he was the despotic tyrant of an alien race, and he is wreaking havoc. Larsen has said from the beginning that no one is safe in his book, including Dragon. He's always held that one day, Dragon will die and someone else will have to take over the starring role. I have my guesses, like anyone, of where things will go, but have never been disappointed to be wrong - and that's a frequent occurrence with this book.

One other thing that Larsen does: when he uses someone else's character, he tries to stay true to the character, and not write them badly to make his own character shine. He has crossed over with Superman, Madman, Hellboy, Wanted, the Amazing Joy Buzzards, Shadowhawk, 10th Muse, Spawn, Backlash, Invincible, and my personal favorite, Destroyer Duck. There are surely others that I have forgotten, and not once have I ever felt the guest character was out-of-character. Maybe I'm gushing, but I find this to be a true mark of professionalism, because he treats others' properties with as much or more respect than his own.

2) Robert Kirkman - I think it's in one of the first Invincible trades that Kirkman remarks that he stole all of his writing techniques from Erik Larsen. To me, it shows. I've commented on the sudden changes that take place in Larsen's writing, and somehow, Kirkman's made the style his own. One thing about this style is that it tells a complex story, but in a somehow simple way. Things don't often seem convoluted or contrived - just "Of course, that had to happen." It may not be something I saw coming, but when it happens, I say, "Yeah, it was all there," and I marvel at how he's kept the story together all this time.

What amazes me about Kirkman is that he doesn't do it in just Invincible. Larsen's been content to just do Savage Dragon, with the occasional mini-series or one-shot. Kirkman, on the other hand, writes Invincible, Astounding Wolf-Man, Brit, Walking Dead, Youngblood, and probably more I don't know about. When I was first discovering his work, he was also writing Marvel Team-Up. I don't automatically like a story, because it has a favorite writer on it, but I have yet to read a bad one by Kirkman.

3) Jay Faerber - I know Faerber's writing through Noble Causes and Dynamo 5. I'm hoping D5 survives the poor economy, because I like this book almost as much as I liked New Teen Titans, in the Eighties. Again, I find his writing similar to Larsen's and Kirkman's, but there's something faster about the pacing. I can breeze through a D5 trade in nothing flat, and almost be vexed that I spent the money on the thing, because it went so quickly. Only "almost" though, because I always enjoy the story. He does some nice things with characterization - characters actually stay true to their personalities, even when it might be more convenient for them not to. It kind of lent a soap opera quality to Noble Causes, and a family quality to the dysfunctional Dynamo 5. Also, you can't help but be intrigued in the "lecherous Superman" of Captain Dynamo, or what I wish Lois Lane was, in Maddie Warner. Nice stuff.

4) Mark Waid - Mark Waid was probably one of the first writers whose name I started looking for in the credits. I loved his run on Flash, where he defined Max Mercury as "the zen master of speed." Kingdom Come and Kingdom drove my imagination for months (and I highly recommend the Absolute edition, that includes all the companion material for KC, including a listing of every single character appearing in the book). Empire should be required reading for any aspiring writer, as they try to figure out why Golgoth's forces build a bridge in plain sight of the enemy. His current works, Irredeemable and Incorruptible, I don't know as well. I've read the first few issues of Irredeemable, and loved them, but haven't been able to keep up with them since (my wallet has not been inexhaustible). In a two part video interview with Babs of Comic Vine, Waid states that he'd like to teach writing to up-and-coming writers. Personally, I hope that happens at some point. I would sign up in a heartbeat, if at all possible.

5) Kurt Busiek - I don't have a ton to say about Kurt Busiek, because I think Astro City pretty well speaks for him. Also, I hold his writing in high regard because one of my all time favorite stories was written by Busiek - a JLA/JSA crossover, that puts the two teams on Apokolips (Justice League of America #183-185). Simply awesome. Another favorite is a story called "The Scoop" (Astro City #2, Sept. 1995). Busiek's mother gave him a real newspaper article, about shark remains found on a subway track, and he turned it into a reporter's epic superhero story. The problem is the reporter couldn't prove it, so he wrote a very short article about shark remains found on a subway track - the only evidence that anything had occurred there. Extrapolating such an extreme story from such a simple but odd article is pure creativity. The kind that takes me back to when I was a kid, coming up with outrageous ideas on the tiniest scraps of information. That almost gives me goosebumps just thinking about it.

6) Brian Michael Bendis - This guy's been picking up some hatred lately, but I think that's just because his name is on so much stuff, people are sick of seeing it. I don't have that problem. I wish I was as prolific in writing as this man. When asked how he can write so much, his answer is simple: he does the work. Or as he puts it in his letter columns for Powers, he has "no life." Comics aren't just a job for him, he enjoys them, so he spends his time writing. He's not wasting work time on playing video games or whatever other stuff tends to distract guys that mostly make their own schedule.

The thing that inspires me the most about Bendis is that he isn't just throwing stuff at the wall and hoping something sticks. He's actually researching. Articles I read about Secret Invasion said that when he pitched the series, he went through the entire Marvel history of the Skrulls, and laid out how everything connected and culminated in this invasion. I think that's basically what we got in Secret Invasion Saga.

7) Rob Liefeld - This probably comes as a shock to most, because Liefeld is probably the most popular whipping boy in comics, but he truly is one of my favorite writers in comics. NOT because I necessarily think he's a great writer, but because of the sheer amount of books and characters he has put out. I ran across an interview with Crazy Cat Com Comics, posted on Comic Vine, where Liefeld said, "About twenty years ago, it's like my head exploded," and all of these characters came out. Entire teams - Youngblood (in two or three versions of the team), Bloodstrike, New Men, and Brigade - as well as solid solo characters Supreme and Glory. Nevermind stuff he did at Maximum, like Avengelyne. And lest we forget, he created Cable and Deadpool for Marvel - characters that, love 'em or hate 'em - have carried at least five titles each.

I don't care about "tiny feet" and whatever else might be said about his art. As I have trouble drawing better than a twelve year old, I think his art is teriffic. The thing with Liefeld is that he seems to have trouble getting books out on time, if at all. Still, when Marvel tried to sue him over Agent America, he managed to get the rights to Fighting American, effectively thumbing his nose at Marvel, and with a nice bit of historical symmetry. If you don't admire him for that, you have no soul.

***

Overall, what probably draws me to all of these guys is that they've created a large amount of characters for their books, and I always love seeing new characters. Their enthusiasm for comics is infectious, and their creativity seems to know no bounds. To me, these are the guys that have learned their lessons from Kirby, Lee and other predecessors. Like them, these seven throw even the craziest ideas on the page, and make them work. Also, more often than not, these are the guys who cause me to have to strike a name from my list of characters, and that just challenges me to come up with something else. While it always gives me chagrin to one degree or another, I enjoy it too. It makes me feel like, "Yes, this idea was good enough for someone else to use in comics, so I must be on the right track." Then I try to come up with the next thing. There are other writers I like, sure - Chuck Dixon, Bill Willingham, Geoff Johns, et.al. - but these seven always give me something to smile about, even if it's a sly smirk of "Man, they beat me to it again." You have to find your inpsirations as a writer though, and these are a few of mine. I hope you enjoyed it.

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27 Comments
27 Comments
Posted by Video_Martian

U no like Geoff Johns???

Posted by cbishop
@mr.obvious: I mentioned Johns in the end.  I also mentioned though that I like these seven in particular for the sheer number of characters they have created.  I don't know of many original characters created by Johns.  But yes, I think he is a teriffic writer.  He's another one that gets a lot of hate from people lately, but I think I've liked just about everything I've seen from him.  I have yet to read Blackest Night though.
Posted by SumoSlamMan

All these guys have a lot of great super hero stuff floating around, I dig on Kirkman and Mark Waid a ton, and there's nothing wrong with the capes crowd, but do you dig on any non-super hero comic book writers?  Just curious. 

Edited by cbishop
Edited by Abnormally Warm Guy

Liefield is good at creating characters because he rips other's creation off. Ha ha ha. But you have to respect the man. He put himself out there helped build an entire comic company from the ground up... and then robbed it blind but who's cares about that right?

Posted by Winfield

Did I read No7 right???? 
 
I think my head just exploded

Edited by cbishop
@Abnormally Warm Guy: I try to live by "Don't take up an offense for another."  Whatever Liefeld may have done during his first run at Image, that seems to have been worked out, as he's back there now, so no, I don't think his previous offenses matter.  As for ripping off other's creations, it could be argued that many creator-owned properties are derivative of stuff at the Big Two.  Offhand though, other than derivatives of Cable and Deadpool, which Liefeld created for Marvel, I cannot think of characters that Liefeld has ripped off.  Troll's hair made him look like Wolverine in the face.  Liefeld wanted to use reworks of his Captain America art on his own Agent America, but I don't consider that any more derivative than Mighty Man to Captain Marvel, Invincible to Superboy, or the way Valentino creates villains that are direct derivatives of DC heroes (Blackjack/Superman; Nocturn/Batman).  Glory is a twisted derivative of Wonder Woman, but Supreme wasn't really a Superman derivative until Alan Moore came along.  Before that, the only way Supreme paralleled Superman was that he had a cape and was obviously the most powerful being in Liefeld's universe of characters. 
 
I mean, really, are Supreme and Glory more of a ripoff than Apollo (Superman) and Midnighter (Batman), Promethea (Wonder Woman), Tom Strong (early Superman), Pitt (Hulk) or Miracleman (direct derivative of Captain Marvel)?  And just how broad do you want to define "ripoff" or "derivative?"  It could be argued that Deathblow is derivative of the Punisher (as was New Universe's Merc).  In fact, the Big Two are copying each other all the time - Superman/Sentry, JLA/Squadron Supreme, Legion of Super-Heroes/ Imperial Guard, Green Arrow/ Hawkeye, Shang Chi/ Richard Dragon, etc. 
 
Liefeld hasn't really done anything that wasn't being done in the industry all along.  I really think to accuse him of ripping off other creations - any more than other creators have done - just goes back to using Liefeld as the favorite whipping boy. 
 
Don't get me wrong, Liefeld has his weaknesses.  Chief among them seems to be promoting the heck out of a new idea, and then taking forever to get the book out, if it comes out at all.  He's been in the business for twenty-plus years, and has convinced people like Alan Moore and Robert Kirkman to work with him, as well as convincing the holders of the Fighting American rights to let him use the character.  His follow through is weak though, and he apparently had to pay Alan Moore by signing over Glory to him.  Liefeld's mistakes have been more obvious (or perhaps more reported on) but he's managed to correct those things in one way or another.  I honestly don't consider myself a big Liefeld fan, but I can look at both sides of things where he's concerned, and I do find the sheer number of characters he's created inspiring.
Posted by cbishop
@Winfield said:
"Did I read No7 right????  I think my head just exploded "

LOL, did you read No7 in its entirety?  I think I pretty well explained it.  Beyond that, see the above response to Abnormally Warm Guy. ;)
Edited by FadeToBlackBolt

Grant Morrison's Doom Patrol changed my life. 
 
"The door flew open, in he ran, the great red long-legged Scissorman"
 
Brilliant. 
 
Interesting list, I don't necessarily agree with all of it, but it's certainly interesting.

Posted by cbishop
@FadeToBlackBolt: I actually haven't read any of that Doom Patrol yet.  I thought the characters that came out of it were pretty cool - particularly the complicated mess of Crazy Jane - but I haven't actually gotten to read the stories yet.  I'm glad the trade paperbacks are out there now, and I'll probably get to 'em someday.  Again, I like Morrison's stuff, but in doses.
Posted by Winfield
@cbishop: I read the post. I get what you're saying. To me he is a very enthusiastic and creative guy with a lot of ideas that dont payoff because he doesnt stick around on the same project long enough to properly develop his characters. As an artist he isnt great, but he isnt as awful as most will claim. I just have never thought of him as a writer before. Im not a hater, but Im also not a fan.
Posted by cbishop
@Winfield: Fair enough.  I don't know if he's written anything for other companies or not (haven't researched him thoroughly).   I think of him as a writer only so far as he has written some of his own books.  Do I think he's a great writer?  No.  I think it was a good idea to get other writers to write his books.  I guess the main thing is his number of characters.  I suppose that doesn't really count as writing, but there is writing involved behind the scenes with character creation, as you have to develop a character's backstory.  ...To a lesser degree, I threw Liefeld in to make people's heads explode. ;)
Posted by Abnormally Warm Guy
@cbishop:  I guess my major gripe with Liefield is that he is really REALLY ( I can't stress this enough) full of himself. You knwo he takes full credit for creating deadpool. He has a whole backstory of how he created it. And you knwo what that back story is? A BUNCH OF LIES.
 
His story:
"I was jealous of  Todd Mcfarlane, always getting to draw Spider-man. It easy, because he wears a mask. So I created a Deadpool a wise cracking mercenary who who wears a mask. That's why he captures cable with a net in the first appearance. It an homage!"
 
What actually happened:
 
Rob was a big Teen Titans fan. He really liked Deathstroke so he drew up Deadpool as a nameless serious character mercenary and brought to Fabian Nicezia (his editor and co writer)  who said "looks like Deathstroke (yep he saw right through it), let's make him a parody. That'd be fun. And he made himt he wise crackin' mercenary we all know and love.  But Liefield never acknowledges Fabian's contribution, the important contribution that made Deadpool what he is.
 
Don't get me wrong. Deadpool's design is cool and all but it's not why I like him.
Posted by Eyz
@Abnormally Warm Guy: It's not like Deadpool was already his modern-self from the start.
In his first appearance by Liefeld and Nicezia, he was sort of serious, wasn't breaking the 4th wall, wasn't making jokes every seconds. He was as funny as, say, The Punisher.
So he was a plain simple Marvel's Deathstroke at first. That's in the miniseries and the regular on-going after that, that, still under Nicezia but with new artists, Deadpool started making jokes, being the merc' with a mouth and all~
 
Nice enough list! I see you're a man enough, brabe and bold to admit it and put Liefeld on your list!
I seriously don't hate the guy too. It's kind of hypocrite how everyone's bashing the guy lately, while ~15 years ago they were probably mass buying every single book with his art or  othersimilar artists's style.
One thing you can't deny is the sheer amount of work he did!
Posted by Abnormally Warm Guy
@Eyz: Deadpool does crack a few jokes in the first appearance.
 
And I have few gripes with Liefiled as an artist. When he tries his art is fun to look at and interesting but he gets lazy and when that happens boks bcome late, anatomy turns to shit and costumes randonly change.
 
As a writer he's awful He should just stick to drawing.
Edited by cbishop

@Abnormally Warm Guy said:

" @cbishop:  I guess my major gripe with Liefield is that he is really REALLY ( I can't stress this enough) full of himself. You knwo he takes full credit for creating deadpool. He has a whole backstory of how he created it. And you knwo what that back story is? A BUNCH OF LIES.  His story: "I was jealous of  Todd Mcfarlane, always getting to draw Spider-man. It easy, because he wears a mask. So I created a Deadpool a wise cracking mercenary who who wears a mask. That's why he captures cable with a net in the first appearance. It an homage!"  What actually happened:  Rob was a big Teen Titans fan. He really liked Deathstroke so he drew up Deadpool as a nameless serious character mercenary and brought to Fabian Nicezia (his editor and co writer)  who said "looks like Deathstroke (yep he saw right through it), let's make him a parody. That'd be fun. And he made himt he wise crackin' mercenary we all know and love.  But Liefield never acknowledges Fabian's contribution, the important contribution that made Deadpool what he is.  Don't get me wrong. Deadpool's design is cool and all but it's not why I like him. "

 
I agree that he seems to be full of himself sometimes, but meh, that doesn't really bother me.  It takes all kinds, y'know?  I've heard that story you're mentioning, and I think that's word-for-word from an interview I've seen linked to CV from another site.  In that same interview though, he mentions something else - Deadpool's costume hasn't changed for over 20 years - that is impressive, with a character coming out of the Eighties. 
 
Also, in the sense of being diplomatically minded here, I think it's fair to say that Fabian's contribution doesn't necessarily negate Rob's story.  And it's likely that the inspiration for Deadpool was drawn from multiple sources - a little bit from Deathstroke, a little bit from Spidey.  While being derivative, there's really nothing wrong with that.  Would it be nice to hear him mention Fabian's part of the process in his story?  Yeah, but it's not really so unusual to hear people make the story all about themselves.  I just kind of shrug that off.

@Eyz said:

" ...Nice enough list! I see you're a man enough, brabe and bold to admit it and put Liefeld on your list! I seriously don't hate the guy too. It's kind of hypocrite how everyone's bashing the guy lately, while ~15 years ago they were probably mass buying every single book with his art or  othersimilar artists's style. One thing you can't deny is the sheer amount of work he did! "

 
I think fans are too quick to jump on the bandwagon, when it comes to bashing writers and artists.  It's like comic fans are generally so afraid of being nerds and outcasts, they'll agree with the first person who finds a voice in the fan world, so at least they're part of that "cool" clique.  It's kind of highschool.  Again, in fairness though: I recently went back and looked at some of Liefeld's earliest Image work, and there are some bad things in his art.  Things I didn't notice the first few times I looked at it, but there are obvious (well, obvious now) anatomy problems and impossible poses all throughout.  STILL, the guy draws better than me, so beyond observing that there are problems there, I have nothing bad to say about Liefeld. 

@Abnormally Warm Guy

said:

" @Eyz: Deadpool does crack a few jokes in the first appearance.  And I have few gripes with Liefiled as an artist. When he tries his art is fun to look at and interesting but he gets lazy and when that happens boks bcome late, anatomy turns to s~ and costumes randonly change.  As a writer he's awful He should just stick to drawing. "


I do agree that Liefeld doesn't write well.  I think he gets great ideas, but he needs to hand those ideas over to a writer capable of executing them, and just handle the art... and actually handle it.  I recall reading another Image creator years ago, who basically said Liefeld spends a lot of time goofing off, and then rushes everything when it gets down to the deadline, and that's why his art looks bad sometimes.  Going back to that same interview we were talking about a minute ago, Rob even says the reason he was jealous of Todd drawing Spidey - with his full face mask - is because the full face mask is easier to draw when you're getting down to deadlines. 
 
Even if that's all true though, he still put out a tremendous amount of work in the late 80's/ early 90's, and people snatched it up, whether they say so or not.  I think that's why people bash Rob - they bought a lot of books that were ultimately disappointing.  It's frustrating to buy something that you can tell could have been better, and also tell that the work was phoned in.  I haven't had much fun money lately, so I haven't had the chance to check out the new Youngblood, that Robert Kirkman was supposedly writing.  I'd be really curious to see how that comes out, because Kirkman can squeeze every last drop of writery goodness out of a character or group of characters.  I'd really like to see that with more of Rob's characters, like how Alan Moore brought new life to Supreme (granted: as Superman, but still, it was better than the original).

Posted by TheDrifter

Todd McFarlane inspires me.

Posted by Jotham

Interesting. Savage Dragon actually sounds pretty cool. I read the first issue, and didn't think I'd like it.

Posted by cbishop
@TheDrifter said:
"Todd McFarlane inspires me. "
 
What is it that inspires you about McFarlane?  Details, man, details! ;)
 
I can take his art or leave it (but I'm like that about most art), and I don't think he can write, but I like McFarlane's business sense.  The guy was a money-making machine when Image first started, and he's made smart moves along the way.  I think he was absolutely robbed on the "Medeival Spawn" lawsuit with Gaiman, but I think in the spirit of what Image claimed to be about when it started, he should have never contended for ownership of Miracleman.  In recent years, stuff I have read about him makes me think that he's getting a little nuts - almost like he's too wrapped up in his own hype.  I'd be happy to be wrong about that.

@Jotham said:
"Interesting. Savage Dragon actually sounds pretty cool. I read the first issue, and didn't think I'd like it. "

I cannot say enough good stuff about Savage Dragon, so let me not attempt to here.  I think Larsen deserves his props for the book.  I wish I could recommend picking it up in trades, but you cannot get the entire series in TPB yet.  I do recommend hunting down the back issues though (and if you find #136, let me know!). :)
Posted by Eyz
@Abnormally Warm Guy: I think the problem was that people took his art, in the 90s, like it was the most beautiful art ever done, super realistic and the perfect template for superhero books...but his style, as good or bad as it is, is just simply "stylized", and shouldn't have been copy/pasted by so many artists back then..
 
His feet are ugly, sure, but why would anyone think they're realistic. I don't take Smurfs hands/feet as realistic as well, doesn't mean I have to complain about it :/
Posted by cbishop
@Eyz said:
" @Abnormally Warm Guy: I think the problem was that people took his art, in the 90s, like it was the most beautiful art ever done, super realistic and the perfect template for superhero books...but his style, as good or bad as it is, is just simply "stylized", and shouldn't have been copy/pasted by so many artists back then..  His feet are ugly, sure, but why would anyone think they're realistic. I don't take Smurfs hands/feet as realistic as well, doesn't mean I have to complain about it :/ "

Rob Liefeld was the industry darling when he broke in.  He got to start on a hot book (New Mutants), and started another hot book (X-Force), clenching his cool factor with a commercial for Levis 501 jeans.  At the height of his popularity, Image started, and the first book from this industry shaking company was from?  Rob Liefeld.  Of course everyone copy/pasted his art style.  They wanted to be part of the latest thing, and try to leech on some of Liefeld's then-coolness. 
 
It did get way overdone though.  The art style got to be so copied that everything looked the same for awhile, and characters that didn't look good in that style suffered.  I think Liefeld has 5 things that really knocked him down to whipping-boy status: 1) Late books and books that never came out; 2) Having three different comic imprints in a short period of time; 3) Being involved with Heroes Reborn - a reinvention of Marvel characters that no one really wanted to see (and something that made it look like Liefeld and Jim Lee were "admitting" that Image was "a failure," because they went back to work for Marvel); 4) The actual problems with his art (which I think are blown out of proportion by haters, but there are problems), and 5) His own popularity - people love to see those at the top fall to the bottom, and then kick 'em when they're down.  I think what really fuels the haters though is that Liefeld never acts like he's down.  He just keeps going to the next thing.
Posted by jaberjaws91

You forgot Mike Mignola, this guy is a freaking genius his build up connecting stories, integration of mythology, he follows the Chekhov's gun rules and justifies each and every random thing in the book! and this read is so unpredictable! its exciting and his characters are superb! 
and Matt Fraction i think he is a good new age writer, Gabriel Ba and Fabio Moon. they draw and are both fantastic writers. 
I don't know why the comic community is so up in Morrison's balls i mean he is a stellar writer but the praise is overkill people! mark Waid deserves alot! also Ron Marz! look at darknees and artifacts this guy is the glue 4 Top cow! 
I'm also an aspiring writer too! and whether u like it or not u have to be working somewhere else and get enough recogntion before a comic company can even trust u with their characters!

Posted by cbishop
@jaberjaws91: Mike Mignola is a favorite, but he didn't really fit this list for me.  The way he integrates mythology into Hellboy is SUPERB, and I wish more companies were doing it.  That's why I mentioned Mignola on my way to thoughts on Wonder Woman, in Mining the Public Domain, OR Why Wonder Woman Should Be Better (in case you want to read that). ;) ...I maybe should have mentioned him on this list, because he has definitely boosted my existing desires to use mythology in my writing. 
 
Matt Fraction I've had limited exposure to.  I like his writing, but it doesn't really inspire me.  That doesn't make it bad, just not at the top of my list.  His stuff is fun though.  Loved what I read of Casanova
 
Top Cow stuff I check out every now and again, but I'm not a huge fan.  I want to be, but I just haven't been fully converted yet.  I always give them a careful look in the Previews, but the stories don't excite me.  I might be into them more if there weren't multiple versions of the same TPB's - makes it kind of confusing when looking for the next volume, or trying to determine if I've read it already or not. 
 
The rest of the guys you mentioned, I either don't know, or just am not inspired by. <shrugs>  
 
Your comment is much appreciated.  (I'm going to have to look up "Chekov's gun rules," btw) ;)
   
Posted by Abnormally Warm Guy
@Eyz: @cbishop: The thing about Liefield is that his style was different and therefore very interesting. And we he tried it is very good. NOTE: when he tries.
 
But then everyone thought "this is different and people like it, I'll do it too" then it wasn't different anymore and people began to hate it.
 
Liefield is the Lady gaga of 90's comic artists.
Posted by Eyz
@Abnormally Warm Guy: 
Ha! Exactly, wouldn't have said better XD
Posted by kid Apollo

great to see another writer explaining why he loves the writers he loves. i like how instead of takin' a dump for stuff they done that hasn't been so successful you give great examples of the positive things they've done for the industry/books. great article, and good luck with your future writings!

Posted by cbishop

@kid Apollo said:

great to see another writer explaining why he loves the writers he loves. i like how instead of takin' a dump for stuff they done that hasn't been so successful you give great examples of the positive things they've done for the industry/books. great article, and good luck with your future writings!

Well, the positives were the point of this blog, but they've got their downsides for sure - who doesn't? I'm sure I've mentioned downsides for some of them elsewhere. ;}