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3.08 stars 3.08/5 Stars Average score of 82 user reviews

Jason Aaron has used this twist ending before... 0

If I hadn't read Jason Aaron's issue of the Iron Fist spinoff "Immortal Weapons" mini featuring Fat Cobra, this issue would have been so much better.  But I have read that issue... which features a very similar twist... and for that, this issue suffers.  I don't want to say exactly what the twist is, to avoid spoilers, but let me just say... read Immortal Weapons #1, before or after reading this issue, and share my disappointment in Jason Aaron, for repeating himself like so.  That's not the onl...

1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Crushed to see this book go... 0

To this date, I still have not read a single issue of the original Milestone run of Xombi from the mid-90's.  And yet, this breezy 6 issue relaunch, that sadly ends here, has done more for me than practically any other regular series I've been buying.  The art has been amazing, the characters very likable, and the concepts MINDBLOWING.  Everything about this production has been top-notch... but the title was just too weird and too fringe to find enough of an audience.  That plus bad timing in it...

2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Capable, but a letdown after multiple AMAZING issues 0

After 3 or so issues of tense, absolutely breathtaking greatness that were all the more impressive for accomplishing that feat while being corporate-mandated crossover tie-ins, this issue is just alright.  Split down the middle between continuing Tony's subplot working with the Asgardian dwarfs and Pepper's with her fighting alongside Sasha Hammer against the possessed Grey Gargoyle, the story is less focused and a bit clunky.  Cutting back and forth between the two plots so often, this issue wi...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Fantastic one-off obscure character spotlight! 0

Where "companion" titles to the main crossover events of the past few years (Civil War / WWH Front Line, Siege Embedded, etc) have been so-so or outright bad... this anthology title is REALLY succeeding.  I'm enjoying this title more than I'm enjoying the core "Fear Itself" title; and that REALLY says something.  Much of this is due to the great strength of Christos Gage's Speedball storyline that's serialized throughout this title's entire 7 issues.  But it's not just that; each issue also has ...

2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Just end, please... 0

Well, this issue doesn't tread water so horrendously as the previous one did, but it still DRAGS.  More backstory from another member of the RRH who has never really been seen before, Wolverine squares off against Gunhawk, the last of the RRH's enforcers, and opens the door to their lair; TO BE CONTINUED.  Formulaic, to say the least.  As Wolverine has plowed through Gunhawk's gang, one or two members at a time, over the past four issues, it has gradually dawned on me how ridiculous it is for Wo...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Tough Sell of a Jumping-On point 0

This issue suffers badly from terrible, horrific VAGUENESS.  The first third or so of the issue is devoted to setting up a political meeting between parties that have no ties to the ongoing storyline of this title or the marvel universe as a whole, and to fully grasp what all it is getting at, it would help to have listened to a lot of NPR.  And then we get to War Machine.  Sort of.  Back from Fear Itself crossover land and returning to his own story, Jim Rhodes / War Machine meets with his supp...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Falling into place 0

This issue, and the past few before, have been performing a massive juggling act where every character in the book (and it has a surprisingly large cast) gets a few pages in each issue to progress their own subplots and to march them all towards coming together with most or all of them coinciding.  And this issue continues that trend.  It's getting a bit old, being tossed from one character to another at breakneck pace and with little to no transition beyond my own act of physically turning page...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Meh 0

By this point, I'm just waiting for this storyline to be done so I can drop this book (though Marvel may be doing that for me to some degree with a potential relaunch/re-title on the way).  I'm open to being pleasantly surprised with an amazing ending, but I highly doubt it.  I picked up this book on faith in DnA after their INCREDIBLE run on Guardians of the Galaxy.  They proved on that title that they have a knack for team books with eclectic lineups, and it doesn't get much more eclectic than...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Missing the fun 0

From day one of Greg Pak and Fred Van Lente's run on Hercules in the aftermath of World War Hulk, the title has been one of Marvel's most whimsical titles.  It's not a "funny book", as it's still a superhero title with plenty of action, but it's always been lighthearted.  And the "Herc" relaunch had continued that for most of its first arc.  But in this, the first arc's ending, most of the fun that makes this title stand out is missing.  On one hand that is largely appropriate, as this issue is ...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Effortlessly strong writing 0

This issue takes a breather from the warfare of Fear Itself to let the Academy students calm down and come to grips with what they've had to do.  And when this title takes a breather, it actually winds up throwing Absorbing Man and Titania at you.  Regardless, some amount of recuperation was achieved before this new battle begins, and the blending of having these young heroes coming to terms with what they've had to do, while the issue's villains are plotting to kill them most ruthlessly, is don...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

A bold though dull concept 0

This issue is one big rant.  A long-winded, nearly 4th-wall-breaking rant.  It's all about the philosophical implications of death in the superhero world, versus death in the normal civilian world.  And that's a very interesting concept to see so thoroughly explored in a mainstream superhero title.  It's ironic, it's ballsy... and it's really, REALLY boring.  I couldn't quite believe what I was reading (in a good way), and yet, at the same time,  I dearly wanted it to just be over.  I really and...

1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Soso storyline is a major step backwards for this title 0

The first 9-10 issues of this book, I begrudgingly adored.  I've been doing my best to steer clear of overhyped, overexposed X-Men stuff for years now, but this title, and Jason Aaron's Wolverine, I couldn't ignore.  And this title started off great.  Rick Remender really and truly understands each of his cast members, making the title truly compelling to read (and gorgeous to look at, too).  And yet, with this current storyline, with its publicity boost playing it up to be the biggest one yet, ...

1 out of 3 found this review helpful.

Back on track, but still missing something 0

With Kyle Baker's return, this book got right back on track, though still fell a little bit short of the level of quality I'd gotten used to from this book.  This is still a very fun issue with lots of craziness and beautiful art, but it's somehow lacking in some indeterminate "oomph" that I can't quite explain.  Nonetheless, I still highly recommend this series as a whole and I'm sure the seeds put down in this issue will grow either within the last two issues left of this volume, or at some po...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

A Great Example of What Crossover Tie-Ins Should Be 0

The Fear Itself tie-in issues of Matt Fraction's Invincible Iron Man have been, by FAR, the best Fear Itself tie-in issues I"ve read.  More than that, they are easily among the best EVENT tie-in stories I've ever read, PERIOD.  So often these corporate-mandated crossover tie-in issues are an annoying detour from ongoing plot threads, and are mediocre at best so that they don't even reward you for the delay, but these past few issues of Iron Man have been exceptionally strong.  The hammer-possess...

4 out of 4 found this review helpful.

Finally a morsel for loyal readers 0

After about 3 months of diversions and corporate-mandated crossover tie-ins... well, we're still mired in crossover tie-in, but at least here FINALLY loyal readers of Jeff Parker's run on this title are rewarded with a glimpse of most of the title's growing list of threats who have been shunted to the backburner for the past few months.  So while this issue is still a diversion from the nearly a year's worth of story that had been building so nicely before the diversion, at least here, FINALLY, ...

2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Falling hard for Christos Gage 0

If I could just review the installment of Christos Gage's Speedball story rather than this anthology issue as a whole, my rating would be much higher.  Unfortunately, due to three lackluster supporting features, the solid lead story suffers.  Christos Gage and Mike Mayhew's Speedball story has been strong from the first issue and keeps getting better.  Between here and his work on Avengers Academy (also featuring Speedball), Gage shows he has a strong grasp on the character.  More than that, in ...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Fantastic Second Half 0

For the second issue in a row, Christos Gage magnificently depicts the hardship that is having to make life-or-death calls to defend civilians when you are a superhero.   This situation has come of many, MANY times over the years, but I have never seen it handled so effectively and so heart-breakingly as I have here, with these heroes in training having no choice but to kill some of Sin's minions in order to stop them from firing on innocent civilians.  In the previous issue, I wasn't entirely s...

1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Decent crossover story 0

While this is another Marvel title that has had to take a detour from its actual storyline for a few MONTHS to make room for Fear Itself, and that's VERY annoying, I'd have to say that, as far as corporate-mandated crossover tie-in stories go, this one really hasn't been so bad.  I'll admit though, that I'm perhaps more than a little biased towards enjoying this story as it guest stars the entire lineup of The Immortal Weapons from Matt Fraction and Ed Brubaker's excellent run on "Iron Fist".  A...

1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Filler! Lousy paced-for-the-trade FILLER! 0

This issue is a SHOCKINGLY bad departure in Jason Aaron's otherwise EXCELLENT run on Wolverine to date (including Weapon X prior to the Wolverine relaunch).  Up till' now, this series had been so good it's actually made me angry at Jason Aaron for making me give a damn about Wolverine; a character I've been determined to ignore as much as I can manage due to the ridiculous overexposure he's enjoyed these past 20 or so years.  The past few issues in this story, depicting the past of various membe...

2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

First misfire 0

I'd have to say, this issue is Hickman's first misfire on his entire run on Fantastic Four into FF to date.  And that's really weird to say as this issue is written with very rich, flowing narrative that is quite rare in the graphic novel medium.  My problem is that while the story is very well written, and feels very grandiose in its style... it also feels trivial.  It feels a bit misleading and quite unnecessary.  So... hardly spoiler alert considering the cover... Black Bolt is returning.  Bu...

2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Strongest issue to date 0

I was incredibly disappointed when I got home from the comic store after buying this issue, flipped to the first page, and saw that my favorite comic artist, Leonardo Manco, who's the entire reason I'm buying this thus-far only so-so title, didn't do the art for this issue.  I felt cheated.  This issue's artist, Stephen Thompson, does decent enough work in this issue, but it is merely decent whereas Manco's ultra dark, ultra gritty style is PERFECTLY suited for this material.  And yet... despite...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

A Juggling Act 0

Izomie is a strange book.  That has its ups and downs.  The strangest thing I find with it is that, while something of such bizarre scope and with such great art can be so forgettable.  It isn't bad by any means, but this more than pretty much any other title I read on a monthly basis is the main one where I flip to the first page of the new issue and realize I can NOT remember for the life of me quite where the story left off last issue.  And this issue is no exception to that... but the creati...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Getting back on track 0

Alright, Red Hulk is back on earth and we can put the mis-fire that was "Planet Red Hulk" behind us and resume the quality work that is an average issue of Jeff Parker's run on this title.  Hooray!  Well... there's still some work to do.  And it's not going to get done anytime soon by the look of things as the subplots established in the book that got put on the backburner for Planet Red Hulk aren't back yet in this issue... and likely won't return for the next few issues either as next issue he...

2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Average 0

Meh... month-in / month-out, I for some reason or other continue to give this title a chance although it's ever "on the bubble" for me as probably the Marvel title I'm currently reading I'd be most likely to drop.  I keep trying it because I'm intrigued with the premise and I KNOW Abnett and Lanning have it in them to make this title "pop" (just re-read through their entire Guardians of the Galaxy and GOD is it good)... but this title still just... adamantly refuses to be better than aver...

1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

That's a bit more like it, Spencer! 0

FINALLY, after 5 so-so issues of Iron Man 2.0 and a few likewise so-so issues of Secret Avengers; FINALLY Nick Spencer has turned out a script for Marvel that shows off some of his promise and strong character-creation voice from his indie work!  It's taken about six months, but here, finally, faith in Nick Spencer from his strong work on T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents and Morning Glories pays off at Marvel.  In this one-off Fear Itself tie-in, Valkyrie receives the spotlight as the story shifts back and...

1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

What has become of Jeff Parker? 0

Month-in, month-out, Jeff Parker's Thunderbolts has been just about my favorite Marvel book since its revamp at the beginning of the "Heroic Age".  I've quite enjoyed Parker's run thus far on "Hulk" also.  Until the most recent issue of both titles.  I was mega excited for this issue when I realized it was giant-sized, as the prospect of more Thunderbolts goodness seemed a massive treat.  Parker's run on the title for the past year has set the quality bar quite high for me.   And then... nothing...

3 out of 4 found this review helpful.

Hit-and-Miss 0

Thus far, I've enjoyed this anthology "universe of event" series more often than not.  It's been providing an interior art showcase for cover art mainstay Mike Mayhew, it's had solid writers on board with Peter Milligan and Christos Gage, and each issue features a one-pager by legend Howard Chaykin.  There's a lot to like.  This issue runs a bit weaker than the previous two for the lead stories.  The Speedball story continues to be decent, but Milligan's Agents of Atlas story... I don't know; it...

3 out of 3 found this review helpful.

Inconsequential 0

With the conclusion to the quickie 2-part "Red Planet Hulk", this formerly strong series is free to return to the multiple plot threads it's been slowly building up and getting back on track.  Only... apparently not, as the only real consequence of this story was that it keeps Red Hulk off of earth when Omegex arrives, which sends Omegex away to search for Red Hulk elsewhere; further delaying this inevitable confrontation that has been building for some time now.  Rather than get back to that, w...

3 out of 3 found this review helpful.

Weak issue of an otherwise awesome series 0

This issue... baffles me.  This book, conducted in a series of loosely connected done-in-one stories, has for the most part been of excellent quality.  I was crushed halfway through when I saw issues numbered in solicitations as (of 12), indicating it was ending there; though the solicit for issue 12 mentioning "end of the first year of the book" seems to indicate there will be a second eventually, so hope is not lost.  Anyways... this issue on its own.  This issue is REALLY weak.  It's like one...

3 out of 4 found this review helpful.

Rushed 0

The timing and conception of this breezy 2-part story (it's already being concluded next issue) befuddles me.  Parker's run on the title thus far has been a blast, with the first storyline flowing into the second fairly organically, and even working the .1 issue into the core story  It's a title that rewards the long-term reader by laying the groundwork for future events and battles well in advance and letting them simmer gradually until the current story is finished.  This issue throws that out...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Clever 0

I wouldn't call Bendis' Moon Knight a "revamp" or "re-imagining" of the character, but there's something here that's certainly different.  It's just not new.  Moon Knight's always been a schizophrenic character, so having him talking to himself and shifting between personas isn't new... but talking to and shifting between variations of Spider-Man, Wolverine and Captain America (all of whom he can partially copy with a combination of his resources, training and slightly superhuman abilities), IS ...

2 out of 3 found this review helpful.

New-Reader-Unfriendly relaunch 0

So far the new Hellraiser book, which I was psyched about for Leonardo Manco's art, hasn't made much of an impression on me.  I actually had to flip through the first issue again after reading this new issue just to refresh my memory on what had come before; and that's something I pretty much NEVER have to do for a monthly book, so it's not a good sign.This title suffers from terrible vagueness.  Seemingly big things are happening, with some sort of plot from the cenobites drawing Kirsty Cotton ...

0 out of 1 found this review helpful.

Yeah, so Bendis can leave the 'All Ages' market alone... 0

This isn't a bad book..  Rather, as I turned the last page, I was just left feeling entirely indifferent to it.  I'm usually the sort who, once I buy volume 1 of a series by an author I like, I'll at least give it a chance through volume 2; but with this one I"m not so rue.I felt that Bendis restrained himself SO much here in order to remain "all ages" appropriate that he loses the older age group audience.  This is a big problem that many creators have when getting into this subgenre, especiall...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Incredible Anthology 0

I somehow missed this book completely when it was released.  I guess they did one like it for Shang-Chi as well (giant-sized, black and white, shorts).  I don't know why this book didn't receive more buzz than it did, as it has one HELL of a lineup of creators.I happened onto this book thanks to this very website listing it under my favorite comic artist Ted McKeever's credits.  On my next trip to the comic store I sought it out and still found it on the shelf though it was most of a year old.  ...

1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

At least the art is pretty... 0

With one more issue to go, this mini is shaping up to be a largely forgettable affair populated with obscure characters who are so obscure even I don't have any attachment to them (I generally love obscure character revivals, having been drawn to this series earlier on for the art and for The Stranger and Ego the Living Planet, but... Zephyr??? WHO???).The art on this book is gorgeous and will be the sole reason to look back on it once it's done in one more issue.  Robert Rodi as a comics writer...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.

Premise running thin 0

This series was really fun at first.  I really liked the main character's true voice she kept secret to herself behind her perfect housewife facade.  The premise, while not entirely unique, was a lot of fun and it was classic Garth Ennis.Three issues in... it's kinda the same play-by-play deal each issue.  If something new and different doesn't happen soon, this series is going to wind up being a boring, black mark on Ennis' body of work.  I'm sure he's got something in mind for where this story...

3 out of 5 found this review helpful.

Come for the art, stay for the cleverness 0

I picked this up for the art.  I like Frazer Irving enough to have used his art style as the basis for a theater makeup design class project in college.  So yeah... never read the original series but I figured it'd be worth the cover price for the pretty pictures alone.And it is.  But there's much more here.  While this book absolutely has back-story that's some 15 years old and isn't readily available in print, it manages to relaunch in a surprisingly new-reader-friendly fashion (and, miraculou...

2 out of 3 found this review helpful.

Well thank God THAT'S over... 0

I was thrilled to have the opportunity to buy the first issue of this new Thunderstrike series at the same comic store I'd purchased the final issue of the original at some 15 years prior.  The original Thunderstrike (Eric Masterson) is still a character that fills me with happy nostalgia, and who I still feel is one of the most personable characters Marvel ever produced.  I was crushed that Marvel felt the need to all out kill him off rather than to just cancel the book and allow the character ...

1 out of 1 found this review helpful.

A bit Awkward 0

This is the first issue of  Spencer's T.H.U.N.D.E.R Agents that has shown any signs of flaw.  And it's nothing much to worry about; there just isn't a whole heck of a lot going on in the issue, and the issue's ending subplot is set up in a rushed way that could have used SOME sort of establishment (time/place sort of info) that's likely a victim of DC's "drawing the line at $2.99" initiative cutting down a little on page count.  The transition between the wrap-up of the previous story and settin...

2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

Making mainstream books look BAD 0

Well worth the prolonged wait after the first issue (this issue's "Next Issue" ad/blurb indicates it was already released 2 weeks ago), this series, like Spencer's T.H.U.N.D.E.R Agents's latest issue's review on its cover (also out this week) is "a classic in the making".  Nick Spencer's more personal, less mainstream (IE Not "Iron Man 2.0") works contain some of the most mindblowing concepts and clever writing outside of late 80's / early 90's era Grant Morrison.The art in this book, which I as...

3 out of 3 found this review helpful.