The Justice Society in the DCNu? by Michael Doran

#1 Posted by DMC (1551 posts) - - Show Bio

I never thought of it till I read this article over on Newsarama. Throwing the question out there would be good enough but I'll throw in the article anyways. 
 

“Every title will start fresh with a number one and feature a new modern outlook...”

“...modernize the DC Universe.”

“...something brand-new and fresh...”

“...more modern and diverse 21st century.”

“...our characters are younger and the stories are being told for today's audience."

Those are just a few of the quotes coming from DC Entertainment Tuesday about their plans to "revamp" their entire line of DC Universe books beginning in September.

Together with the announcement about same-day digital distribution of their entire output, which will all relaunch with new #1 issues, DC was very successful in creating the impression that while valuing their current readers, they want and need new ones.

...And younger ones.

...And from more diverse walks of life than your typical comic book-buying demo.

The intent of their master plan is unassailable. Their execution will be the rub — the public's appetite for it remains to be seen, and its ultimate success is anyone's guess.

But what we can say now is what most sixth graders learn in science class; that every action has an equal and opposite reaction. With this clear new emphasis on new, young and modern, Newsarama can’t help asking ourselves this afternoon...

How the hell does the Justice Society of America fit into the fresh new "DCNu"?

Now, if you’re reading this with us, we probably don’t have to explain to you who the Justice Society is, or detail their utter whopper of a history in the DC Universe. Long story short — the foundation of the team is superheroes that fought in World War II.

No, not the Second Gulf War. The “Big One”. The one that took place in the 1940s that your grandfather and history teachers go on and on about.

That makes the JSA like, really really old, dude, and decidedly not modern.

Now, to be fair, a majority of the most current incarnation of the JSA are "legacy" characters — the sons and daughters and grandkids of many of the original team members. DC even recently tried giving some of the lesser-geriatric members of the team an ongoing series of their own, JSA All-Stars, but it can no longer count itself among the currently published.

But be all that as it may, even the staunchest fans of the series would likely to acknowledge that the Justice Society concept is indeed "legacy" — a continuation of tradition, a celebration of history, and an acknowledgement of the enduring nature of heroism.

"Legacy." "Tradition." "History." "Grandkids."

"Brand New." "Fresh." "Modern." "Younger."

See what we're getting at here?

Now to be fair again, DC’s greatest heroes — Superman, Batman, Robin and Wonder Woman — are in fact older then DC’s superheroes of the Greatest Generation. The secondary core of their Universe are mostly products of the early 60’s and, by god, man, if Tim Drake actually aged he’d be pushing 40 soon. (Maybe he became Red Robin to hide his combover?)

But fans accept DC sending these icons to the editorial-slash-continuity Lazarus Pit every decade or so.

That's not so easy with The Justice Society of America.

Sure, you can take the heroes out of WWII, but can you take the WWII out of the heroes? What are the JSA if not the elder statesmen and torchbearers of the DCU? Even if you took out the 90-somethings from the line-up, what else do they stand for?

Heck, even their very name is a constant reminder of their place as predecessors to the Justice League, the centerpiece of DC's new September youthful, modern initiative.

There is even some precedent here. After 1985-86's original Crisis of Infinite Earth (the now granddaddy of DC reboots), despite the Justice Society being merged onto the same singular Earth with their Silver Age counterparts, their existence was somewhat deemphasized by DC. It wasn't until 5 years later that the JSA emerged as star of their own titles, and it wasn't until James Robinson and David Goyer's 1999 revival JSA that the team truly reestablished a foothold in the DCU.

And irony alert - it was Geoff Johns, undoubtedly one of the architects of the new DCU, who gained much oh his fan-favorite status working on that title with Goyer, then solo, then relaunching it as Justice Socety of America

So with the blinds being raised and DC going all-in on new and young in September, does it make any sense for the publisher to deal in a team and characters who can’t help serve as reminder of how old their stable of characters  really are?

Newsarama is going to guess "no." Of the 52 titles being launched or relaunched this August and September, we’ll be surprised if the Justice Society is among them.

But that’s just us.

What do you think?


  http://www.newsarama.com/comics/dcnu-justice-society-110601.html
#2 Posted by PrinceIMC (5421 posts) - - Show Bio

I'm curious. A streamlining I can handle, kind of like they did back with the first Crisis. I don't want Superman or Wonder Woman trying to use slang though.

#3 Posted by Bearded Justice (751 posts) - - Show Bio

wwweeelll im gonna go lock myself in the basement and call it a lifetime
#4 Posted by alias44 (47 posts) - - Show Bio

I have a sick feeling there isn't going to be a JSA.  And looking at some of the new costuming (like Canary on the BOP Cover) I'm pretty sure this reboot is going to be a big f-ing mistake of a spectacular proportion.

#5 Posted by alias44 (47 posts) - - Show Bio

      1. All-Star Western #1 by Justin Gray and Jimmy Palmiotti
      and Moritat
      2. Animal Man #1 by Jeff Lemire and Travel Foreman and Dan Green
      3. Aquaman #1 by Geoff Johns and Ivan Reis
      4. Batgirl #1 by Gail Simone, Ardian Syaf and Vicente Cifuentes
      5. Batman #1 by Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo
      6. Batman: The Dark Knight #1 by David Finch
      7. Batman and Robin #1 by Peter Tomasi and Patrick Gleason
      8. Batwing #1 by Judd Winick and Ben Oliver
      9. Batwoman #1 by J.H. Williams III, Haden Blackman and Amy Reeder
      10. Birds Of Prey #1 by Duane Swierczynski and Jesus Saiz
      11. Blackhawks #1 by Mike Costa and Ken Lashley
      12. Blue Beetle #1, by Tony Bedard Ig Guara and Ruy Jose.
      13. Captain Atom #1 by JT Krul and Freddie Williams II
      14. Catwoman #1 by Judd Winick and Guillem March
      15. DC Universe Presents #1 by Paul Jenkins and Bernard Chang
      16. Deathstroke#1 by Kyle Higgins and Joe Bennett and Art Thibert
      17. Demon Knights #1 by Paul Cornell and Diogenes Neves and Oclair Albert
      18. Detective Comics #1 by Tony Daniel
      19. Flash #1 by Brian Buccellato and Francis Manapul
      20. Frankenstein: Agent of SHADE #1 by Jeff Lemire and Alberto Ponticelli
      21. Fury of Firestorm #1 by Gail Simone, Ethan Van Sciver and Yildiray Cinar
      22. Green Arrow #1 by JT Krul and Dan Jurgens
      23. Green Lantern #1 by Geoff Johns, Doug Mahnke and Christian Alamy
      24. Green Lantern Corps #1 by Peter J. Tomasi, Fernando Pasarin and Scott Hanna
      25. Green Lanterns: New Guardians #1 by Tony Bedard, Tyler Kirkham and Batt
      26 Grifter #1 by Nathan Edmondson and Cafu and Bit
      27 Hawk and Dove #1 by Sterling Gates and Rob Liefeld
      28. I, Vampire by Josh Fialkov and Andrea Sorrentino
      29. JLA#1 by Geoff Johns and Jim Lee
      30. Justice League Dark #1 by Peter Milligan and Mikel Janin
      31. Justice League International #1 by Dan Jurgens and Aaron Lopresti
      32. Legion Lost #1 by Fabian Niceiza and Pete Woods
      33. Legion of Super-Heroes #1 by Paul Levitz and Francis Portela
      34. Mr Terrific #1 by Eric Wallace and Roger Robinson
      35. Nightwing #1 by Kyle Higgins and Eddy Barrows
      36. OMAC by Dan Didillio, Keith Giffen and Scott Koblish
      37. Red Hood and The Outlaws #1 by Scott Lobdell and Kenneth Rocafort
      38. Red Lanterns #1 by Peter Milligan, Ed Benes and Rob Hunter
      39. Resurrection Man #1 by Dan Abnett, Andy Lanning and Fernando Dagnino
      40 Savage Hawkman #1 byTony Daniel and Philip Tan
      41. Sgt. Rock and the Men of War #1 by Ivan Brandon and
      Tom Derenick
      42. Static Shock #1 by John Rozum, Scott McDaniel and Jonathan Glapion
      43 Stormwatch #1 by Paul Cornell and Miguel Sepulveda
      44. Suicide Squad #1 by Adam Glass and Marco Rudy
      45. Swamp Thing #1 by Scott Snyder and Yanick Paquette w/Francesco Francavilla
      46. Teen Titans #1 by Scott Lobdell Brett Booth and Norm Rapmund
      47. Voodoo #1 by Ron Marz and Sami Basri
      48. Wonder Woman #1 by Brian Azzarello and Cliff Chiang


      That leaves Superman, Action Comics, Supergirl and Superboy.  They've released
      pics (that appear to be covers) of Superman, Supergirl and Superboy. I doubt
      they're going to cancel Action -- which means there's no Power Girl or JSA.
      I can't spew enough profanity to show how I feel.

#6 Posted by alias44 (47 posts) - - Show Bio
@Adnan said:
@alias44: Wait until you read the story first, then feel free to call it a big f-ing disaster dude ;]   Also, there are already some titles in the works that won't be released till a little after these 52 titles (e.g. a Speedforce book), so maybe JSA and Power Girl books aren't a lost hope.
You're right.  And I'll keep buying.  Hell, I've been collecting since '74. Old junkies never change....
#7 Posted by alias44 (47 posts) - - Show Bio

Here's the final list:
No JSA
01. Action Comics by Grant Morrison and Rags Morales
02. All-Star Western #1 by Justin Gray and Jimmy Palmiotti and Moritat
03. Animal Man #1 by Jeff Lemire and Travel Foreman and Dan Green
04. Aquaman #1 by Geoff Johns and Ivan Reis
05. Batgirl #1 by Gail Simone, Ardian Syaf and Vicente Cifuentes
06. Batman #1 by Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo
07. Batman: The Dark Knight #1 by David Finch
08. Batman and Robin #1 by Peter Tomasi and Patrick Gleason
09. Batwing #1 by Judd Winick and Ben Oliver
10. Batwoman #1 by J.H. Williams III, Haden Blackman and Amy Reeder
11. Birds Of Prey #1 by Duane Swierczynski and Jesus Saiz
12. Blackhawks #1 by Mike Costa and Ken Lashley
13. Blue Beetle #1, by Tony Bedard Ig Guara and Ruy Jose.
14. Captain Atom #1 by JT Krul and Freddie Williams II
15. Catwoman #1 by Judd Winick and Guillem March
16. DC Universe Presents #1 by Paul Jenkins and Bernard Chang
17. Deathstroke#1 by Kyle Higgins and Joe Bennett and Art Thibert
18. Demon Knights #1 by Paul Cornell and Diogenes Neves and Oclair Albert
19. Detective Comics #1 by Tony Daniel
20. Flash #1 by Brian Buccellato and Francis Manapul
21. Frankenstein: Agent of SHADE #1 by Jeff Lemire and Alberto Ponticelli
22. Fury of Firestorm #1 by Gail Simone, Ethan Van Sciver and Yildiray Cinar
23. Green Arrow #1 by JT Krul and Dan Jurgens
24. Green Lantern #1 by Geoff Johns, Doug Mahnke and Christian Alamy
25. Green Lantern Corps #1 by Peter J. Tomasi, Fernando Pasarin and Scott Hanna
26. Green Lanterns: New Guardians #1 by Tony Bedard, Tyler Kirkham and Batt
27  Grifter #1 by Nathan Edmondson and Cafu and Bit
28  Hawk and Dove #1 by Sterling Gates and Rob Liefeld
29. I, Vampire by Josh Fialkov and Andrea Sorrentino
30. JLA#1 by Geoff Johns and Jim Lee
31. Justice League Dark #1 by Peter Milligan and Mikel Janin
32. Justice League International #1 by Dan Jurgens and Aaron Lopresti
33. Legion Lost #1 by Fabian Niceiza and Pete Woods
34. Legion of Super-Heroes #1 by Paul Levitz and Francis Portela
35. Mr Terrific #1 by Eric Wallace and Roger Robinson
36. Nightwing #1 by Kyle Higgins and Eddy Barrows
37. OMAC by Dan Didillio, Keith Giffen and Scott Koblish
38. Red Hood and The Outlaws #1 by Scott Lobdell and Kenneth Rocafort
39. Red Lanterns #1 by Peter Milligan, Ed Benes and Rob Hunter
40. Resurrection Man #1 by Dan Abnett, Andy Lanning and Fernando Dagnino
41  Savage Hawkman #1 byTony Daniel and Philip Tan
42. Sgt. Rock and the Men of War #1 by Ivan Brandon and Tom Derenick
43. Static Shock #1 by John Rozum, Scott McDaniel and Jonathan Glapion
44  Stormwatch #1 by Paul Cornell and Miguel Sepulveda
45. Suicide Squad #1 by Adam Glass and Marco Rudy
46. Superboy #1 by Scott Lobdell, R.B. Silva and Rob Lean
47. Supergirl #1 by Michael Green and Mike Johnson and Mahmud Asrar
48. Superman #1 by George Perez and Jesus Merino (REALLY?)
49. Swamp Thing #1 by Scott Snyder and Yanick Paquette w/Francesco Francavilla
50. Teen Titans #1 by Scott Lobdell Brett Booth and Norm Rapmund
51. Voodoo #1 by Ron Marz and Sami Basri
52. Wonder Woman #1 by Brian Azzarello and Cliff Chiang

#8 Edited by brc2000 (1679 posts) - - Show Bio

I can handle there not being any JSA titles for the time being. But if there's no JSA in the DCU period, it's going to suck. One of the reasons I prefer DC over Marvel, is because for the most part they respect the classic superhero thing. Now it looks like that's changing to appeal to the X-box/Facebook/anime generation. I'm still honestly looking forward to this, because they still have a giant roster of talent, but I'm not sure if I'm going to enjoy DC as much as I used to.

#9 Posted by alias44 (47 posts) - - Show Bio

I've been a JSA fan since '77.  It's what brought me to DC.  Nearing 50, the idea of generational continuity is very comforting.  Without that -- I just don't know....

#10 Posted by matthew corleone (12 posts) - - Show Bio

Alright I've read somewhere that the 52 new titles that will be released are the first set.They're teh starters and there is more comics in the work.Eventually more titles will be released and I am sure the Justice Society and many more other titles such as Legion and Secret Six will be released

#11 Posted by alias44 (47 posts) - - Show Bio

From CBR:


One of the many questions surrounding DC Comics’ line-wide renumbering centered on the absence of Justice Society of America, a title that in recent years had undergone its own high-profile reboot and spawned two spinoff series. The Justice Society, with a sprawling membership that includes Golden Age characters (or their namesakes) like The Flash, Hawkman, Green Lantern and Hourman, reached deep into DC, and comic-book, history, forming the very first team of superheroes.


But Justice Society wasn’t among the 52 books rolled out by the publisher last week. Neither, for that matter, was Power Girl, whose title character has been closely associated with the JSA since her debut in 1976. And the solicitation for Mister Terrific #1, featuring a new take on “the world’s third-smartest man” — and two-time chairman of the team — makes no mention of the group. Then came the unveiling on Friday of Action Comics #1 which, as Robot 6′s J.K. Parkin pointed out, refers to “a world that doesn’t trust their first Super Hero.”


If all of that isn’t enough to signal the end, or non-existence, of the world’s first team of superheroes, official word came over the weekend from Co-Publisher Dan DiDio, who wrote on his Facebook page, “As for JSA, we have decided to rest this concept while we devote our attention on the launch of the three new Justice League series. As for other characters and series not part of the initial 52, there are plenty of stories to be told, and we’re just getting started.”


As with any demise in superhero comics, this one is probably only temporary (heck, the JSA itself has been put to “rest,” only to be resurrected, a handful of times over the past 60 years). However, when the publisher is pushing a “modern” and “contemporary” take on its superhero universe, grappling with graying characters so firmly rooted in World War II will undoubtedly prove problematic.


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