The Jeph Loeb wiki last edited by dagmar_merrill on 03/04/14 03:46PM View full history

Overview

Joseph 'Jeph' Loeb III is an internationally acclaimed writer who has had successes in both the comic book industry & television. His career spans over 25 years, during which time he has been nominated for an Emmy, and won 4 Eisner Awards & 5 Wizard Awards,

Television & Movies

Jeph Loeb first had his work filmed and released on the big screen in 1985. That year he co-authored the script to 1985's Michael J Fox movie, Teen Wolf and the Arnold Schwarzenegger action thriller, Commando. He continued to work collaboratively with co-writer Matthew Weisman on films like Burglar and Teen Wolf Too.

In 1991 Loeb began working on a film adaptation of The Flash. This brought him into contact with Jeanette Khan. Although the Flash movie fell through, Khan invited Loeb to write stories for DC Comics.

He began writing for the Superman spin-off live-action series Smallville in 2002 with the episode entitled 'Red'. This led to him becoming the show's new Executive Producer, and he has written dozens of scripts for the show since. He was contracted to work on the show for three seasons, and was given a longer period of work. However, Loeb left Smallville to help care for his son who had been diagnosed with cancer.

Loeb returned to television when he became the writer and producer for Lost. This was soon followed with Heroes for NBC. The series featured an international cast of people who discovered that they had super-powers. Writing characters with super heroes was second nature to Loeb, and the show was an international success. This earned him his Emmy Nomination in 2007, along with several awards from a variety of television associated bodies.

He has since started to publicize his newest project; Sargasso Planet.

Comics

Loeb's influence on comics actually goes back to his teens, when he provided the idea for Elliot S! Maggin's most revered Superman story, Must There Be A Superman?

Although writing for comics came after his work in the movies, Loeb is best known for his work in the comic book industry. He began working for DC Comics on Challengers of the Unknown between March & October 1991, in which he was teamed-up with artist Tim Sale. The two quickly established a rapport and began a successful career together.

The Loeb-Sale partnership resulted in a series of popular deluxe-bound Batman Legends of the Dark Knight Halloween one-shots, which in turn lead to the hugely popular Batman: The Long Halloween in 1996 and it's sequel Batman: Dark Victory 3 years later. During that time Loeb had already begun working for Marvel, handling popular characters & teams like Captain America & the Avengers. Marvel were keen to reunite Loeb with Sale, and therefore published their 'color' limited series; Daredevil: Yellow, Spider-Man: Blue, Hulk: Gray & Captain America: White. All were in the similar vein to Long Halloween, taking a character back to their roots to retell their origins.

Loeb has not limited his work to the 'Big Two'. He has continued to work with as many artists and publishers as possible. His collaborations have included the likes of Chris Bachalo ( Witching Hour), Ian Churchill ( Coven) & Rob Liefeld ( Re:Gex).

Later, Loeb returned to DC Comics with Sale for Superman For All Seasons & Catwoman: When In Rome, and continued to work with Churchill on the relaunched Supergirl title. He has since bounced back to Marvel where he worked with Joe Madureira on Ultimates 3, as well as destroyed the population of Marvel's Ultimate Universe in Ultimatum, and wrote the hugely successful Captain America mini series Fallen Son: The Death Of Captain America, which was the biggest selling comic of 2007. More recently, Loeb has created the mysteries of the Red Hulk & Red She-Hulk in the new Hulk series.

In June 2010, Marvel Entertainment announced that Loeb had been assigned the position of Executive Vice President, Head of Television. He is currently working with publisher Dan Buckley at creating live action and animated shows based on the various Marvel characters.

Family Tragedy

On 17 June 2005, Loeb's 17 year-old son Sam passed away after fighting cancer for three years. He had already begun to follow his father's footsteps by writing a few stories for DC Comics. When Sam died, he had been working on a story for Superman/Batman #26.

To honor Sam, Loeb enlisted the aid of 25 other professional comic book writers & artists to help finish Sam's story. Loeb's collaborators on 'The Boys Are Back In Town' were (in alphabetical order, by surname): Joe Casey, John Cassaday, Joyce Chin, Ian Churchill, Allan Heinberg, Geoff Johns, Joe Kelly, Mike Kunkel, Jim Lee, Pat Lee, Rob Liefeld, Paul Levitz, Joe Madureira, Jeff Matsuda, Ed McGuinness, Brad Meltzer, Carlos Pacheco, Duncan Rouleau, Tim Sale, Richard Starkings, Michael Turner, Brian K Vaughan, Mark Verheiden & Joss Whedon. Despite having exclusive contracts that restricted them to only work with Marvel, Cassaday & Whedon were permitted to work for DC in order to help Loeb with the story. 'The Boys Are Back In Town', was printed with a back-up story called 'Sam's Story' about a young lad who had cancer, with art by Tim Sale.

To date, when questioned about what his favorite story is that he's written, Loeb will reply that it is his work on Superman/Batman #26.

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