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Origin

John Godolkin initially kidnapped six children from different homes. They were taken to a secret training center in upstate New York and given weekly injections of Compound-V until they either developed super powers or died. After their powers activated, the children were raised with an unlimited bank account, as well as a not terribly strict system of discipline that followed only one rule, protect the secrets of the G-Men at all costs. Beyond that one unbreakable rule, every human inhibition and taboo was fair game. Godolkin further reinforced this by regularly sexually molesting the children, eventually allowing key officers in Vought-American to join in. On March 31st, 1984, Godolkin sent a business proposal to The President of Operations in the Superhuman Development Division of Vought-American, outlining his plans for a series of super powered teams that catered to a less lofty notion of heroes from the streets. The teams would be market branded as outcasts from normal society and underdogs that pandered to a more modern consumer sensibility than Vought-American's current stable of super hero teams. The rest was money-making history. The G-Teams quickly became Vought-American's most profitable heroes.

Creation

The G-Men were created as a blatant parody of Marvel Comics Uncanny X-Men by Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson for their series The Boys at Dynamite Entertainment.

The G-Men have no relation or creation connections to Tony 'G-Man' Guerrero.

Team Evolution

The Boys surveillance breakdown of the G-Teams

Godolkin's initial team, The G-men were Vought-American's most popular and bankable superheroes. This was in no small part due to their image as downtrodden outcasts, orphans, and runaways. With the help of Vought-American's marketing team, Godolkin eventually created a series of sister teams. These included; G-Force, The G-Brits, The G-Nomads, G-Coast, G-Style and G-Wiz, expanding his characters and brand name globally. Godolkin ultimately created a group of pre-schoolers called Pre-Wiz, which several Vought-American officers tried to stop him from forming, due to the potential PR backlash should Godolkin's sexual proclivities ever become exposed. Vought-American executives eventually determined that Godolkin and the G-Teams were a public relations liability, and they were massacred by Red River operatives at their base of operations in upstate New York in front of the Boys, who were about to start a fight against them.

Major Story Arcs

The G-men to date have only one story arc which runs from The Boys issue 23 though issue 30. The story is titled collectively, "We Gotta Go Now," a direct reference to the song Louie Louie by The Kingsmen. The song and its prominent use in the movie Animal House have a direct correlation to the story of The G-Men, especially the G-Wiz team. The story follows Wee Hughie from The Boys as he successfully infiltrates the G-Wiz team in order to bug the G-Men base of operations.

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