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#1 Edited by _Gaff_ (3435 posts) - - Show Bio

We all secretly wish we were a Martial Arts master. Which one would you like to be trained in?

#2 Edited by CaptainUzi (1679 posts) - - Show Bio

I've been trained in and mastered Wing Chun's chum kiu form. I've gotten the basics of Tiger style from the southern shaolin 5 animal styles. I suppose I'd either finish learning Tiger and it's substyle leopard or maybe change to Krav Maga for some grappling since Wing Chun is mostly striking and clinching.

#3 Posted by CaptainUzi (1679 posts) - - Show Bio
#4 Posted by Z3RO180 (6591 posts) - - Show Bio

When I was a kid I did tie qwan do.

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#5 Posted by Crom-Cruach (8869 posts) - - Show Bio

Probably Baritsu or MAC

#6 Edited by _Gaff_ (3435 posts) - - Show Bio

@captainuzi: Do you knowany thing about Hapkido? That the one i want to learn.

#7 Posted by CaptainUzi (1679 posts) - - Show Bio
@_gaff_ said:

@captainuzi: Do you knowany thing about Hapkido? That the one i want to learn.

I know hapkido is the art of cane fighting, and I've also been told that you'll need a cane before you master it lol.

#8 Posted by RogueShadow (10869 posts) - - Show Bio

I trained in Judo & Karate for a few years, I'd like to go back & master them. Aside from that, Baritsu, Bagua & Ninjitsu.

#9 Posted by CaptainUzi (1679 posts) - - Show Bio

I trained in Judo & Karate for a few years, I'd like to go back & master them. Aside from that, Baritsu, Bagua & Ninjitsu.

Not supposed to mention that one Sihan.

#10 Posted by Wolverine08 (42841 posts) - - Show Bio

Would like to start ninjutsu and kung fu.

#11 Posted by CaptainUzi (1679 posts) - - Show Bio

Keep in mind, there are a few styles you're not supposed to mention. They're intended to be used as trump cards, last resorts, and unofficial part of your style.

#12 Posted by _Gaff_ (3435 posts) - - Show Bio
#13 Edited by CaptainUzi (1679 posts) - - Show Bio

@_gaff_:

Considering what I went through for orientation, this was when Jackie was first beginning in Hapkido. I'll bet you my life that he still hasn't mastered it.

#14 Posted by Perethorn (3402 posts) - - Show Bio

Drunken Boxing

#15 Posted by CaptainUzi (1679 posts) - - Show Bio

@perethorn:

Oooh, the 7 drunken gods is very tough, but very good. Are you familiar with it at all?

#16 Posted by Xwraith (18665 posts) - - Show Bio

Any of the ones where I get to use a sword.

#17 Posted by Jonny_Anonymous (33631 posts) - - Show Bio

Muay Boran

#18 Posted by CaptainUzi (1679 posts) - - Show Bio

@xwraith:

Look into kendo then. Or maybe even fencing. Or if you wanna be REALLY good, you can master one then master the other.

#19 Posted by Xwraith (18665 posts) - - Show Bio

@captainuzi: I actually did do fencing once:

Yes, this is me.

#20 Posted by _Gaff_ (3435 posts) - - Show Bio
#21 Edited by Xwraith (18665 posts) - - Show Bio

@_gaff_: It was for the scoring system.

#22 Posted by CaptainUzi (1679 posts) - - Show Bio

@xwraith: Sur vos gardes puis, mon ami. J'ai beaucoup de pratique dans le kendo. :D

#23 Edited by CaptainUzi (1679 posts) - - Show Bio

My Kendo vs your fencing, or any fencing really, would be an interesting match,

#24 Posted by Joygirl (20045 posts) - - Show Bio

Master? Like master master? Ninjutsu I guess.

#25 Posted by CaptainUzi (1679 posts) - - Show Bio

@joygirl said:

Master? Like master master? Ninjutsu I guess.

Seriously, it's like breaking the first rule of fight club. Ninjas are anon, they don't like to be identified.

#26 Edited by Joygirl (20045 posts) - - Show Bio

@captainuzi: Yeah well I wouldn't tell anyone once I WAS a ninja. I'd just, y'know, be a ninja.

#27 Posted by CaptainUzi (1679 posts) - - Show Bio
#28 Posted by Nelomaxwell (10550 posts) - - Show Bio
#29 Edited by Racob7 (5792 posts) - - Show Bio

Krav Maga + combat chi= human tank

#30 Posted by mikethekiller (8424 posts) - - Show Bio

I'm doing muay thai right now.

#31 Edited by Guardiandevil83 (5680 posts) - - Show Bio

Wing Chun. Muay Thai, Shotokan

#32 Posted by MonsterStomp (18244 posts) - - Show Bio

Krav Maga

#33 Posted by Immortal777 (7625 posts) - - Show Bio

Kung Fu as a whole if anyone could truly master it they'd be the best MA/fighter in history.

#34 Posted by Mr_Winchester (708 posts) - - Show Bio

MMA.

#35 Posted by Mega_spidey01 (3078 posts) - - Show Bio

whatever style michael jai white knows.

#36 Posted by MaccyD (4175 posts) - - Show Bio

Fisticuffs!

#37 Posted by The Stegman (24648 posts) - - Show Bio

Baguazhang

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#38 Posted by TheThe (1739 posts) - - Show Bio

ai ki do! It suits me the most, even though i used to practice Kwan ki do.

#39 Posted by youmessinwithme (1189 posts) - - Show Bio

Muay thai, Brazilian or american jiu-jitsu and TKD, i don't know if you'd consider boxing a martial art or something you could master either, but i'd definitely like to get better at boxing and kick boxing. Judo and college wrestling are impoirtant too but not what i'd be looking to learn first.

#40 Posted by Pr0metheus (5171 posts) - - Show Bio

Whichever one that is used to make you use your environment as a weapon.

#41 Edited by DoomGuy (772 posts) - - Show Bio

JKD

#42 Posted by Baberaham_Lincoln (937 posts) - - Show Bio

I'm interested in Silat Gayong or Muay Thai... both are really freaking interesting. Wing Chun is cool and all, but i've never really seen any kicking 'game' involved, do correct me if i'm wrong.

#43 Edited by Deadite (24209 posts) - - Show Bio

Dim Mak, the touch of death. Don't know if it's real or if it's practical enough in real combat, but if it's real, I would like to learn how to use it.

The Touch of Death (or Death-Point Striking) refers to any martial arts technique reputed to kill using seemingly less than lethal force targeted at specific areas of the body.

(Link from wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Touch_of_DeathClaims of Practicability:

There have been a number of martial artists claiming to practice the technique in reality, beginning in the 1960s, when the term was advertised alongside the English translation "The Death Touch" by American eccentric Count Dante.

In 1985, an article in Black Belt magazine speculated that the death of Bruce Lee, in 1973, might have been caused by "a delayed reaction to a Dim-Mak strike he received several weeks prior to his collapse". Other authors, as well, have said the death of Bruce Lee may have been due to a "Quivering Palm technique"[3] (alongside an article about Cai li fo instructor Wong Doc-Fai) to the effect that "dim mak does actually exist and is still taught to a few select kung fu practitioners."[4] A 1986 book on qi identifies dim mak as "one of the secret specialities" of wing chun.[5]

In ca. 1990, Taika Seiyu Oyata founded the style of Ryū-te which involves "pressure point fighting" (Kyūshojutsu). In the 1990s, karate instructor George Dillman developed a style that involves kyūshojutsu, a term that he identifies with Dim-Mak. Dillman eventually went as far as claiming to have developed qi-based attacks that work without physical contact ("no-touch knockout" techniques), a claim that did not stand up to third-party investigation and was consequently denounced as fraudulent.[6]

Also, during the late 1980s, Erle Montaigue (1949-2011[7]) published a number of books and instruction videos on Dim Mak with Paladin Press. Montaigue claims to be "the first Westerner to be granted the degree of 'Master' in taijiquan", awarded by Master Wang Xin-Wu in 1985. According to Montaigue's own account, Dim-Mak is an aspect of traditional old Yang style Taji Quan which he claims he began learning in 1978 from a master called Chiang Yiu-chun. Montaigue stated this man was an illegal immigrant, making his existence difficult to verify. Erle subsequently learned the remaining "qi disruptive" forms of Wudang Shan from Liang Shih-kan in 1995.[8] Paladin Press has other titles on the topic of Dim Mak, including Kelly (2001) and Walker and Bauer (2002), both with a foreword by Montaigue.

Tai Chi

Krav Maga

And learn how to throw Shuriken.

#44 Posted by Pyrogram (39502 posts) - - Show Bio

I'm interested in Silat Gayong or Muay Thai... both are really freaking interesting. Wing Chun is cool and all, but i've never really seen any kicking 'game' involved, do correct me if i'm wrong.

Kicking in real life is pointless anyways.

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#45 Posted by GraniteSoldier (7979 posts) - - Show Bio

I've actually achieved master rank in Tae Kwon Do, but I would really loved to master Krav Maga. The efficient brutality of it is beautiful.

#46 Posted by Bruxae (13984 posts) - - Show Bio

Wing Chun, Escrima or just plain old Kung Fu perhaps.

#47 Posted by ssejllenrad (12847 posts) - - Show Bio

Already a black belt in kyokushin and around 2nd Dan (lakan) in Kali. So yeah, being a master in those arts would be great. And no, being a black belt doesn't give you the right to call yourself 'master'.

#48 Edited by ShootingNova (17834 posts) - - Show Bio

I do have some martial arts skill but Ninjutsu sounds like fun, though it'd be quite taxing on my time, and on me....

I think I could do skills 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 10, 11, 14, 16, 17 and 18 (mainly because I can do some of these thanks to prior martial art training). I'm not exactly sure how to accomplish skill 1 because well, it can be a bit broad, but it's plausible that I could succeed. I'm also not fully sure what some of the other skills are.

I also did a bit of fencing (I know its more of a sport than a martial art) but the rules seem a little restrictive, I mean, its refreshing but maybe its a bit different from the less limited martial arts I'm used to.

Kendo seems interesting but it seems a little bit like fencing. And I also don't like shouting whenever I attack.

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#49 Edited by CaptainUzi (1679 posts) - - Show Bio
@deadite said:

Dim Mak, the touch of death. Don't know if it's real or if it's practical enough in real combat, but if it's real, I would like to learn how to use it.

The Touch of Death (or Death-Point Striking) refers to any martial arts technique reputed to kill using seemingly less than lethal force targeted at specific areas of the body.

(Link from wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Touch_of_DeathClaims of Practicability:

There have been a number of martial artists claiming to practice the technique in reality, beginning in the 1960s, when the term was advertised alongside the English translation "The Death Touch" by American eccentric Count Dante.

In 1985, an article in Black Belt magazine speculated that the death of Bruce Lee, in 1973, might have been caused by "a delayed reaction to a Dim-Mak strike he received several weeks prior to his collapse". Other authors, as well, have said the death of Bruce Lee may have been due to a "Quivering Palm technique"[3] (alongside an article about Cai li fo instructor Wong Doc-Fai) to the effect that "dim mak does actually exist and is still taught to a few select kung fu practitioners."[4] A 1986 book on qi identifies dim mak as "one of the secret specialities" of wing chun.[5]

In ca. 1990, Taika Seiyu Oyata founded the style of Ryū-te which involves "pressure point fighting" (Kyūshojutsu). In the 1990s, karate instructor George Dillman developed a style that involves kyūshojutsu, a term that he identifies with Dim-Mak. Dillman eventually went as far as claiming to have developed qi-based attacks that work without physical contact ("no-touch knockout" techniques), a claim that did not stand up to third-party investigation and was consequently denounced as fraudulent.[6]

Also, during the late 1980s, Erle Montaigue (1949-2011[7]) published a number of books and instruction videos on Dim Mak with Paladin Press. Montaigue claims to be "the first Westerner to be granted the degree of 'Master' in taijiquan", awarded by Master Wang Xin-Wu in 1985. According to Montaigue's own account, Dim-Mak is an aspect of traditional old Yang style Taji Quan which he claims he began learning in 1978 from a master called Chiang Yiu-chun. Montaigue stated this man was an illegal immigrant, making his existence difficult to verify. Erle subsequently learned the remaining "qi disruptive" forms of Wudang Shan from Liang Shih-kan in 1995.[8] Paladin Press has other titles on the topic of Dim Mak, including Kelly (2001) and Walker and Bauer (2002), both with a foreword by Montaigue.

Tai Chi

Krav Maga

And learn how to throw Shuriken.

Now you've earned yourself a fist bump!
From what I've been told and read about myself, the dim mak does exist. But I've never seen it. I know that no one could really differentiate it from a regular punch. I've never been taught the technique because my sifu did not know it. Or at least he claimed not to, and just didn't teach me it.

Shurikan are actually easy to throw.

Start with the knives, about 9" long and from about 10-12 feet away, do a quick flick of your of wrist with the blade loosely sitting between your thumb and index. And make sure your do a quick flick. You should make it stick right in.

The shurikan is essentially the same thing, just held by the knuckle as opposed to the finger tips.

#50 Edited by Deadite (24209 posts) - - Show Bio

@captainuzi said:
@deadite said:

Dim Mak, the touch of death. Don't know if it's real or if it's practical enough in real combat, but if it's real, I would like to learn how to use it.

The Touch of Death (or Death-Point Striking) refers to any martial arts technique reputed to kill using seemingly less than lethal force targeted at specific areas of the body.

(Link from wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Touch_of_DeathClaims of Practicability:

There have been a number of martial artists claiming to practice the technique in reality, beginning in the 1960s, when the term was advertised alongside the English translation "The Death Touch" by American eccentric Count Dante.

In 1985, an article in Black Belt magazine speculated that the death of Bruce Lee, in 1973, might have been caused by "a delayed reaction to a Dim-Mak strike he received several weeks prior to his collapse". Other authors, as well, have said the death of Bruce Lee may have been due to a "Quivering Palm technique"[3] (alongside an article about Cai li fo instructor Wong Doc-Fai) to the effect that "dim mak does actually exist and is still taught to a few select kung fu practitioners."[4] A 1986 book on qi identifies dim mak as "one of the secret specialities" of wing chun.[5]

In ca. 1990, Taika Seiyu Oyata founded the style of Ryū-te which involves "pressure point fighting" (Kyūshojutsu). In the 1990s, karate instructor George Dillman developed a style that involves kyūshojutsu, a term that he identifies with Dim-Mak. Dillman eventually went as far as claiming to have developed qi-based attacks that work without physical contact ("no-touch knockout" techniques), a claim that did not stand up to third-party investigation and was consequently denounced as fraudulent.[6]

Also, during the late 1980s, Erle Montaigue (1949-2011[7]) published a number of books and instruction videos on Dim Mak with Paladin Press. Montaigue claims to be "the first Westerner to be granted the degree of 'Master' in taijiquan", awarded by Master Wang Xin-Wu in 1985. According to Montaigue's own account, Dim-Mak is an aspect of traditional old Yang style Taji Quan which he claims he began learning in 1978 from a master called Chiang Yiu-chun. Montaigue stated this man was an illegal immigrant, making his existence difficult to verify. Erle subsequently learned the remaining "qi disruptive" forms of Wudang Shan from Liang Shih-kan in 1995.[8] Paladin Press has other titles on the topic of Dim Mak, including Kelly (2001) and Walker and Bauer (2002), both with a foreword by Montaigue.

Tai Chi

Krav Maga

And learn how to throw Shuriken.

Now you've earned yourself a fist bump!

From what I've been told and read about myself, the dim mak does exist. But I've never seen it. I know that no one could really differentiate it from a regular punch. I've never been taught the technique because my sifu did not know it. Or at least he claimed not to, and just didn't teach me it.

Shurikan are actually easy to throw.

Start with the knives, about 9" long and from about 10-12 feet away, do a quick flick of your of wrist with the blade loosely sitting between your thumb and index. And make sure your do a quick flick. You should make it stick right in.

The shurikan is essentially the same thing, just held by the knuckle as opposed to the finger tips.

I forgot to add Wing Chun to my list. If the moves are the same as the ones that's used in IP Man then I'm interested.

Wow, didn't know you actually practice martial art, and you know how to throw Shurikan, that's amazing :)

Fist-bump accepted!!

I heard from somewhere that it's best to keep it as a secret if you have actually learned something like Dim Mak. It's like giving another tool for the opposing attorney to use to bring doubts to the jury, when you're a suspect or whatever.