#151 Posted by Illuminatus (9509 posts) - - Show Bio

@willpayton: On the glass rain, I believe it would actually be liquid glass, as the planet's proximity to the sun would most likely create a set of circumstances too hot for glass to remain in a solid, or even semi-solid state.

Still, it is interesting though, and the first planet we've identified and viewed by it's natural color (azure blue).

#152 Posted by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio

@willpayton: On the glass rain, I believe it would actually be liquid glass, as the planet's proximity to the sun would most likely create a set of circumstances too hot for glass to remain in a solid, or even semi-solid state.

Still, it is interesting though, and the first planet we've identified and viewed by it's natural color (azure blue).

Yeah, that's true, it would be in liquid form. My mistake to say "pieces of glass". More like "drops of glass". =)

What I'm really waiting for is when we'll be able to directly image Earth-sized planets. So far I think we've directly imaged (actually seen light coming from the planet) only a handful of very large ones... larger than Jupiter. That's nice, but those are gas giants, with little to no hope of life.

What's useful about directly imaging planets as opposed to other methods is that we'll be able to use spectrometers to figure out what elements are in the atmosphere of the planet. This can give us clues as to whether there's life there... for example if we find oxygen in the atmosphere.

We dont be able to actually get "images" of the planets... i.e. with clouds and landmasses and all that. I dont think that's even theoretically possible, given how little light we see from that far away. But, getting any light at all from an Earth-sized planet would be an achievement, even as close as 20 light years (basically our back yard).

#153 Posted by turoksonofstone (13199 posts) - - Show Bio

Mars Earth Surface Map Comparison

#154 Posted by lykopis (10746 posts) - - Show Bio

Want to know what makes up a kilogram? How about what the roundest thing on Earth is?

Watch this.

I loved this this first time I saw it -- even better the second. How I would LOVE to hold that!

#155 Posted by Glitch_Spawn (17132 posts) - - Show Bio

The bible clearly voide all science. Bunch of heresy right here.

#156 Posted by consolemaster001 (5670 posts) - - Show Bio

@glitch_spawn: This thread is about science not religion. Anyways did you hear that oxygen and magnezium are back together ? OMg

#157 Posted by Glitch_Spawn (17132 posts) - - Show Bio

@glitch_spawn: This thread is about science not religion. Anyways did you hear that oxygen and magnezium are back together ? OMg

I already tpld you man!

#158 Posted by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio

@lykopis said:

@willpayton said:

Want to know what makes up a kilogram? How about what the roundest thing on Earth is?

Watch this.

I loved this this first time I saw it -- even better the second. How I would LOVE to hold that!

I'm with you 100%, I would love to get the chance to hold that amazing object in my hand. I bet it doesnt feel like anything else.

It makes me think of when we excavate the ruins of ancient civilizations and try to determine their tech level by the artifacts we find. Imagine that our civilization disappears and in 1000 years some aliens land and want to know how technologically advanced we were. If they find this still intact they would have a good clue... even if by then almost everything else made of metal and concrete has been destroyed.

#159 Posted by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio

Graphene is a material that's 100x stronger than steel, and you probably have some lying around at home.

Want to know more? Well, here you go.

#160 Edited by DocStrange (152 posts) - - Show Bio

Yow, these are some pretty complex concepts. I'm glad they dumbed it down for us; I doubt my attention span could handle much more. Any idea where the guy is from? Hir spoken inflection is interesting, especially with words like recess and concept (plus he's kinda cute). Thank you for sharing these vids with us.

#161 Posted by youmessinwithme (1189 posts) - - Show Bio

Namor and Aquaman should both die every time they try to visit the Surface because of the massive difference in pressure :P

#162 Posted by Pyrogram (39547 posts) - - Show Bio

This thread is fun.

#163 Posted by lykopis (10746 posts) - - Show Bio

Ha, that's awesome. This is how science should be introduced. Gets the curiosity flowing.

#164 Posted by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio

@docstrange said:

Yow, these are some pretty complex concepts. I'm glad they dumbed it down for us; I doubt my attention span could handle much more. Any idea where the guy is from? Hir spoken inflection is interesting, especially with words like recess and concept (plus he's kinda cute). Thank you for sharing these vids with us.

His name is Derek Muller. You can find out more about him in this interview. He has a background in physics, but he now does mainly filmmaking and education.

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/psi-vid/2012/03/15/meet-derek-mueller-winner-of-the-cyberscreen-science-film-festival/

You guys should also check out his YouTube channel, he has a lot of very neat stuff and fun videos!

http://www.youtube.com/user/1veritasium/videos

Here's an interesting TED talk he gave about how to teach physics... it's actually very interesting:

BTW if you guys have questions or want to know more about some of these subjects that come up on this thread, feel free to ask about it. For those who dont know, my background is in physics/astronomy, so I might be able to give you some answers or at least point you in the right direction.

And thanks everyone for continuing to post here and keep the thread alive. Heheh... I cant do it by myself cause of that pesky 2-consecutive-post limit. =)

#165 Posted by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio
#166 Posted by CyborgZod (149 posts) - - Show Bio

That's pretty damn cool

#167 Edited by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio

Boeing shows off it's new spaceship, under development. The shape is inspired by the Apollo command modules, but it's bigger. Of course it has all new tech, will be pretty much automated, but will still allow the crew to take over if needed. It has physical buttons and switches, but only for backup since it will be controlled by touch-screens. They might also be using iPads (or other tablet devices) eventually. =)

Read more about it here:

http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/07/ars-hops-in-boeings-commercial-space-spaceship-the-cst-100/

#168 Posted by Hypnosis (350 posts) - - Show Bio

@willpayton: I got a comic physics vs real world physics kind of question. Can you explain how light manipulators such as Dazzler or Dr Light are able to generate light blasts that can burn a hole through steel? Do photons contain heat, mass or anything like that? I have no idea. A dumb down version would be nice since I have never taken physics in my life lol.

#169 Posted by dngn4774 (3189 posts) - - Show Bio

Whoever can explain the speed force in a logical manner to DC fans should get a noble prize.

#170 Edited by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio

@hypnosis said:

@willpayton: I got a comic physics vs real world physics kind of question. Can you explain how light manipulators such as Dazzler or Dr Light are able to generate light blasts that can burn a hole through steel? Do photons contain heat, mass or anything like that? I have no idea. A dumb down version would be nice since I have never taken physics in my life lol.

Sure, I'm happy to answer this. So, assuming they're able to generate the light through some unknown process, it's totally possible that it could burn holes in steel and many other substances. We currently have lasers that can do this, and the military is developing very powerful ones to put on airplanes and naval ships.

As far as how it works, I'll start off with a quick explanation about light. As far as we know light is made up of small bits of energy. These are called photons, or sometimes quanta of energy. These photons move at a certain constant speed (the speed of light), have 0 mass, and sometimes behave like particles, and sometimes like waves. Another interesting thing about photons is that even though they dont have mass, they do carry momentum. What that means is simply that when a photon hits a particle with mass, it can "push" the particle in the other direction.

The fact that photons have momentum can be useful. Have you heard of a type of spaceship that uses something called a solar sail? It's kind of like a normal sail on a ship, but it gets pushed along by photons of light hitting it... usually from the Sun, or sometimes if you shine a powerful laser on it.

But, ok, on to why light can heat up things... the simple explanation is that when light energy hits an object, if the object is opaque, then the light basically goes into it and doesnt go back out. The photons hit the atoms inside the object and are either absorbed, or bounce off. Sometimes the photons knock electrons off of atoms. That's called ionization. But the main thing is that the energy of the photons gets absorbed by the material and it's turned into vibrational energy (kinetic energy) of the atoms. The photon disappears, but it's energy must be preserved... so it turns into kinetic energy for whatever atom it hits. So, the atoms start moving around faster. And, when the atoms of an object move faster, that's the same thing as the object heating up. That's basically it. If the object is more transparent, then it's much more difficult for the light to heat it up. If it's light colored, then a lot of light is reflected, so it's also hard to heat it up. If it's pure black, then it's easy, because it means the object is absorbing a lot of light energy.

In everyday terms, it means that on a sunny day you can stay cooler by wearing a white shirt. =)

@dngn4774 said:

Whoever can explain the speed force in a logical manner to DC fans should get a noble prize.

LOL... the Speed Force is basically magic. It totally violates the laws of physics. You can pretty much disregard physics when it comes to anything that Flash does.

#171 Posted by Jnr6Lil (7708 posts) - - Show Bio

This is a good thread.

Just we need no mention of religion. Religion discussed on the internet doesn't end up well.

#172 Edited by dngn4774 (3189 posts) - - Show Bio

@jnr6lil said:

This is a good thread.

Just we need no mention of religion. Religion discussed on the internet doesn't end up well.

That's almost a scientific fact.

#173 Edited by Agent9149 (2894 posts) - - Show Bio

When will scientists finally be able to successfully remove the nuclei of a sperm cell and inject it into a egg cell. Then fertilize that egg with another sperm cell to create a child with same-sex parents?

#174 Edited by Hypnosis (350 posts) - - Show Bio

@willpayton: Wow that was a perfect explanation. Thank you!

#175 Posted by lykopis (10746 posts) - - Show Bio

When will scientists finally be able to successfully remove the nuclei of a sperm cell and inject it into a egg cell. Then fertilize that egg with another sperm cell to create a child with same-sex parents?

What are you asking about? In Vitro Fertilization?

#176 Edited by IronMan1234 (248 posts) - - Show Bio

Here's a pic of Earth from Saturn's orbit. This is just a bit of the vastness of space. It truly is amazing when you stop to think how minuscule we really are.

Here's another pic for some perspective

http://imgur.com/z0QC98x

#177 Posted by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio

You guys heard of ferrofluids? It's a type of fluid make of some kind of oil with metal particles in it that make it react to magnetic fields. The result... you can make the fluid do really neat things.

#178 Edited by DocStrange (152 posts) - - Show Bio

@agent9149: When will scientists finally be able to successfully remove the nuclei of a sperm cell and inject it into a egg cell. Then fertilize that egg with another sperm cell to create a child with same-sex parents?

No. No, the genetic material of the spermatozoa divides into a single helix and fuses with half of the genetic material of the ova in the process of fertilization. Same sex parentage would require scientists to fuse the genes from two genetically diverse spermatozoan or two ovum and implant the resulting embryo in either a nutrient filled petrie dish or, perhaps more practically, another ova rendered devoid of its genetic materials, and then a willing uterus. Yeah, good luck getting authorization from the ethical bodies for that experiment!

#179 Posted by novi_homines (1338 posts) - - Show Bio
#180 Posted by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio

There may be another planet in our solar system that we're not aware of...

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/02/14/tyche-hidden-planet_n_823028.html

According to this, some astronomers think there may be a gas giant, bigger than Jupiter, in our solar system and we havent seen it. Why? Because it's really far away from the Sun.

My take on this... dont put any money on it. =) A large planet like this, that far from the Sun, could really only get there in one way... it'd have to have originally been formed in another solar system and then somehow ended up floating free, and then captured by our Sun. I think that's very, very unlikely. That's my expert opinion. =)

#181 Posted by Jonny_Anonymous (33637 posts) - - Show Bio

@willpayton: I find the idea that there is super-massive suns and planets hurtling through space at millions of miles an hour and not actually orbiting anything truly horrifying and utterly fascinating.

On another note has anybody read a Brief History of Time?

#182 Posted by ccraft (5312 posts) - - Show Bio

@novi_homines: What was amazing? I haven't been on this thread in awhile, glad to see its back alive :P

#183 Posted by novi_homines (1338 posts) - - Show Bio

@ccraft said:

@novi_homines: What was amazing? I haven't been on this thread in awhile, glad to see its back alive :P

lol true, should've specified. the sphinx video. =D

#184 Posted by _Cerberus_ (3448 posts) - - Show Bio

Can the OP please edit the OP and put this in the OP

#185 Posted by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio

@jonny_anonymous said:

@willpayton: I find the idea that there is super-massive suns and planets hurtling through space at millions of miles an hour and not actually orbiting anything truly horrifying and utterly fascinating.

On another note has anybody read a Brief History of Time?

Well, in this case you wouldnt have to worry about that. The planet they're talking about is orbiting the Sun like we are, it's just at a much further out orbit near the Oort Cloud.

Can the OP please edit the OP and put this in the OP

LOL... thanks for the suggestion. I really cant argue with the math in that pic. :-P

#186 Posted by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio
#187 Posted by ccraft (5312 posts) - - Show Bio

@novi_homines: Oh, the Mystery of the Sphinx? Yeah I really liked that documentary. But some of the details are lost to me. because I haven't watched in a such a long time. I think they might find more evidence that Mars could have supported life. Maybe around 50 or 100 years from now :P

It really opens your mind and makes you think, could it be true? I think it would be cool to find evidence of a more ancient civilization.

Ok guys, check this out. It's really, really cool.

http://htwins.net/scale2/?bordercolor=white

I seen that before, my older brother shown it to me awhile back. It's pretty cool!

#188 Edited by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio

Watch the Space Shuttle take off from the viewpoint of the shuttle, followed by the re-entry of the solid rocket boosters (SRBs) until they hit the ocean.

#189 Posted by CyborgZod (149 posts) - - Show Bio
#190 Posted by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio

Have you wondered if we live in one of an infinite number of universes?

This video discusses some of the options for multiple universes. Check it out.

#191 Edited by ShootingNova (17859 posts) - - Show Bio

@willpayton: There's a thread out there for parallel universes. Its not proven, but definitely not refuted.

There's theories suggesting that the universe is the inside of a black hole.

I wonder what people think of white holes?

#192 Posted by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio

@willpayton: There's a thread out there for parallel universes. Its not proven, but definitely not refuted.

There's theories suggesting that the universe is the inside of a black hole.

I wonder what people think of white holes?

I'm not really familiar with White Holes. As far as I know we dont have any evidence that they exist. Seems to me that if they did exist we'd have seen them by now.

#193 Posted by ShootingNova (17859 posts) - - Show Bio

@willpayton: True, but white holes are clearly consistent with physics. We used to think black holes didn't exist either.

Perhaps why we haven't seen white holes are because they are unstable. They collapse into black holes.

#194 Edited by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio

What if the Death Star was real? How much energy does it actually need to blow up the Earth? These, and other important questions are answered... here:

#195 Posted by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio
#196 Edited by lykopis (10746 posts) - - Show Bio

@willpayton:

A few trillion years to power the Death Star if every power station on Earth was used, lol. Hypermatter - just the idea of it is so cool -- how I wish it were real -- I can't even fathom having to remove mass equal to the size of Mount Everest with every "hit"!

The gentleman was so genuine in his enthusiasm in explaining how a Death Star could be conceivable = it was his energy which made the video most enjoyable for me -- very droll and very brilliant and very adorable, that physicist is. ;p

(oh -- and my eyes just welled up with tears watching the Space Shuttle race upward to space and its rockets returning back onto Earth. Sometimes, I just can't comprehend the sheer magnitude of what humankind has accomplished in such a short period of time.)

I love this thread.

:)

#197 Posted by WillPayton (9504 posts) - - Show Bio

@lykopis said:

I love this thread.

:)

Thank you! =)

@lykopis said:

@willpayton:

A few trillion years to power the Death Star if every power station on Earth was used, lol. Hypermatter - just the idea of it is so cool -- how I wish it were real -- I can't even fathom having to remove mass equal to the size of Mount Everest with every "hit"!

The gentleman was so genuine in his enthusiasm in explaining how a Death Star could be conceivable = it was his energy which made the video most enjoyable for me -- very droll and very brilliant and very adorable, that physicist is. ;p

BTW, I was curious about how much material it would take to build a Death Star, and whether we have that much metal around. I tried to find a site about the mass, and saw estimates that it might take around 1x10^15 tonnes of steel to build one. Then I looked up how much steel gets produced each year, which is about 1.4x10^9 tonnes/year.

Time to produce enough steel = 1 x 10^15 tonnes / 1.4 x 10^9 tonnes/year = 714,286 years

Or, lets say we just want to scrap some Nimitz class supercarriers (each ~100,000 tonnes) and use the metal. In that case, we'd need about 10 Billion Nimitz carriers for enough metal to build 1 Death Star.

#198 Posted by lykopis (10746 posts) - - Show Bio

@lykopis said:

I love this thread.

:)

Thank you! =)

@lykopis said:

@willpayton:

A few trillion years to power the Death Star if every power station on Earth was used, lol. Hypermatter - just the idea of it is so cool -- how I wish it were real -- I can't even fathom having to remove mass equal to the size of Mount Everest with every "hit"!

The gentleman was so genuine in his enthusiasm in explaining how a Death Star could be conceivable = it was his energy which made the video most enjoyable for me -- very droll and very brilliant and very adorable, that physicist is. ;p

BTW, I was curious about how much material it would take to build a Death Star, and whether we have that much metal around. I tried to find a site about the mass, and saw estimates that it might take around 1x10^15 tonnes of steel to build one. Then I looked up how much steel gets produced each year, which is about 1.4x10^9 tonnes/year.

Time to produce enough steel = 1 x 10^15 tonnes / 1.4 x 10^9 tonnes/year = 714,286 years

Or, lets say we just want to scrap some Nimitz class supercarriers (each ~100,000 tonnes) and use the metal. In that case, we'd need about 10 Billion Nimitz carriers for enough metal to build 1 Death Star.

Oh wow -- nice addition numbers wise to the video! You should add that to the comments on YT (if you haven't done so already).

#199 Posted by INLIFE (1600 posts) - - Show Bio

#200 Posted by russellmania77 (15527 posts) - - Show Bio

idk what science is :'(((((((((((((((((((