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#1 Edited by superstay (10255 posts) - - Show Bio

I Don't know if their is a thread like this already existing, but I decided to make one.

I'm a very big fan of mythologies, from Greek, to Navajo, to Egyptian, ect....I love mythology. So, what's your thoughts on mythology, what's your favorite...if you have one?

d?_?b

#2 Posted by Crom-Cruach (8901 posts) - - Show Bio

I can't say I have a favorite per say, but the one thing that I learned that was the most important was context and why comparison between two seemingly similar instances is often moot.

#3 Posted by superstay (10255 posts) - - Show Bio

@Crom-Cruach:

What mythologies do you know of

d?_?b

#4 Posted by FalconPuuunch (942 posts) - - Show Bio

I'm not sure if it's classified under "mythology" but my favorite epic poem is The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri. Second place goes to The Iliad.

#5 Posted by Crom-Cruach (8901 posts) - - Show Bio

@superstay said:

@Crom-Cruach:

What mythologies do you know of

Well I have had courses on mythology and subscribe to several magazines. So to name a few of those I've studied so far (no claims of being an expert thought)

Greco-Roman, norse, irish celtic, welsh, aztec, inca, maya, judaic, christian, islamic, sumero-babylonian, caananite, algonquin, iroquois, haida, japanese, hindu, chinese, zoroastrian, mongol, slavic, polynesian, australian.

#6 Posted by superstay (10255 posts) - - Show Bio

@Crom-Cruach:

No Egyptian

d?_?b d~_~b

#7 Posted by Crom-Cruach (8901 posts) - - Show Bio

@superstay said:

No Egyptian

yes also Egyptian, as I said the list is not complete.

#8 Posted by Blood1991 (8098 posts) - - Show Bio

Greek is the only Mythology I have really explored in depth, but I've been looking a bit into Norse and Egyptian.

#9 Posted by superstay (10255 posts) - - Show Bio

@FalconPuuunch: Well if you consider christianity to be a mythology then yes it counts as a addition to it

@Blood1991: Thats how I got into mythologies too, Greek and Egyptian then Norse

d^¡^b

#10 Posted by salamatsabi (216 posts) - - Show Bio

I love mythology but not an expert of it I found this list particularly pleasing

http://listverse.com/2010/09/09/top-10-worst-theological-or-mythological-demons/

here is a sample

Agares

Origin: Christian demonology

Also known as: Agreas

This male demon makes “those who run stand still”, a terrible thing to be a victim of during, say, a tornado. He is also said to be one of the demons that controls earthquakes. Agares also teaches many languages, focusing on the profanities and ethnic slurs. He is also believed to be the ruler of the eastern zone of Hell, and he is said to have 31 legions of demons at his command. He is also one of the–if not the–strangest looking demon on this list. He is often portrayed as a pale elderly man riding a crocodile, with a hawk either attached to or on his fist. No joke!

Aka Manah

Origin: Zoroastrian mythology

Also known as: Akem Manah, Akoman, Akvan

His name means “manah made evil”; in this case, the word “manah” represents “the mind”. Many refer to him as the demon of “evil intention”, “evil mind”, “evil purpose”, or “evil thinking”. His job: To prevent people from fulfilling their moral duties (.i.e.: being a good parent, saving a life, etc.).

Ala

Origin: Pre-Slovic and Slovic mythology, and Christian demonology

Also known as: plural: Ale

Ale are some of the few demons on this list who does evil deeds, but can be persuaded to do good deeds, and can even help you! They particularly like creating bad weather (most notably, hail- and thunder-storms) over farms, orchards, and vineyards, in order to destroy crops. They also are said to like eating children. Ale are so hungry, that they are said to be able to “eat the sun and/or moon”, creating eclipses. They can pose a great threat to a persons’ mental and physical life; they can even possess you. However, if you approach an Ala with trust and respect, she and the other Ale will save your life whenever necessary, and make you rich! Ale are also very afraid of eagles…just in case you don’t want to become friends with one. What they look like changes with each account; some say they look like ravens, others like clouds or dark winds; many say snakes or female dragons. They are believed to live in lakes, springs, clouds, unreachable mountains, forests, caves, or gigantic trees.

Asag

Origin: Sumerian mythology

Asag is one of many demons that causes sickness. “But what,”, you say, “separates him from other demons that cause sickness?”. Well, for one, he had sex with all the mountains in the world, and had a litter of “rock-demon” offspring that defends him in any battle. He is also believed to be so grotesquely, unbelievably ugly, that his very presence causes fish to be boiled alive in rivers and/or lakes within viewing-distance!

Belphegor

Origin: Christian demonology and Kabbalic mythology

Belphegor is absolutely unbelievable. He got his start in Assyria, many, many years ago. He was first called Baal-Peor, and he was associated with orgies, and other types of lewdness. The Israelites worshiped him, in the form of a phallic (penis-shaped) idol. Later on, in Kabbalic mythology, he was a demon who made people paranoid of each other, and who would seduce them with money and overall wealth. Needless to say, it was hard to summon Baal-Peor, because he required the sacrifice of human excrement! In the 16th Century, he changed his name to Belphegor, and changed his strategy (somewhat). He pretty much threw away the idea of causing mutual mistrust in people, and instead…focused on inventions. He would “suggest” crazy (yet plausible) inventions to people, and then use their greed to his (and their) advantage when they became successful. According to legend, Belphegor was sent to Earth from Hell to either justify of disprove the rumors that marriage can result in happiness. Finding no evidence that happiness is possible in a marriage (now, there’s a surprise), he chose to stay on Earth. He is notable for two bizarre attributes: He is believed to be physically, mentally, and strategically strongest in the month of April, and he either was or is Hell’s/Satan’s ambassador to France. Belphegor also played an role in Milton’s book, “Paradise Lost”. He is either depicted as a hideous, bearded demon with horns and claws, or a beautiful young woman.

Jikininki

Origin: Japanese Buddhist mythology

Jikininki are the spirits of selfish, greedy, or ungodly people who have passed on. They are said to be cursed to eat the flesh of human corpses. It is also said that they take valuables from the corpses, in order to bribe local law-enforcement officials to leave them alone. Unlike most demons, they actually hate what they are, and are in a constant state of self-disgust and self-loathing. Some accounts state that they are so terrifying to look at, that seeing one would make you paralyzed with fear. Other accounts indicate that Jikininki can take the form of normal human beings, and can even lead seemingly normal lives by day. They are notable in that–unlike other gaki or rakshasa (“hungry ghosts”), and ghosts in general–they are an endangered species, if one can use such a term in this context.

Pontianak

Origin: Indonesian mythology

Also known as: Kuntilanak, Matianak, or Boentianak

The Pontianak are the spirits of ladies who died during child-birth, and became undead. Pontianak are said to scare people (mostly men), and then rip out their internal organs for feeding with their claws. In the case of men that the Pontianak knew when they were alive (who abused, or otherwise betrayed them), they are said to remove the man’s genitalia with their bare hands (Ouch!!). They are much like vampires; however, they do what they do more out of vengeance, rather then necessity or sustenance. It’s also hard to judge just how far away from you they are; usually, a loud cry means the Pontianak is far away, whereas a soft cry signifies that the Pontianak is nearby. It is also said that a faint floral fragrance is detected upon first seeing it, however, the fragrance changes to something rotten after a short period of time. Pontianak are believed to live in banana trees, a possible phallic-/fertility-reference.

#11 Posted by Veitha (3362 posts) - - Show Bio

I like Greek and Norse mithology the most, but I like exploring and reading about many kind of mithologies.. Like Zoroastrian or Kabbalic mithology or also wicca or pagan mithology

#12 Posted by PrinceIMC (5422 posts) - - Show Bio

I love Greek mythology which is one reason I really like the Percy Jackson books. Interesting twists and modern interpretations of Greek myths.

#13 Posted by kuonphobos (4898 posts) - - Show Bio

@salamatsabi said:

I love mythology but not an expert of it I found this list particularly pleasing

http://listverse.com/2010/09/09/top-10-worst-theological-or-mythological-demons/

here is a sample

Agares

Origin: Christian demonology

Also known as: Agreas

This male demon makes “those who run stand still”, a terrible thing to be a victim of during, say, a tornado. He is also said to be one of the demons that controls earthquakes. Agares also teaches many languages, focusing on the profanities and ethnic slurs. He is also believed to be the ruler of the eastern zone of Hell, and he is said to have 31 legions of demons at his command. He is also one of the–if not the–strangest looking demon on this list. He is often portrayed as a pale elderly man riding a crocodile, with a hawk either attached to or on his fist. No joke!

Aka Manah

Origin: Zoroastrian mythology

Also known as: Akem Manah, Akoman, Akvan

His name means “manah made evil”; in this case, the word “manah” represents “the mind”. Many refer to him as the demon of “evil intention”, “evil mind”, “evil purpose”, or “evil thinking”. His job: To prevent people from fulfilling their moral duties (.i.e.: being a good parent, saving a life, etc.).

Ala

Origin: Pre-Slovic and Slovic mythology, and Christian demonology

Also known as: plural: Ale

Ale are some of the few demons on this list who does evil deeds, but can be persuaded to do good deeds, and can even help you! They particularly like creating bad weather (most notably, hail- and thunder-storms) over farms, orchards, and vineyards, in order to destroy crops. They also are said to like eating children. Ale are so hungry, that they are said to be able to “eat the sun and/or moon”, creating eclipses. They can pose a great threat to a persons’ mental and physical life; they can even possess you. However, if you approach an Ala with trust and respect, she and the other Ale will save your life whenever necessary, and make you rich! Ale are also very afraid of eagles…just in case you don’t want to become friends with one. What they look like changes with each account; some say they look like ravens, others like clouds or dark winds; many say snakes or female dragons. They are believed to live in lakes, springs, clouds, unreachable mountains, forests, caves, or gigantic trees.

Asag

Origin: Sumerian mythology

Asag is one of many demons that causes sickness. “But what,”, you say, “separates him from other demons that cause sickness?”. Well, for one, he had sex with all the mountains in the world, and had a litter of “rock-demon” offspring that defends him in any battle. He is also believed to be so grotesquely, unbelievably ugly, that his very presence causes fish to be boiled alive in rivers and/or lakes within viewing-distance!

Belphegor

Origin: Christian demonology and Kabbalic mythology

Belphegor is absolutely unbelievable. He got his start in Assyria, many, many years ago. He was first called Baal-Peor, and he was associated with orgies, and other types of lewdness. The Israelites worshiped him, in the form of a phallic (penis-shaped) idol. Later on, in Kabbalic mythology, he was a demon who made people paranoid of each other, and who would seduce them with money and overall wealth. Needless to say, it was hard to summon Baal-Peor, because he required the sacrifice of human excrement! In the 16th Century, he changed his name to Belphegor, and changed his strategy (somewhat). He pretty much threw away the idea of causing mutual mistrust in people, and instead…focused on inventions. He would “suggest” crazy (yet plausible) inventions to people, and then use their greed to his (and their) advantage when they became successful. According to legend, Belphegor was sent to Earth from Hell to either justify of disprove the rumors that marriage can result in happiness. Finding no evidence that happiness is possible in a marriage (now, there’s a surprise), he chose to stay on Earth. He is notable for two bizarre attributes: He is believed to be physically, mentally, and strategically strongest in the month of April, and he either was or is Hell’s/Satan’s ambassador to France. Belphegor also played an role in Milton’s book, “Paradise Lost”. He is either depicted as a hideous, bearded demon with horns and claws, or a beautiful young woman.

Jikininki

Origin: Japanese Buddhist mythology

Jikininki are the spirits of selfish, greedy, or ungodly people who have passed on. They are said to be cursed to eat the flesh of human corpses. It is also said that they take valuables from the corpses, in order to bribe local law-enforcement officials to leave them alone. Unlike most demons, they actually hate what they are, and are in a constant state of self-disgust and self-loathing. Some accounts state that they are so terrifying to look at, that seeing one would make you paralyzed with fear. Other accounts indicate that Jikininki can take the form of normal human beings, and can even lead seemingly normal lives by day. They are notable in that–unlike other gaki or rakshasa (“hungry ghosts”), and ghosts in general–they are an endangered species, if one can use such a term in this context.

Pontianak

Origin: Indonesian mythology

Also known as: Kuntilanak, Matianak, or Boentianak

The Pontianak are the spirits of ladies who died during child-birth, and became undead. Pontianak are said to scare people (mostly men), and then rip out their internal organs for feeding with their claws. In the case of men that the Pontianak knew when they were alive (who abused, or otherwise betrayed them), they are said to remove the man’s genitalia with their bare hands (Ouch!!). They are much like vampires; however, they do what they do more out of vengeance, rather then necessity or sustenance. It’s also hard to judge just how far away from you they are; usually, a loud cry means the Pontianak is far away, whereas a soft cry signifies that the Pontianak is nearby. It is also said that a faint floral fragrance is detected upon first seeing it, however, the fragrance changes to something rotten after a short period of time. Pontianak are believed to live in banana trees, a possible phallic-/fertility-reference.

Much of this would be part of demonolgy which is a subset of mythology.

World mythology was one of my earliest loves as a child and remains so to this day.

#14 Posted by superstay (10255 posts) - - Show Bio

@kuonphobos: Yeah that's interesting, I also fell in love with mythology as a child. I loved how they're all very different in many ways yet the same. Their storys are awesome (and weird when you think about it), also a lot of those mythologies kind of fit in the same continuity.

@Veitha: @PrinceIMC: Yeah I love Greek Myth the most, Egyptian might be second, Navajo might be third

d^¡^b

#15 Posted by kuonphobos (4898 posts) - - Show Bio

@superstay:

I find that there are two very different paths one can take with world mythology.

First is a "comparative" school of thought which seeks to find similarities between various pantheons. James Frazier's The Golden Bough is the seminal example of this. Because of Frazier's influence on Western comparitive religion studies most western education takes this approach.

The second IMO is a more respectful study of each mythic cycle on it's own ground and based upon it's own merits. This requires a deeper study of the historical and cultural underpinnings of each pantheon. This type of study renders a much richer and more nuanced understanding of various mythological expressions.

#16 Posted by Dragonborn_CT (23300 posts) - - Show Bio

I like this thread :D

Online
#17 Posted by FalconPuuunch (942 posts) - - Show Bio

@superstay said:

@FalconPuuunch: Well if you consider christianity to be a mythology then yes it counts as a addition to it

@Blood1991: Thats how I got into mythologies too, Greek and Egyptian then Norse

d^¡^b

Well, I don't but the epic poem has a lot of references to Greek mythology. A lot of the stuff in there is not whats in the Christian bible.

#18 Posted by dccomicsrule2011 (25673 posts) - - Show Bio

I like Egyptian the best.

#19 Posted by superstay (10255 posts) - - Show Bio

@Dragonborn_CT: Thanks

@kuonphobos: Yeah that's why I understand Greek and Egyptian Myth so well, I studied their culture first.

@FalconPuuunch:

Yeah they did involve a lot of references to Greek Myth

do¡ob

#20 Posted by superstay (10255 posts) - - Show Bio

@dccomicsrule2011:

Who's your favorite god

d?_?b

#21 Posted by Captain_Yesterday (807 posts) - - Show Bio

I'm far from an expert, but I've always been a fan of Greek Mythology as well as their culture.

#22 Posted by RedQueen (1171 posts) - - Show Bio

Studied Greek and Roman mythology - so got to say those are my two favourites, though I have an interest Egyptian and Norse mythology as well. Plus, my middle name is Athena- I was influenced to study mythology and history from an early age. :)

#23 Posted by Nelomaxwell (10596 posts) - - Show Bio

Ifa Mythology West African from,  Nigeria. It's ancestral and is today the religion we call Vodun or Santeria.

#24 Posted by dccomicsrule2011 (25673 posts) - - Show Bio

@superstay said:

@dccomicsrule2011:

Who's your favorite god

d?_?b

Hmm it's a toss up between Osiris and Ra.

#25 Posted by StMichalofWilson (3953 posts) - - Show Bio

I'm sort of torn between Norse and Greek.

#26 Posted by ShootingNova (18423 posts) - - Show Bio

@superstay: Did I influence you to make this in any way?

Anyways, my expertise lies in Greek, Egyptian, Norse, Roman, Chinese/Taoist and possibly Hindu myths (although I hesitate to say so to the latter because I am not nearly as well-versed in Hinduism as the above). I also have quite some knowledge of Babylonian myths, and a fairly limited amount of knowledge on Aztec and Mayan mythologies.

#27 Posted by mrdecepticonleader (18454 posts) - - Show Bio

@ShootingNova said:

@superstay: Did I influence you to make this in any way?

Anyways, my expertise lies in Greek, Egyptian, Norse, Roman, Chinese/Taoist and possibly Hindu myths (although I hesitate to say so to the latter because I am not nearly as well-versed in Hinduism as the above). I also have quite some knowledge of Babylonian myths, and a fairly limited amount of knowledge on Aztec and Mayan mythologies.

Cool

Its true that many of the Roman gods were basically the Greek gods with different names.

Right?

#28 Posted by Matchstick (565 posts) - - Show Bio

Norse is generally my favorite, but Persian is growing on me.

#29 Posted by superstay (10255 posts) - - Show Bio

@mrdecepticonleader: Yes the Romans just took greek gods and gave them Roman names, I'll show u in another post

@ShootingNova: actually yeah

And I apologise for not answering you two sooner, I've been busy with this Writing Assignment I have

d~_~b

#30 Posted by superstay (10255 posts) - - Show Bio

@dccomicsrule2011: My favorite is Anubis than Ra

@mrdecepticonleader:

Greek = Roman

Aphrodite = Venus

Apollo = Apollo

Ares = Mars

Artemis = Diana

Athena = Minerva

Demeter = Ceres

Hades = Pluto

Hephaistos = Vulcan

Hera = Juno

Hermes = Mercury

Hestia = Vesta

Kronos = Saturn

Persephone = Proserpina

Poseidon = Neptune

Zeus = Jupiter

Eros = Cupid

Hercules = Heracles

d^L^b

#31 Edited by ShootingNova (18423 posts) - - Show Bio

@mrdecepticonleader: Yes. Refer to superstay's above post, but of course there is more (such as Nike = Victoria, Gaia/Gaea/Ge = Terra Mater, Oranos/Ouranos/Uranus = Caelus and so on).

@superstay said:

Hades = Pluto

Actually, "Pluto" was already mentioned in Greek myths as Plouton. Pluto was pretty much already from Greek but came into Roman religion and subsumed Dis Pater and Orcus.

Pluto is pretty much a later name for Hades (or Hades was an earlier name for Pluto, if that makes more sense). So I guess you could say Hades/Pluto = Pluto, or even Hades/Pluto = Pluto/Dis Pater/Orcus.

#32 Posted by kuonphobos (4898 posts) - - Show Bio

Just a thought:

Zeus = Deus

Deus Pater = Jupiter

I'm think along the lines of linguistic development here.

____________

An interesting theory worth exploring is the Indo-European (formerly called Aryan) roots to both Greek and Vedic (eventually becoming an element of Hinduism) culture and language.

#33 Edited by ShootingNova (18423 posts) - - Show Bio

@kuonphobos: "Deus" means "God". Deus refers to plenty of beings. Phanes was possibly "Deus", in other words, Phanes was possibly "God".

#34 Posted by ShootingNova (18423 posts) - - Show Bio

@kuonphobos said:

An interesting theory worth exploring is the Indo-European (formerly called Aryan) roots to both Greek and Vedic (eventually becoming an element of Hinduism) culture and language.

This does have some exploration already (for example, comparisons between Dyaus and Zeus).

Even stronger connections have been made between Greek and Hittie mythologies, so much that an entire table of them could be charted.

#35 Posted by kuonphobos (4898 posts) - - Show Bio

@ShootingNova said:

@kuonphobos: "Deus" means "God". Deus refers to plenty of beings. Phanes was possibly "Deus", in other words, Phanes was possibly "God".

I'm not sure that I would capitalize "god" here. It inevitably draws comparisons with the Hebrew concept. As you stated in Latin it simply means "god" which is why I included it with Pater in the etymology for Jupiter ie "the father god."

I find it interesting however that perhaps the word "deus" derived from Zeus which in turn may have derived from the Vedic Dyaus as you point out.

I wasn't aware of the Hittite element. I will look into that. There is also believe to be a connection between the Indo-European roots of both Vedic and Celtic cultures/languages as well with similarities in law codes between the proto-Irish and the Vedic cultures.

#36 Posted by ShootingNova (18423 posts) - - Show Bio

@kuonphobos: The book The Greek Myths: Gods, Monsters, Heroes and the Origins of Storytelling gives an entire table of Hittie and Greek events which share unnaturally common ground. I can post it later when I have time.

#37 Posted by kuonphobos (4898 posts) - - Show Bio

@ShootingNova said:

@kuonphobos: The book The Greek Myths: Gods, Monsters, Heroes and the Origins of Storytelling gives an entire table of Hittie and Greek events which share unnaturally common ground. I can post it later when I have time.

That would be cool. Or a link would also suffice. Thanks.

#38 Posted by ShootingNova (18423 posts) - - Show Bio

@kuonphobos: I am not sure I can give you a link to real life, but when I have time I might post that table up. Here or in a PM?

#39 Posted by kuonphobos (4898 posts) - - Show Bio

@ShootingNova: Here would be of benefit to others who might be interested.

I did just peruse a wiki article on Hittie religion/mythology and am now recalling things I learned years ago about that culture. Very interesting to me is the Queen Puduhepa who may have been one of the first recorded comparitive mythologists.

That link has a nice list of Hittite dieties but I would be very interested in a comparison with Greek cognates.Particularly one which took linguistic comparisons into account. For me an actual linguistic cognate establishes a much stronger connection than merely a conceptual one which can sometimes be watered down by the subjectivity of the scholar. Mythological studies in the West is mired by the presuppositions of persons such as Bullfinch, Frasier, Campbell and Hamilton. In my opinion of course.

#40 Posted by ShootingNova (18423 posts) - - Show Bio

@kuonphobos: Alright.

#41 Posted by ShootingNova (18423 posts) - - Show Bio

@superstay: justleader is inactive and kingkronos is not that active either, now, if you remember them.

How much more have you learnt in regards to mythology since the last time we were discussing it? I've learnt quite a lot.

#42 Posted by KingOfAsh (3621 posts) - - Show Bio

I'd say I find most myths and legends facinating

#43 Posted by lagoon_boy (10957 posts) - - Show Bio

Aren't the names of the days taken from Norse dwarfs?

#44 Posted by kuonphobos (4898 posts) - - Show Bio

@lagoon_boy said:

Aren't the names of the days taken from Norse dwarfs?

Monday = moon

Tuesday =Tyr

Wednesday = Wotan/Odin

Thursday = Thor

Friday = Frigga or Freyja

Saturday = Saturn

Sunday = duh?

Assuming you were referring to the common manes used in the West.

The Romans used some different names.

#45 Posted by ShootingNova (18423 posts) - - Show Bio

@kuonphobos: That is correct, although I think Baldr should have had a spot because he seemed more prominent than Tyr, but whatever.

#46 Posted by superstay (10255 posts) - - Show Bio

I love this thread already

@ShootingNova: Yeah it's alittle sad

I've been mostly leaning about heroes like Achilles, Hector, Atalanta, Samson, David ect.

But I'm still a newbie when it comes to mythology

@kuonphobos: Hey bro

@mrdecepticonleader: So do you like mythologies

d^L^b

#47 Posted by mrdecepticonleader (18454 posts) - - Show Bio

@superstay:Yes I like most mythology.I just don't know tons about it

#48 Posted by Nelomaxwell (10596 posts) - - Show Bio

I'm glad that Ifa/Vodoun Belief and myth is still practiced and celebrated all over the world. Although people tend to confuse it for witchcraft and satanism.

#49 Edited by superstay (10255 posts) - - Show Bio

@Nelomaxwell: d?_?b

@mrdecepticonleader:

who's your favorite god

d?_?b

#50 Posted by mrdecepticonleader (18454 posts) - - Show Bio

@superstay said:

@mrdecepticonleader:

who's your favorite god

d?_?b

I like Thor and Hades.