#1 Edited by Edamame (28294 posts) - - Show Bio
#2 Posted by TifaLockhart (14080 posts) - - Show Bio

I think it's sad that people place so much emphasis on ethnicity. We're all human.

#3 Edited by KnightRise (4785 posts) - - Show Bio

I don't want to get denied entry because I'm black. I don't want to be granted entry because I'm black.

#4 Posted by Edamame (28294 posts) - - Show Bio

I think it's sad that people place so much emphasis on ethnicity. We're all human.

Indeed. I completely agree.

I have always viewed "race" as a social construction. It is incredibly divisive, and it continues to create social strife.

#5 Posted by mrdecepticonleader (18414 posts) - - Show Bio
#6 Posted by ssejllenrad (12847 posts) - - Show Bio

Keep racism alive!!!

Asian stereotyping benefits me a lot!!! Nyahahahahahaha!

Seriously... Why can't we humans just get along and unite.. Cause the apes are coming whether you want it or not... And they don't give a sh*t about ethnicity.

#7 Posted by judasnixon (6667 posts) - - Show Bio

I'm conflicted on this..... Growing up southern I know racism is still running rampant, but I still don't think anyone should be treated any different for one's skin color for better or worse. Sometimes I feel like I'm overcompensting form white liberal, but after Hurricane Katrina where I lost my home, waiting at a gas station in mississippi for an hour and a half to get gas, I over heard some dumb redneck said " Those stupid niggers got what they had coming to them. I hope they all drown." I should of punched that man in the throat........

#8 Posted by Ciriel (410 posts) - - Show Bio

I live in the south, and it seems like my college does things like this, and sometimes I feel bad for them. They want to be soooo politically correct that they literally exhaust their scholarship resources sometimes...it's hard to explain.

#9 Posted by Jezer (3129 posts) - - Show Bio

I don't want to get denied entry because I'm black. I don't want to be granted entry because I'm black.

#10 Posted by KnightRise (4785 posts) - - Show Bio

@jezer: I'm not all the way sure how to respond. Race relations are complicated. I wish they didn't matter.

#11 Edited by Jezer (3129 posts) - - Show Bio

@knightrise said:

@jezer: I'm not all the way sure how to respond. Race relations are complicated. I wish they didn't matter.

We all wish they didn't. However, the reason race matters and is more than a "social construct" now is because it has been made a reality, primarily economically. I think anyone would agree that a giant chunk of the black population are in poor areas, some of which still have horrible school systems--maybe not being allowed to read and write for many decades had something to do with that. You know, being late to this whole idea of Education.

Saying "I don't want get denied entry or granted entry because I'm black." kinda ignores the idea that on a whole because blacks are being granted entry because they're black as a necessity because they were denied entry in the past. Environment/nurture has a big influence on the way you think, dream, and try to succeed in life. If blacks need an extra admissions privilege because the majority are in environments where they need such help to be brought out of, what's the issue?

Furthermore, when it comes to college admissions, they look at a host of factors--so its never about being granted entry "because I'm black", but because you volunteer alot, have great recommendations, wrote a brilliant essay etc. AND because you're black.

The last comment I will make before I exit this thread(because I definitely should not be debating on comicvine during Finals Week) is this: I've found that a significant portion of whites come to the conclusion that race is nothing more than a "social construct" and "shouldn't matter" because they don't realize they live in a state of privilege where race actually "doesn't matter". They are not constantly reminded of the fact that they're white because being white is such a norm, and so ubiquitious(this means everywhere right? lol) that there are few moments that make them self-conscious of that fact. When you walk into a room and happen to be the only person of your race in that room, and then people ghetto-up the way they talk when they're around you, all because race mattered in the past - then you can say that race doesn't matter in the present.

EDIT: Oh, and I think the blacks who say the same thing are most likely those who did not grow up in those areas. Or, who did, but were exceptions and rose above such environments. I can see why they'd say that, they were black and may be less self-conscious of how that has shaped their life due to their overriding individual characteristics or a different set of circumstances where race did not pull them down. Regardless, they should still be aware that their life experience is not as widespread and the vast majority are not like them. I fall into the first category and I am aware of such.

#12 Posted by Dabee (2399 posts) - - Show Bio

@jezer said:

That's amazingly done. lol

#13 Edited by KnightRise (4785 posts) - - Show Bio

@jezer said:

@knightrise said:

@jezer: I'm not all the way sure how to respond. Race relations are complicated. I wish they didn't matter.

We all wish they didn't. However, the reason race matters and is more than a "social construct" now is because it has been made a reality, primarily economically. I think anyone would agree that a giant chunk of the black population are in poor areas, some of which still have horrible school systems--maybe not being allowed to read and write for many decades had something to do with that. You know, being late to this whole idea of Education.

Saying "I don't want get denied entry or granted entry because I'm black." kinda ignores the idea that on a whole because blacks are being granted entry because they're black as a necessity because they were denied entry in the past. Environment/nurture has a big influence on the way you think, dream, and try to succeed in life. If blacks need an extra admissions privilege because the majority are in environments where they need such help to be brought out of, what's the issue?

Furthermore, when it comes to college admissions, they look at a host of factors--so its never about being granted entry "because I'm black", but because you volunteer alot, have great recommendations, wrote a brilliant essay etc. AND because you're black.

The last comment I will make before I exit this thread(because I definitely should not be debating on comicvine during Finals Week) is this: I've found that a significant portion of whites come to the conclusion that race is nothing more than a "social construct" and "shouldn't matter" because they don't realize they live in a state of privilege where race actually "doesn't matter". They are not constantly reminded of the fact that they're white because being white is such a norm, and so ubiquitious(this means everywhere right? lol) that there are few moments that make them self-conscious of that fact. When you walk into a room and happen to be the only person of your race in that room, and then people ghetto-up the way they talk when they're around you, all because race mattered in the past - then you can say that race doesn't matter in the present.

EDIT: Oh, and I think the blacks who say the same thing are most likely those who did not grow up in those areas. Or, who did, but were exceptions and rose above such environments. I can see why they'd say that, they were black and may be less self-conscious of how that has shaped their life due to their overriding individual characteristics or a different set of circumstances where race did not pull them down. Regardless, they should still be aware that their life experience is not as widespread and the vast majority are not like them. I fall into the first category and I am aware of such.

Very nicely put.

#14 Edited by ColonelRunAway (370 posts) - - Show Bio

@jezer said:

@knightrise said:

@jezer: I'm not all the way sure how to respond. Race relations are complicated. I wish they didn't matter.

We all wish they didn't. However, the reason race matters and is more than a "social construct" now is because it has been made a reality, primarily economically. I think anyone would agree that a giant chunk of the black population are in poor areas, some of which still have horrible school systems--maybe not being allowed to read and write for many decades had something to do with that. You know, being late to this whole idea of Education.

Saying "I don't want get denied entry or granted entry because I'm black." kinda ignores the idea that on a whole because blacks are being granted entry because they're black as a necessity because they were denied entry in the past. Environment/nurture has a big influence on the way you think, dream, and try to succeed in life. If blacks need an extra admissions privilege because the majority are in environments where they need such help to be brought out of, what's the issue?

Furthermore, when it comes to college admissions, they look at a host of factors--so its never about being granted entry "because I'm black", but because you volunteer alot, have great recommendations, wrote a brilliant essay etc. AND because you're black.

The last comment I will make before I exit this thread(because I definitely should not be debating on comicvine during Finals Week) is this: I've found that a significant portion of whites come to the conclusion that race is nothing more than a "social construct" and "shouldn't matter" because they don't realize they live in a state of privilege where race actually "doesn't matter". They are not constantly reminded of the fact that they're white because being white is such a norm, and so ubiquitious(this means everywhere right? lol) that there are few moments that make them self-conscious of that fact. When you walk into a room and happen to be the only person of your race in that room, and then people ghetto-up the way they talk when they're around you, all because race mattered in the past - then you can say that race doesn't matter in the present.

EDIT: Oh, and I think the blacks who say the same thing are most likely those who did not grow up in those areas. Or, who did, but were exceptions and rose above such environments. I can see why they'd say that, they were black and may be less self-conscious of how that has shaped their life due to their overriding individual characteristics or a different set of circumstances where race did not pull them down. Regardless, they should still be aware that their life experience is not as widespread and the vast majority are not like them. I fall into the first category and I am aware of such.

You're possibly the most competent person I've ever seen on this site.

#15 Posted by Jezer (3129 posts) - - Show Bio

SC is the most competent person on this site.

#16 Posted by nappystr8 (1126 posts) - - Show Bio

@jezer said:

Hahahaha, so true. A comic like this really helps to explain a complicated situation in a simple enough way for the people who just don't seem to understand. In a perfect world, the color of your skin would not matter in any context, and affirmative action would not need to exist. But we live in a society that was built upon institutional racism, and that system of inequality won't simply disappear if everyone becomes "color blind" (cough cough bull$@!t!!).

#17 Posted by novi_homines (1338 posts) - - Show Bio

Lol people seems to think that affirmative action only applies to minorities. Well newsflash, if it were not affirmative action, asians would easily make up the bulk of admissions.

#18 Edited by novi_homines (1338 posts) - - Show Bio

I have reached a point in my life (undergraduate) where racial issues doesn't affect me as it may have in the past. From being asked if i've ever been shot, to automatically being assumed a pot smoker. However one event, actually with a close white friend, was extremely hilarious. She asked me what I was, and I told her I was simply african. By both parents, who were full blown africans. Even though I was born and raised in chicago. She continued to persist for about three minutes on the issue, she had to be sure there was something else in me. It wasn't until the end of the conversation that I realized what had happened, I watched a video (below) a few weeks earlier, on this EXACT same scenario. Lol, I simply bursted out in laughter. I didn't consider it to be in the least bit racist, but maybe thats because it was a friend. Anyway I told her about the video and we shared a laugh.

#19 Edited by lykopis (10746 posts) - - Show Bio

I understand affirmative action. As for its relevance in today's society, I still believe it's needed. In Canada, it's heavily geared to our native peoples which I strongly support as access to university is already difficult due to environmental, economic and geographical reasons.

Things are better, but not anywhere near where it should be. Whatever we can do to even the score in terms of competing for coveted spots in universities which employers place a high regard on degrees obtained there then let's keep at it. Change begins from the bottom - true - but change comes a lot more quicker from the top. We need more representation from visible minorities in top positions, whether it's in the private sector or public. When I see the population of a country represented in those fields proportionately, then I might be convinced racism is no longer a factor and maybe then I can be convinced affirmative action is no longer needed.

#20 Posted by Ohgawd (129 posts) - - Show Bio

I think it's funny that people who aren't white are all considered minorities when white people are the minority of the world's population and continuing to decrease in number.

#21 Edited by Jezer (3129 posts) - - Show Bio

I have reached a point in my life (undergraduate) where racial issues doesn't affect me as it may have in the past. From being asked if i've ever been shot, to automatically being assumed a pot smoker. However one event, actually with a close white friend, was extremely hilarious. She asked me what I was, and I told her I was simply african. By both parents, who were full blown africans. Even though I was born and raised in chicago. She continued to persist for about three minutes on the issue, she had to be sure there was something else in me. It wasn't until the end of the conversation that I realized what had happened, I watched a video (below) a few weeks earlier, on this EXACT same scenario. Lol, I simply bursted out in laughter. I didn't consider it to be in the least bit racist, but maybe thats because it was a friend. Anyway I told her about the video and we shared a laugh.

Lmao that vid was great. I went and watched all four episodes; I wish they did more.

What African country?

#22 Posted by sagejonathan (1996 posts) - - Show Bio

I don't see what's so wrong with having ethnicity on college applications. Colleges want to be diverse so they want a variety of different students on campus. If they didn't take this into consideration than high level schools like Ivy League would only be filled with 99% Asians. I'm not trying to be racist at all but it's the truth.

#23 Edited by novi_homines (1338 posts) - - Show Bio

@jezer: Lol Yeah they're very entertaining. And nigeria.

#25 Posted by Akindoodle (1025 posts) - - Show Bio

@novi_homines: That was hilarious. Why can't they just leave it alone when you say you're Nigerian though? Happened a lot when I was younger because I was way lighter skinned. Not so much now (BTW, It's nice to meet another)

#26 Posted by Jezer (3129 posts) - - Show Bio

This thread is now about people from Nigeria.

Igbo checking in.

#27 Edited by novi_homines (1338 posts) - - Show Bio

@akindoodle said:

@novi_homines: That was hilarious. Why can't they just leave it alone when you say you're Nigerian though? Happened a lot when I was younger because I was way lighter skinned. Not so much now (BTW, It's nice to meet another)

I don't know. Lol I never thought it was a true thing when I watched the video until it actually happened to me. I don't have a problem with that though. There are much worse scenarios that can and have happened. And nice to meet you to man!