#1 Edited by Avenger85 (2017 posts) - - Show Bio

Call of Cthulu and Shadow Over Innsmouth are 2 of my favourite horror stories ever. By IMHO the best writer of the genre.

I'ts kinda sad to see that very few people these days actually remember his stories, as the current state of the horror genre is filled with absolute tripe.

Any other Cthulu/Dagon/H.P. Lovecraft fans out there ?

P.S. The Lurking Fear is also a great and underrated story.

#2 Posted by russellmania77 (15835 posts) - - Show Bio

Oh sh*t I thought his name was minecraft

#3 Posted by Decoy Elite (29923 posts) - - Show Bio

Never read any Lovecraft, then again I'm not really a big horror literature fan.

#4 Edited by Avenger85 (2017 posts) - - Show Bio

@decoy_elite:

Well if you can overlook the racism that pops up from time to time ( blame the era, not the man ), then you're gonna have a blast reading his stuff.

Even if you dont like Horror, but like something more interesting than Charles Dickens etc. I'm sure you're gonna find at least one of HPL's MANY stories interesting.

#5 Posted by Decoy Elite (29923 posts) - - Show Bio

@avenger85: Actually from what I've read Lovecraft was really racist even for his time period. Not saying it made him a bad writer, but I don't think the era he grew up in was the only problem.

I don't read many classic authors actually. Mostly because you basically have to translate a lot of the language, although it is usually worth it if the story is good enough (Shakespeare's works come to mind.)
Still I really do need to check out some Lovecraft at some point as his stuff is at least interesting enough to warrant a try.

#6 Posted by Decoy Elite (29923 posts) - - Show Bio

Oh sh*t I thought his name was minecraft

Story about a village of Enderman/civilian crossbreeds.

#7 Edited by russellmania77 (15835 posts) - - Show Bio
#8 Edited by Violens (543 posts) - - Show Bio

Rats in the walls. Lovecraft is awesome but is hardly forgotten. he has inspired many.

#9 Posted by Icarusflies (12513 posts) - - Show Bio

I'm a huge Lovecraft fan.

Moderator
#10 Posted by Gwahlur_Rising (256 posts) - - Show Bio

Ia!

#11 Posted by Veshark (9058 posts) - - Show Bio

Big Lovecraft fan here, too. I managed to get all of his stories in the Del Rey collected format, the painted covers look great.

Anyone here read his Dreamlands stuff? Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath was one of the longest, most extended and yet most epic novellas I have ever read. When I finished that story, I actually felt physically exhausted.

#12 Edited by turoksonofstone (12901 posts) - - Show Bio

Love Lovecraft

#13 Edited by sabracadabra (627 posts) - - Show Bio

I am a big Lovecraft fan. So many great stories. Some of my favorites are arthur jermyn, the outsider, re-animator, and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward.

#14 Posted by Farkam (5297 posts) - - Show Bio

His work is alright. Not exactly mind-blowing stuff, even for its genre.

#15 Posted by The_Legendary_SuperSaiyan_Hulk (11140 posts) - - Show Bio

I love Lovecraft :)

#16 Posted by Royal_Rumble_Man (513 posts) - - Show Bio

Azhathoth is the best idiot god out there

#17 Posted by Jonny_Anonymous (35129 posts) - - Show Bio

Lovecraft is amazing, I have a big Necronomicon hardcover, Dagon is one of my favorites

Online
#18 Posted by mrdecepticonleader (18731 posts) - - Show Bio

I have not really read any of his works. I should probably try to change that at some point :)

@farkam said:

His work is alright. Not exactly mind-blowing stuff, even for its genre.

?

#19 Posted by Avenger85 (2017 posts) - - Show Bio

@farkam said:

His work is alright. Not exactly mind-blowing stuff, even for its genre.

Well compared to the turd we have these days ( sparkly vampires & all that), yeah his work really is mind-blowing lol.

#20 Posted by warlock360 (28064 posts) - - Show Bio

@farkam said:

His work is alright. Not exactly mind-blowing stuff, even for its genre.

that current "genre" was immensively influenced by lovecraft.

#21 Posted by Mara (42 posts) - - Show Bio

Call of Cthulu and Shadow Over Innsmouth are 2 of my favourite horror stories ever. By IMHO the best writer of the genre.

I'ts kinda sad to see that very few people these days actually remember his stories, as the current state of the horror genre is filled with absolute tripe.

Any other Cthulu/Dagon/H.P. Lovecraft fans out there ?

P.S. The Lurking Fear is also a great and underrated story.

He wasn't that great, really. Some nice ideas, but his writing gets kinda stale. You reading Fatale?

#22 Posted by Veshark (9058 posts) - - Show Bio

@farkam said:

His work is alright. Not exactly mind-blowing stuff, even for its genre.

that current "genre" was immensively influenced by lovecraft.

Clive Barker, Thomas Ligotti, H.R. Giger, Stephen King, Neil Gaiman, John Carpenter, Robert Bloch, Ramsey Campbell, et cetera....

#23 Posted by Veshark (9058 posts) - - Show Bio

@mara said:

@avenger85 said:

Call of Cthulu and Shadow Over Innsmouth are 2 of my favourite horror stories ever. By IMHO the best writer of the genre.

I'ts kinda sad to see that very few people these days actually remember his stories, as the current state of the horror genre is filled with absolute tripe.

Any other Cthulu/Dagon/H.P. Lovecraft fans out there ?

P.S. The Lurking Fear is also a great and underrated story.

He wasn't that great, really. Some nice ideas, but his writing gets kinda stale. You reading Fatale?

Dude was mad influential. Came up with concepts and ideas that would remain with the genre for years to come. Words like 'cyclopean' or 'eldritch' are always associated with him. His writing style's extremely unique, focusing heavily on prose and exposition, with archaic words and a usage of subtle, existential horror. I'll admit that his earlier stories were kinda crappy, but the man really did get better as he progressed.

#24 Posted by Avenger85 (2017 posts) - - Show Bio

@veshark:

The best thing about the dude's writing is that he builds it up slowly, and with subtelty. Later on when it all goes south, wether you could predict what would happen or not ( like the dogs being aggressive towards the unearthed specimens in Mountains of Madness), the buildup and pace is constant.

No let-ups or dull moments. No pointless converstations and things which feel out-of topic from the story. And his ability to describe terrain ( if you are able to form a clear picture of a terrain described in literature in your head, then you know the author hit the bullseye) and attention to detail is vastly underrated.

#25 Posted by Veshark (9058 posts) - - Show Bio

@veshark:

The best thing about the dude's writing is that he builds it up slowly, and with subtelty. Later on when it all goes south, wether you could predict what would happen or not ( like the dogs being aggressive towards the unearthed specimens in Mountains of Madness), the buildup and pace is constant.

No let-ups or dull moments. No pointless converstations and things which feel out-of topic from the story. And his ability to describe terrain ( if you are able to form a clear picture of a terrain described in literature in your head, then you know the author hit the bullseye) and attention to detail is vastly underrated.

Mm agreed, At the Mountains of Madness was the apex of Lovecraft's ability to describe scenery. The way he conveyed the Arctic landscape and the city of the Elder Things - only word I can think of for that story is 'evocative'.

#26 Edited by RDClip (1167 posts) - - Show Bio

The general populace doesn't know him, but neither do they know Heinlien, Ellison or Pratchett. Generally people who don't read very much don't know about authors unless those authors have big huge movies or TV shows made about their work (JK Rowling, George RR Martin, Stephen King) I'm sure people who read, horror particularly, are aware of and probably have read Lovecraft.

#27 Posted by Farkam (5297 posts) - - Show Bio


@farkam said:

His work is alright. Not exactly mind-blowing stuff, even for its genre.

that current "genre" was immensively influenced by lovecraft.

I wasn't disputing that, so what are you on about?

@farkam said:

His work is alright. Not exactly mind-blowing stuff, even for its genre.

Well compared to the turd we have these days ( sparkly vampires & all that), yeah his work really is mind-blowing lol.

No doubt.

I have not really read any of his works. I should probably try to change that at some point :)

@farkam said:

His work is alright. Not exactly mind-blowing stuff, even for its genre.

?

?

: - )

#28 Edited by InnerSuperman (858 posts) - - Show Bio

he is good but he has nothing on king or Hitchcock

#29 Posted by mrdecepticonleader (18731 posts) - - Show Bio

@farkam: What do you mean by "even for its genre" ?

#30 Edited by Farkam (5297 posts) - - Show Bio

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam: What do you mean by "even for its genre" ?

Because horror isn't known for being mind-blowing in the first place.

#31 Posted by mrdecepticonleader (18731 posts) - - Show Bio

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam: What do you mean by "even for its genre" ?

Because horror isn't known for being mind-blowing in the first place.

I disagree.

#32 Edited by Farkam (5297 posts) - - Show Bio
#33 Edited by mrdecepticonleader (18731 posts) - - Show Bio
#34 Posted by Farkam (5297 posts) - - Show Bio
#35 Edited by mrdecepticonleader (18731 posts) - - Show Bio

@farkam: How so though?

How do you define mind blowing?

#36 Posted by Farkam (5297 posts) - - Show Bio

@farkam: How so though?

Because most horror is rather generic, not something that really stands out on it's own two feet. That's not really that hard to understand.

#37 Posted by mrdecepticonleader (18731 posts) - - Show Bio

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam: How so though?

Because most horror is rather generic, not something that really stands out on it's own two feet. That's not really that hard to understand.

Admittedly currently it maybe. But I assure the genre has being very influential over the years. Horror itself is a very unique genre since it manages to provoke those "uglier" emotions. It has its fair share of icons everyone knows who Dracula, Frankenstein are, zombies,ghouls ghosts. It is a very,very influential genre. You really cannot deny that.

#38 Posted by Farkam (5297 posts) - - Show Bio

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam: How so though?

Because most horror is rather generic, not something that really stands out on it's own two feet. That's not really that hard to understand.

Admittedly currently it maybe. But I assure the genre has being very influential over the years. Horror itself is a very unique genre since it manages to provoke those "uglier" emotions. It has its fair share of icons everyone knows who Dracula, Frankenstein are, zombies,ghouls ghosts. It is a very,very influential genre. You really cannot deny that.

I am not disputing it's influential nature or uniqueness.

#39 Posted by mrdecepticonleader (18731 posts) - - Show Bio

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam: How so though?

Because most horror is rather generic, not something that really stands out on it's own two feet. That's not really that hard to understand.

Admittedly currently it maybe. But I assure the genre has being very influential over the years. Horror itself is a very unique genre since it manages to provoke those "uglier" emotions. It has its fair share of icons everyone knows who Dracula, Frankenstein are, zombies,ghouls ghosts. It is a very,very influential genre. You really cannot deny that.

I am not disputing it's influential nature or uniqueness.

So I ask again what do you mean by "mind blowing". Since it has stood out. I am not sure what you mean. Maybe you could explain in a little more detail.

#40 Edited by Farkam (5297 posts) - - Show Bio

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam: How so though?

Because most horror is rather generic, not something that really stands out on it's own two feet. That's not really that hard to understand.

Admittedly currently it maybe. But I assure the genre has being very influential over the years. Horror itself is a very unique genre since it manages to provoke those "uglier" emotions. It has its fair share of icons everyone knows who Dracula, Frankenstein are, zombies,ghouls ghosts. It is a very,very influential genre. You really cannot deny that.

I am not disputing it's influential nature or uniqueness.

So I ask again what do you mean by "mind blowing". Since it has stood out. I am not sure what you mean. Maybe you could explain in a little more detail.

"I am not disputing it's influential nature or uniqueness."

I was talking about the genre itself, not Lovecrafts work.

#41 Posted by mrdecepticonleader (18731 posts) - - Show Bio

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam: How so though?

Because most horror is rather generic, not something that really stands out on it's own two feet. That's not really that hard to understand.

Admittedly currently it maybe. But I assure the genre has being very influential over the years. Horror itself is a very unique genre since it manages to provoke those "uglier" emotions. It has its fair share of icons everyone knows who Dracula, Frankenstein are, zombies,ghouls ghosts. It is a very,very influential genre. You really cannot deny that.

I am not disputing it's influential nature or uniqueness.

So I ask again what do you mean by "mind blowing". Since it has stood out. I am not sure what you mean. Maybe you could explain in a little more detail.

"I am not disputing it's influential nature or uniqueness."

I was talking about the genre itself, not Lovecrafts work.

And I was talking about the horror genre in general not Lovecrafts work. You said you its not "mind blowing" so I am asking why you think so.

The defenition of mind blowing is as follows.

mind-blow·ing (mndblng)

adj. Informal
1. Producing hallucinatory effects: mind-blowing drugs.
2. Intensely affecting the mind or emotions: a mind-blowing horror story.
See really the second definition that is as I said and you agreed that the horror genre affects peoples emotions/mindset when watching horror films and whatnot. So how is horror not mind blowing?

#42 Posted by Farkam (5297 posts) - - Show Bio

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam: How so though?

Because most horror is rather generic, not something that really stands out on it's own two feet. That's not really that hard to understand.

Admittedly currently it maybe. But I assure the genre has being very influential over the years. Horror itself is a very unique genre since it manages to provoke those "uglier" emotions. It has its fair share of icons everyone knows who Dracula, Frankenstein are, zombies,ghouls ghosts. It is a very,very influential genre. You really cannot deny that.

I am not disputing it's influential nature or uniqueness.

So I ask again what do you mean by "mind blowing". Since it has stood out. I am not sure what you mean. Maybe you could explain in a little more detail.

"I am not disputing it's influential nature or uniqueness."

I was talking about the genre itself, not Lovecrafts work.

And I was talking about the horror genre in general not Lovecrafts work. You said you its not "mind blowing" so I am asking why you think so.

The defenition of mind blowing is as follows.

mind-blow·ing (mndblng)

adj.

Informal

1. Producing hallucinatory effects: mind-blowing drugs.2. Intensely affecting the mind or emotions: a mind-blowing horror story. See really the second definition that is as I said and you agreed that the horror genre affects peoples emotions/mindset when watching horror films and whatnot. So how is horror not mind blowing?

With that said I haven't disputed the influential nature of Lovecrafts work either. I just don't find it all to unique, despite the hype, and in my opinion horror isn't all that unique or "mind-blowing" in general. : - )

#43 Posted by mrdecepticonleader (18731 posts) - - Show Bio

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam said:

@mrdecepticonleader said:

@farkam: How so though?

Because most horror is rather generic, not something that really stands out on it's own two feet. That's not really that hard to understand.

Admittedly currently it maybe. But I assure the genre has being very influential over the years. Horror itself is a very unique genre since it manages to provoke those "uglier" emotions. It has its fair share of icons everyone knows who Dracula, Frankenstein are, zombies,ghouls ghosts. It is a very,very influential genre. You really cannot deny that.

I am not disputing it's influential nature or uniqueness.

So I ask again what do you mean by "mind blowing". Since it has stood out. I am not sure what you mean. Maybe you could explain in a little more detail.

"I am not disputing it's influential nature or uniqueness."

I was talking about the genre itself, not Lovecrafts work.

And I was talking about the horror genre in general not Lovecrafts work. You said you its not "mind blowing" so I am asking why you think so.

The defenition of mind blowing is as follows.

mind-blow·ing (mndblng)

adj.

Informal

1. Producing hallucinatory effects: mind-blowing drugs.2. Intensely affecting the mind or emotions: a mind-blowing horror story. See really the second definition that is as I said and you agreed that the horror genre affects peoples emotions/mindset when watching horror films and whatnot. So how is horror not mind blowing?

With that said I haven't disputed the influential nature of Lovecrafts work either. I just don't find it all to unique, despite the hype, and in my opinion horror isn't all that unique or "mind-blowing" in general. : - )

Really? Eh okay.