#1 Edited by DeathpooltheT1000 (11415 posts) - - Show Bio

When Dmitry Argarkov was sent a letter offering him a credit card, he found the rates not to his liking. But he didn't throw the contract away or shred it. Instead, the 42-year-old from Voronezh, Russia, scanned it into his computer, altered the terms and sent it back to Tinkoff Credit Systems.

Mr Argarkov's version of the contract contained a 0pc interest rate, no fees and no credit limit. Every time the bank failed to comply with the rules, he would fine them 3m rubles (£58,716). If Tinkoff tried to cancel the contract, it would have to pay him 6m rubles.

Tinkoff apparently failed to read the amendments, signed the contract and sent Mr Argakov a credit card.

"The Bank confirmed its agreement to the client's terms and sent him a credit card and a copy of the approved application form," his lawyer Dmitry Mikhalevich told Kommersant. "The opened credit line was unlimited. He could afford to buy an island somewhere in Malaysia, and the bank would have to pay for it by law."

The guy is so smart, he must be an ALIEN!!

Or Uncle Phil

#2 Posted by ARMIV2 (8673 posts) - - Show Bio

Wait, wait, wait, his bank ACTUALLY O.K-ed his terms and conditions?!

#3 Posted by DeathpooltheT1000 (11415 posts) - - Show Bio

@armiv2 said:

Wait, wait, wait, his bank ACTUALLY O.K-ed his terms and conditions?!

Yes, that why he is doing this.

#4 Posted by ARMIV2 (8673 posts) - - Show Bio

...

Huh...

#5 Posted by DeathpooltheT1000 (11415 posts) - - Show Bio

@armiv2 said:

...

Huh...

They say yes to his rules, now they dont want to follow them.

#6 Posted by Wolverine08 (43582 posts) - - Show Bio

#7 Posted by SpideyPresence (1906 posts) - - Show Bio

Wow.... why didn't I think of this :'(

#8 Posted by ARMIV2 (8673 posts) - - Show Bio

@armiv2 said:

...

Huh...

They say yes to his rules, now they dont want to follow them.

That's...I don't even know what to say to that.
Beats Me

#9 Posted by Nefarious (21243 posts) - - Show Bio

Now, I've heard it all.....

#10 Posted by Bruxae (14004 posts) - - Show Bio

They should pay him, and read the contract in the future.

#11 Edited by JetiiMitra (8710 posts) - - Show Bio

Where's this story from?

Edit: Nevermind, found it.

#12 Posted by M3th (2099 posts) - - Show Bio

Ffffff... Forget the Bank screw them all. They always abuse people who don't read the print their agreeing to and once they get a taste of their own medicine they want to not follow the contract. Gets me frustrated.

#13 Edited by JediXMan (30902 posts) - - Show Bio

The people at the bank were idiots for not reading the document.

The guy was actually smart. Don't know how this would hold up in court, though. If it actually does, I applaud the man,

Moderator
#14 Edited by dondave (38442 posts) - - Show Bio

Is it actually legal though, I'm sure they could claim Forgery

#15 Edited by JediXMan (30902 posts) - - Show Bio

@dondave said:

Is it actually legal though, I'm sure they could claim Forgery

I think the loophole would be that the company approved of the document previously to its alteration, and that is the only document that is valid, not any future alterations.

I don't see the guy winning. If he did, it would only open the door to other people trying to pull this off, and the judge knows that. He won't win simply because of that.

Moderator
#16 Posted by Glitch_Spawn (17132 posts) - - Show Bio

This man is my hero if the day.

#17 Posted by DeathpooltheT1000 (11415 posts) - - Show Bio

@jedixman said:

@dondave said:

Is it actually legal though, I'm sure they could claim Forgery

I think the loophole would be that the company approved of the document previously to its alteration, and that is the only document that is valid, not any future alterations.

I don't see the guy winning. If he did, it would only open the door to other people trying to pull this off, and the judge knows that. He won't win simply because of that.

And that is the sad part, because is evidence is not about the law and justice, is about keeping the Status Quo and helping agendas.