#1 Posted by Cryo-Wolf (12662 posts) - - Show Bio

yup. The cloned a sheep named Dolly before.

#2 Posted by The Mighty Thor (7469 posts) - - Show Bio

is it

#3 Posted by Sparda (15795 posts) - - Show Bio

Yeah.....it died pretty fast though, didn't it?

#4 Posted by The Mighty Thor (7469 posts) - - Show Bio

Cryo-Wolf says:

"yup. The cloned a sheep named Dolly before."

really what a human

#5 Posted by The Mighty Thor (7469 posts) - - Show Bio

Sparda says:

"Yeah.....it died pretty fast though, didn't it?"

so what it did that thing that kaine had in the comics or was it diffrenet

#6 Posted by The Mighty Thor (7469 posts) - - Show Bio

Sparda says:

"Yeah.....it died pretty fast though, didn't it?"

your talking about the sheep?

#7 Posted by Cryo-Wolf (12662 posts) - - Show Bio

I don't think a human yet. They probably will be able to if they cloned something already. I don't know whether it died quickly, but they did.

What about test tube babies? Are those technically cloned? I'm confused on that subject.

#8 Posted by zee crusher (8997 posts) - - Show Bio

In comics they made a whole nother person who care from a machine or something in real life it was like clone of cells meaning exactly alike you could easily do that to make twins in a mom by slightly spliting the thingy making one baby or make simease twins lol.

#9 Posted by The Mighty Thor (7469 posts) - - Show Bio

Cryo-Wolf says:

"I don't think a human *yet*. They probably will be able to if they cloned something already. I don't know whether it died quickly, but they did. What about test tube babies? Are those technically cloned? I'm confused on that subject."

i'm confused with clones a little like did the sheep ever genetic disfiguration would subsequently cause a bizzare mutation in the clone. like kaine did cause i'm not sure if comic clones and real clones are the same thing

#10 Posted by NiteFly (1459 posts) - - Show Bio

Cryo-Wolf says:

"What about test tube babies? Are those technically cloned? I'm confused on that subject."

"Test tube baby" describes a baby created using in vitro fertilization. Basically a sperm and egg are combined outside of the body so that the egg can be fertilized, and after a certain gestation in a test tube (hence the name) it is put into the human. The effect is pretty much the same as a baby created by normal means, so it is quite different from a clone (which is genetically identical to the original).

#11 Posted by Sparda (15795 posts) - - Show Bio

The sheep died from organ failure, a affect from the cloning proceedure. I think.

#12 Posted by Cryo-Wolf (12662 posts) - - Show Bio

NiteFly says:

"Cryo-Wolf says:
"What about test tube babies? Are those technically cloned? I'm confused on that subject."
"Test tube baby" describes a baby created using in vitro fertilization. Basically a sperm and egg are combined outside of the body so that the egg can be fertilized, and after a certain gestation in a test tube (hence the name) it is put into the human. The effect is pretty much the same as a baby created by normal means, so it is quite different from a clone (which is genetically identical to the original)."

yea, I didn't know ho the whle thing wored so....

#13 Posted by The Mighty Thor (7469 posts) - - Show Bio

Sparda says:

"The sheep died from organ failure, a affect from the cloning proceedure. I think."

o okay how did his organs failed?

#14 Posted by Eternal Chaos (22990 posts) - - Show Bio

Cloning is possible. A human, being that the tech has become so much more advanced since Dolly was cloned that it might be possible to create a human clone.

#15 Posted by The Mighty Thor (7469 posts) - - Show Bio

Eternal Chaos says:

"Cloning is possible. A human, being that the tech has become so much more advanced since Dolly was cloned that it might be possible to create a human clone."

what about the organ failure

#16 Posted by Eternal Chaos (22990 posts) - - Show Bio

spiderman0409 says:

"Eternal Chaos says:
"Cloning is possible. A human, being that the tech has become so much more advanced since Dolly was cloned that it might be possible to create a human clone."
what about the organ failure"

Like I said, tech is so much more advanced now that its possible that the organ failure won't even happen again. The process is still in testing (that we know of) but the way its done is debateable. I personally feel that we need to unlock every part of the human genome in order to create an exact clone. (we haven't found every part yet have we?). Cloning is complicated because of the number of cells in a human the memories and everything. It's just a series of cell analysis and replication. But like I said, it's a bitch.

#17 Posted by Phorqe (2109 posts) - - Show Bio

List of species cloned:

#18 Posted by The Mighty Thor (7469 posts) - - Show Bio

Phorqe says:

"List of species cloned: # 1 African Wildcat # 2 Carp # 3 Cats # 4 Cattle # 5 Deer # 6 Dog # 7 Ferret # 8 Fruit Flies # 9 Goat # 10 Gaur # 11 Horse # 12 Mice # 13 Mouflon # 14 Mule # 15 Pig # 16 Rabbit # 17 Rat # 18 Rhesus Monkey # 19 Sheep # 20 Water Buffalo # 21 Wolf"

who the hell clones a fruit fly even if it was a failure it would die

#19 Posted by Phorqe (2109 posts) - - Show Bio

I got this from Wikipedia, it has works cited, but I didn't actually check the references, take it for what it is:

The success rate of cloning has been low: Dolly the sheep was born after 277 eggs were used to create 29 embryos, which only produced three lambs at birth, only one of which lived, Dolly. Seventy calves have been created from 9,000 attempts and one third of them died young; Prometea took 328 attempts, and, more recently, Paris Texas was created after 400 attempts. Notably, although the first clones were frogs, no adult cloned frog has yet been produced from a somatic adult nucleus donor cell.

There were early claims that Dolly the Sheep had accelerated aging. Aging of this type is thought to be due to the shortening of telomeres, regions at the tips of chromosomes which prevent genetic threads from fraying every time a cell divides. Over time telomeres get worn down until cell-division is no longer possible — this is thought to be a cause of aging. However, subsequent studies showed that, if anything, Dolly's telomere were longer than normal.[verification needed] Dolly died in the year of 2003. Ian Wilmut said that Dolly's early death had nothing to do with cloning but with a respiratory infection common to lambs raised like Dolly.

Consistent with Dolly's telomeres being longer, analysis of the telomeres from cloned cows showed that they were also longer. This suggests clones could live longer life spans although many died young after excessive growth. Researchers think that this could eventually be developed to reverse aging in humans, provided that this is based chiefly on the shortening of telomeres. Although some work has been performed on telomeres and aging in nuclear transfer clones, the evidence is at an early stage.[3]

#20 Posted by The Mighty Thor (7469 posts) - - Show Bio

Phorqe says:

"I got this from Wikipedia, it has works cited, but I didn't actually check the references, take it for what it is: The success rate of cloning has been low: Dolly the sheep was born after 277 eggs were used to create 29 embryos, which only produced three lambs at birth, only one of which lived, Dolly. Seventy calves have been created from 9,000 attempts and one third of them died young; Prometea took 328 attempts, and, more recently, Paris Texas was created after 400 attempts. Notably, although the first clones were frogs, no adult cloned frog has yet been produced from a somatic adult nucleus donor cell. There were early claims that Dolly the Sheep had accelerated aging. Aging of this type is thought to be due to the shortening of telomeres, regions at the tips of chromosomes which prevent genetic threads from fraying every time a cell divides. Over time telomeres get worn down until cell-division is no longer possible — this is thought to be a cause of aging. However, subsequent studies showed that, if anything, Dolly's telomere were longer than normal.[verification needed] Dolly died in the year of 2003. Ian Wilmut said that Dolly's early death had nothing to do with cloning but with a respiratory infection common to lambs raised like Dolly. Consistent with Dolly's telomeres being longer, analysis of the telomeres from cloned cows showed that they were also longer. This suggests clones could live longer life spans although many died young after excessive growth. Researchers think that this could eventually be developed to reverse aging in humans, provided that this is based chiefly on the shortening of telomeres. Although some work has been performed on telomeres and aging in nuclear transfer clones, the evidence is at an early stage.[3]"

i got some of that and others i need a translation

#21 Posted by Phorqe (2109 posts) - - Show Bio

Ok, humans most likely can be cloned. However there are many problems this would create, both legally and ethically. For all any of us know, there are humans that have been cloned in secret. The sheep Dolly was kept in secret for about a year. If a human was cloned, it would essentially be the same science involved in cloning a sheep or a rhesus monkey.

No company would announce that they cloned something unless they thought it was successful. The sheep that they cloned only lived about 6 years(not sure about sheep's life span). Some problems I can imagine involved with cloning a human would be developing the brain, as well as proper functions of any vital organ, for some reason the liver comes to mind. Those always shut down.

So hypothetically, it's possible. Most of the animals that have been announced to have been cloned are recent, so it's uncertain if any of them are "successful."

I used to work for a hospital that did a lot of research. I wouldn't say it's out of the question for some private developer with a very wealthy backer to be looking into cloning people. I don't think it's likely though.

#22 Posted by The Mighty Thor (7469 posts) - - Show Bio

Phorqe says:

"Ok, humans most likely can be cloned. However there are many problems this would create, both legally and ethically. For all any of us know, there are humans that have been cloned in secret. The sheep Dolly was kept in secret for about a year. If a human was cloned, it would essentially be the same science involved in cloning a sheep or a rhesus monkey. No company would announce that they cloned something unless they thought it was successful. The sheep that they cloned only lived about 6 years(not sure about sheep's life span). Some problems I can imagine involved with cloning a human would be developing the brain, as well as proper functions of any vital organ, for some reason the liver comes to mind. Those always shut down. So hypothetically, it's possible. Most of the animals that have been announced to have been cloned are recent, so it's uncertain if any of them are "successful." I used to work for a hospital that did a lot of research. I wouldn't say it's out of the question for some private developer with a very wealthy backer to be looking into cloning people. I don't think it's likely though."

yea but wouldn't cloning a human be much harder

#23 Posted by Phorqe (2109 posts) - - Show Bio

Trial and error.....

#24 Posted by Sparda (15795 posts) - - Show Bio

So, do you guys think it's wrong to clone a human? It's not like I do, but this seems to be a controversial subject.

#25 Posted by The Mighty Thor (7469 posts) - - Show Bio

Sparda says:

"So, do you guys think it's wrong to clone a human? It's not like I do, but this seems to be a controversial subject."

i guess cloning is kind of cool but i think its kind of wrong like people will probably only clone to use it to take a organ the real person needs like that movie i forgot the name of it but cloning can help understand dna alot. but a positive thing is that they couls use it to help endangered animals and clone them and they mate and the population grows or maybe they can use it to cloe a dinosaur if possible like that would be cool but by clonig a dinosaur we can fully understand it like what color would it be or how it acts like all the dinosaur books are bascially educated guess o and they can figure out if t-rex actually lay eggs or not

#26 Posted by Cosmic Mancer (195 posts) - - Show Bio

a sheeps dies around the age of 12 and 13

#27 Posted by Sparda (15795 posts) - - Show Bio

The movie was called "The Island". Yeah, I agree with you Spider. They should clone for knowledge, not profit or personal gain. Well, I'm gonna go for tonight......see ya tomorrow.
Post Edited:2007-08-02 22:53:10

#28 Posted by Cosmic Mancer (195 posts) - - Show Bio

Dolly died at the age of six. the sheep that dolly was cloned from was six years old. What some people belive is that Dolly was born with the body of a six year old sheep.

#29 Posted by Kurtis Iverson (87 posts) - - Show Bio

Sparda says:

"So, do you guys think it's wrong to clone a human? It's not like I do, but this seems to be a controversial subject."

There was a movie just like this called the Island. Rich people paid to have a clone of themselves in case they needed an organ transplant or something like that.

The clones all lived in this like giant underground facility. They had been told the world was gone or some $#@! like that. All except this island, they would hold a lottery and if you won you got to go to this island. But really there was no island and the clones (who didn't know they were clones) would be killed and there organs used to fix the real them.

#30 Posted by The Mighty Thor (7469 posts) - - Show Bio

Sparda says:

"The movie was called "The Island". Yeah, I agree with you Spider. They should clone for knowledge, not profit or personal gain. Well, I'm gonna go for tonight......see ya tomorrow.
Post Edited:2007-08-02 22:53:10"

yea like people can selfess they create a clone for them self so they can live but the clone will die cloning should only be use to understand the world see ya Sparda

#31 Posted by CanadianWolverine (417 posts) - - Show Bio

Is cloning a human bad? My first instinct would be that it wouldn't be, as it would be just another way to create another human. Though, if the clone did any sexual reproduction, as well as the original, couldn't that potentially make the human gene pool a little smaller, sorta like a bit of in-breeding?

But without some results on the consequences of cloning a human being, it is really hard to say. If there were a bunch of new diseases or say the clones were all manicly depressed or whatever seems like a horrible fate for any of us to live, that would say to me its a bad thing.

If it could be done with a clear conscience, why not? If there is no risk to our immortal souls, that wouldn't be bad at all. But if we had to let a little bit of ourselves die for it, forget it. It would be no different from nazis experimenting on prisoners then.

#32 Posted by The_MVPs (84694 posts) - - Show Bio

CanadianWolverine says:

"Is cloning a human bad? My first instinct would be that it wouldn't be, as it would be just another way to create another human. Though, if the clone did any sexual reproduction, as well as the original, couldn't that potentially make the human gene pool a little smaller, sorta like a bit of in-breeding?But without some results on the consequences of cloning a human being, it is really hard to say. If there were a bunch of new diseases or say the clones were all manicly depressed or whatever seems like a horrible fate for any of us to live, that would say to me its a bad thing.If it could be done with a clear conscience, why not? If there is no risk to our immortal souls, that wouldn't be bad at all. But if we had to let a little bit of ourselves die for it, forget it. It would be no different from nazis experimenting on prisoners then."

Its a slippery slop. Who's to say a clone wouldn't have a soul? Would a clone know it was a clone? Would we let it live a normal life or would we use them for spare parts. I don't know either way. I guess I don't have a problem with it seeing as how I'm for stem cell research but clones is a whole new level of what ifs

Moderator
#33 Posted by The Mighty Thor (7469 posts) - - Show Bio

Gambler says:

"CanadianWolverine says:
"Is cloning a human bad? My first instinct would be that it wouldn't be, as it would be just another way to create another human. Though, if the clone did any sexual reproduction, as well as the original, couldn't that potentially make the human gene pool a little smaller, sorta like a bit of in-breeding? But without some results on the consequences of cloning a human being, it is really hard to say. If there were a bunch of new diseases or say the clones were all manicly depressed or whatever seems like a horrible fate for any of us to live, that would say to me its a bad thing. If it could be done with a clear conscience, why not? If there is no risk to our immortal souls, that wouldn't be bad at all. But if we had to let a little bit of ourselves die for it, forget it. It would be no different from nazis experimenting on prisoners then."
Its a slippery slop. Who's to say a clone wouldn't have a soul? Would a clone know it was a clone? Would we let it live a normal life or would we use them for spare parts. I don't know either way. I guess I don't have a problem with it seeing as how I'm for stem cell research but clones is a whole new level of *what ifs*"

i think a clone is human so it does have a soul

#34 Posted by Eternus (692 posts) - - Show Bio

Cosmic Mancer says:

"Dolly died at the age of six. the sheep that dolly was cloned from was six years old. What some people belive is that Dolly was born with the body of a six year old sheep. "

yeha wernt the cells already aged that much cuz it was an exact copy

XD

#35 Posted by Cosmic Sentinel (3749 posts) - - Show Bio

This is from an article in New Scientist I used in on of my college projects (on why we aren't cloning humans yet):

Cloned monkey embryos are a "gallery of horrors"

A high percentage of cloned monkey embryos that look healthy are really a "gallery of horrors" deep within, says a researcher at Advanced Cell Technology, the company that last month published the first paper on cloned human embryos.

This could mean that there is something unique about primate eggs that will make cloning monkeys or people far more difficult than cloning other animals. At the very least, the experiments show that there's a lot to learn before primates can be cloned.

Tanja Dominko, who presented the results last week at a conference in Washington DC, did the work before joining ACT, while she was working for the reproductive biologist Gerald Schatten at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center in Beaverton.

Several groups have been trying for years to clone monkeys, but while the embryos look normal, no one has ever got them to develop further.

Uneven scatter

To try and figure out what was going wrong, Dominko looked at 265 cloned rhesus macaque embryos created by nuclear transfer - plucking out an egg's nucleus and then adding a nucleus from a donor cell. She followed development of the embryos through several divisions, from the two-cell stage until the 32-cell stage.

Though they appeared superficially healthy, the cells in the vast majority of Dominko's embryos did not form distinct nuclei containing all the chromosomes. Instead, the chromosomes were scattered unevenly throughout the cells.

"The surprising thing is that these cells keep dividing," says Dominko. Some embryos developed to the stage known as a blastocyst, but by day six or seven they had started to look abnormal.

The cloned human embryos created by ACT didn't even get this far. Only one reached the six-cell stage.

Full article: http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn1679