#1 Posted by Lvenger (18474 posts) - - Show Bio

On the way home tonight, whilst listening to the radio, there was an interview of Ian Rankin, a Scottish crime writer on his latest novel, Standing in Another Man's Grave. When the radio presenter read out emails/texts from the listeners, one praised the book for making the main character, Rebus feel like a real person who made mistakes rather than a "wholly unrealistic superhuman." Now this criticism may not reflect the listener's views on comic books and the superhero genre, but it is a common misconception made of comic books. Especially in these recent years, comic books have been all about characters with distinct personalities, personal issues like work and romance problems and relationships with friends, family and a significant other. The abnormal, sci fi, cosmic or mystical adventures these characters experience is just part of their charm. Without good character dynamics to add to the story, comic books would be all the more dull for it. So do you Viners think people make this judgement of comic books a lot or am I making a big deal of things here?

#2 Posted by Jonny_Anonymous (32893 posts) - - Show Bio

I love Ian Rankin, I have a signed copy of his novel Tooth & Nail ^_^ 
 
As for superheroes I want them to be realistic as possible, I want them to be wrong, I want them to make mistakes, I want them to be jerks sometimes. Flawed characters are more interesting to me because I like to see how they deal with situations    

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#3 Posted by Lvenger (18474 posts) - - Show Bio

@Jonny_Anonymous: This latest one is another addition in his detective series about a detective called Rebus. Ever heard of him? As for your comment about flawed characters, I agree greatly but I feel I need to add to the OP a bit on Superman and why he is realistic even though people say he isn't. Specifically I'm looking for human characters in comic books and Superman fits the bill on being human as much as the flawed characters. But flawed characters as innovated by Marvel showcase why comic books are not unrealistic in terms of the characters in them.

#4 Posted by Jonny_Anonymous (32893 posts) - - Show Bio
@Lvenger: Sure have, I have almost all his books. My favourite is Doors Open about an art gallery heist. The  flawless boyscout image Superman has is a myth yet pepole still seam to cling to it.  
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#5 Posted by Lvenger (18474 posts) - - Show Bio

@Jonny_Anonymous: For some reason they think it's 'cool' to be Superman haters and mock his apparent boy scout, goody two shoes visage. It still bewilders me today.

#6 Edited by Guardiandevil83 (5354 posts) - - Show Bio

I actually had this conversation with my high school crush. She just happens to have a four year old daughter who is already into comics and even asked to be Batgirl for halloween! Anyway, my crush has been buying anything comic related to appease her childs comic thirst, which includes of course the 90's and 2000 televison collections and films. She'd call me and ask about certain characters, locations, items, ect, and is becoming a fan herself. We are suppose to attend miami's wondercon for my birthday if they have it this year that is. Well long story short, she noticed that the stories were enjoyable for adults as well, and she asked if this was new..I was like ''noooo.... just because the stories are illustrated rather then purely written in ink does not make them any less adult/mature." She's into it now. Bigger Dc fan then I am, but whatever. lol

#7 Posted by Lvenger (18474 posts) - - Show Bio

@Guardiandevil83: Well she sounds like someone who has an open minded attitude on this subject. I remember watching a quiz show several months ago where a question about which character was the most popular Robin came up. The person got the question wrong and afterwards said "Well I used to read comics when I was younger but I'm too old for them now. They're a bit silly and childish for me." That displayed a lack of understanding the comics medium.

#8 Posted by Guardiandevil83 (5354 posts) - - Show Bio

@Lvenger said:

@Guardiandevil83: Well she sounds like someone who has an open minded attitude on this subject. I remember watching a quiz show several months ago where a question about which character was the most popular Robin came up. The person got the question wrong and afterwards said "Well I used to read comics when I was younger but I'm too old for them now. They're a bit silly and childish for me." That displayed a lack of understanding the comics medium.

Naaaaaaah That just shows someone too immature to take a loss. lol Like if you beat someone in MK, and their like, ''well I don't play video games." Yet they have a Xbox Ken at home.

#9 Posted by AtPhantom (14521 posts) - - Show Bio

I think you're seriously misinterpreting the comment. There's nothing in there to suggest he was thinking about superheroes or comics in general. Most likely he was thinking about other crime mystery characters like Sherlock Holmes or Hercule Poirot who tower intellectually over the other characters in the story and are always three steps ahead of them, but ahead of the readers as well. Thus, they are 'superhuman' in their abilities. This is a criticism present in comicbooks but is far from unique to it so I really don't see why you'd instantly associate them together (Well, I do see, but you get my point).

#10 Posted by Yai_Inn (352 posts) - - Show Bio

Grant Morrison's rant on this topic is kinda funny.