#1 Edited by MightySammy94 (21 posts) - - Show Bio

This is coming from something my English teacher said. She said comics can be analyzed the same way we analyze books in class, you know looking at literary elements in them, do you agree that comics can be studied in this way too? If they can do you think they should? Does looking at them like that take the fun out of it or should knightfall , judas contract, maximum carnage and things like that be the frankensteins of the future. Btw wich graphic novels or story arcs do you think would make for the best analysis if they were to be analyzed

#2 Posted by xybernauts (853 posts) - - Show Bio

I think the analysis of comics is what makes comics fun. Usually, the comics that aren't worth analyzing lack depth and thus aren't worth reading.

#3 Posted by Imagine_Man15 (1801 posts) - - Show Bio

Absolutely, there are plenty of comics with themes ripe for analyzing. Granted there are many others that lack depth, but the same could be said for any other form of media.

#4 Posted by ShadowMonkey (70 posts) - - Show Bio

I believe Watchmen, not Before Watchmen, but the original Alan Moore graphic novel will demonstrate that comics can be analyzed in the same depth as some of the great novels that are used as learning tools in the classroom. If you have not read Watchmen, and you are interested in dissecting a book based on literary accomplishment, I believe you would thoroughly enjoy it.

#5 Posted by Agent9149 (2868 posts) - - Show Bio

Yes.

#6 Posted by NiKva (94 posts) - - Show Bio

They could be, but they shouldn't. Just like literary analyzing, people will dissect the literature until they stray entirely off the author's message.

#7 Posted by Cap10nate (2726 posts) - - Show Bio

I think it is just like novels. For every Atlas Shrugged, For Whom the Bell Tolls or 1984, there is a dozen Twilight or Nicholas Sparks or Nora Roberts trash novels. Some of it has literary merit, but not all of it.

#8 Posted by xybernauts (853 posts) - - Show Bio

@ShadowMonkey said:

I believe Watchmen, not Before Watchmen, but the original Alan Moore graphic novel will demonstrate that comics can be analyzed in the same depth as some of the great novels that are used as learning tools in the classroom. If you have not read Watchmen, and you are interested in dissecting a book based on literary accomplishment, I believe you would thoroughly enjoy it.

QFT

#9 Posted by InnerVenom123 (29510 posts) - - Show Bio

Yes.

#10 Posted by Manbehindthewires (344 posts) - - Show Bio

I was never a believer in literary analysis in English classes. "You can tell by the writer's use of the word you're that he was infact describing a camel he once saw as a child, not anything to do with the actual character....or even the book for that matter" Still not a believer in qualifications that rely on interpretation.

#11 Posted by turoksonofstone (12901 posts) - - Show Bio

@xybernauts said:

I think the analysis of comics is what makes comics fun. Usually, the comics that aren't worth analyzing lack depth and thus aren't worth reading.

#12 Posted by Daaerk (204 posts) - - Show Bio

Yeah they could.

But you couldn't scientifically analyze it...It wouldn't make sense at ALL.

@xybernauts said:

I think the analysis of comics is what makes comics fun. Usually, the comics that aren't worth analyzing lack depth and thus aren't worth reading.

I love this post.

Daaerk

#13 Edited by chocobojam (288 posts) - - Show Bio

Seriously, whats the difference between batman and superman compared to moby dick and tom sawyer.

likewise' whats the difference between new gods and apokolips compared to gods and goddesses in greek mythology.

#14 Posted by redhoodnet (153 posts) - - Show Bio

I agree that a critical view can be used to judge comics. But you need to be aware of what you are looking at. Every comic IMHO has sides to it storytelling as well as art which does set it aside from other normal printed media.

I think there is always times that we look at books that serve one but not both of these things.

In a normal novel setting it would be very rare to say you hated the story but the art moved you.

I think a great comic book has the chance to move you on two levels... great art and a great story. And when those two come together you have something truly special.

Sometimes you can can love one and hate the other part. But you always can look at something with a critical eye.

#15 Posted by akbogert (3227 posts) - - Show Bio

Full disclosure: I have a B.A. in English & Communication Studies, which means a background in literary, film, and theatrical criticism. And I was just accepted into a Ph.D. program -- to study video games the same way.

Point is, if a medium is used to tell stories and explore aspects of human nature and the universe, you'd better believe there's room for analysis and criticism. A few thousand years ago it was noted that "the unexamined life is not worth living" and that has never ceased to be true. I'd argue that anything done completely mindlessly and without consideration of its intrinsic value is a waste of the precious little time each of us has to live. Sure, sometimes you need to shut off the critical thinking and just relax and enjoy something. But as a general rule, I must believe that the writers and artists who make these books value their work as good writing and good art, and to that extent a comic should be examined based on how well it attains the high standards of other forms of writing and art, and how it maximizes its unique position as a synthesis of the two. That is to say, a comic book cannot be judged purely on its writing or on its art, though literary and artistic criticism will definitely factor into those judgements.

It is an artistic and narrative medium. To refuse to analyze it would be equivalent to saying it is entirely meaningless and banal. And I don't know about you, but I'd like to think we're all about something a bit more than that, eh?

#16 Posted by roboadmiral (553 posts) - - Show Bio

@NiKva said:

They could be, but they shouldn't. Just like literary analyzing, people will dissect the literature until they stray entirely off the author's message.

What? The entire point of the dissection is to get to the core of the matter. So what you're saying is that we shouldn't take a deeper look into written works or think critically about them because that might make us miss the point? How does that make any sense?

To answer the initial question. Yes, yes you should. That is half the fun. Think about it, roll around in it, but only as much as you want to. If you're just here to watch guys in tights fly around and shoot lasers at each other, that's cool too. But just because it has lots of pictures and capes doesn't mean it can't be thoughtful and deep.

#17 Posted by NiKva (94 posts) - - Show Bio

@roboadmiral said:

@NiKva said:

They could be, but they shouldn't. Just like literary analyzing, people will dissect the literature until they stray entirely off the author's message.

What? The entire point of the dissection is to get to the core of the matter. So what you're saying is that we shouldn't take a deeper look into written works or think critically about them because that might make us miss the point? How does that make any sense?

To answer the initial question. Yes, yes you should. That is half the fun. Think about it, roll around in it, but only as much as you want to. If you're just here to watch guys in tights fly around and shoot lasers at each other, that's cool too. But just because it has lots of pictures and capes doesn't mean it can't be thoughtful and deep.

I'm talking about literary "experts" who over-analyze every last detail, bringing up assumptions like "he was probably molested as a child" or crap like that which has nothing to do with the story, nor does the author even explicitly hint that idea.

#18 Posted by KnightRise (4762 posts) - - Show Bio

Absolutely. They're literature.

#19 Edited by TheVoiceOfReason (747 posts) - - Show Bio

Not really, there is no purpose or benefits in analyzing Literature. We should focus more on Math and Sciences.

#20 Posted by Rabbitearsblog (6028 posts) - - Show Bio

@xybernauts said:

I think the analysis of comics is what makes comics fun. Usually, the comics that aren't worth analyzing lack depth and thus aren't worth reading.

I basically agree with this!

As for whether or not comics should be analyzed, yes, I definitely think that comics should be analyzed. Some of the best comic book stories have plot lines where the character thinks about how they live their lives and some of the best stories that can be easily analyzed would be:

Batman: The Killing Joke - You can talk about how Batman and the Joker view life so differently after they both lost their loved ones and this story does a fantastic job of showing both sides of their stories.

Joss Whedon's run on Astonishing X-Men - Probably the story that I think people can easily discuss about was the third volume Torn where Emma Frost seems to have survivor's guilt. You can discuss about how people who had survived a tragic event deal with their lives afterwards.

God Loves, Man Kills - This story is basically stating how racism and prejudice can be used in a dangerous way. This would be a good discussion on how racism and prejudice affected society over the years.

#21 Posted by dondave (38889 posts) - - Show Bio

Yes

#22 Posted by NewComicGuy (131 posts) - - Show Bio

I think you find the answer to this question on these boards every day. We are consistently analyzing these books in one form or another. So yes, they should be open for analysis. These boards wouldn't thrive like they do if this wasn't the case.

#23 Posted by Rabbitearsblog (6028 posts) - - Show Bio

@NewComicGuy said:

I think you find the answer to this question on these boards every day. We are consistently analyzing these books in one form or another. So yes, they should be open for analysis. These boards wouldn't thrive like they do if this wasn't the case.

Definitely agree with this!

#24 Posted by John Valentine (16335 posts) - - Show Bio

That's what makes comics fun!

#25 Posted by NeonGameWave (9015 posts) - - Show Bio

Yes, because we find something new and interesting.

#26 Posted by Decoy Elite (29923 posts) - - Show Bio

Heck yeah, I love looking into what makes a comic tick and what the author was trying to explore with their story.