#1 Posted by Veshark (9058 posts) - - Show Bio

One pattern I've noticed is that, in recent years, DC's comics seem to be more traditional superhero fare (Blackest Night, Throne of Atlantis), while Marvel tries to be more grounded and present real-world allegories (e.g. Civil War, Fear Itself).

But funnily enough, their adaptations in other media are the complete opposite. DC's adaptations seem to be more serious (BTAS, Young Justice, The Dark Knight Trilogy, Man of Steel), while Marvel's adaptations embrace the fun part of superheroes (Avengers Earth's Mightiest Heroes, Ultimate Spider-Man, the Marvel Cinematic Universe).

Of course, there are exceptions on both sides, but I'd like to hear what you guys think about this. Has anyone ever noticed this before?

#2 Posted by CastleEcho (7 posts) - - Show Bio

Totally agree, great analysis man! I hadn't even noticed this before.

#3 Posted by akbogert (3227 posts) - - Show Bio

Hadn't noticed, but very much true.

#4 Posted by lightsout (1831 posts) - - Show Bio

I think the comic-differences is something that's been widely "accepted" (with exceptions as you said, since Kingdom Come from DC is close enough to Civil War's themes of super-heroic accountability), but I actually never thought of the cartoon/movie comparison until you said it. Very good observation.

Although, I might argue that their animations/movies may be more serious, but still based on the classic-superheroics** -- the Batman ones already lend towards "realism", character introspection, etc (since those themes are already present in Batman, we'll have to wait until MoS comes out to see how much it follows that path).

**That is, they haven't done things like tackle discrimination (the way X-men does), and still pretty much have the stronger black-&-white distinction of what's good/just & what's not that DC is known for (where Marvel, or at least the personalities of their characters, have more shades of gray).

#5 Posted by Veshark (9058 posts) - - Show Bio

Thanks, everyone.

@lightsout said:

I think the comic-differences is something that's been widely "accepted" (with exceptions as you said, since Kingdom Come from DC is close enough to Civil War's themes of super-heroic accountability), but I actually never thought of the cartoon/movie comparison until you said it. Very good observation.

Although, I might argue that their animations/movies may be more serious, but still based on the classic-superheroics** -- the Batman ones already lend towards "realism", character introspection, etc (since those themes are already present in Batman, we'll have to wait until MoS comes out to see how much it follows that path).

**That is, they haven't done things like tackle discrimination (the way X-men does), and still pretty much have the stronger black-&-white distinction of what's good/just & what's not that DC is known for (where Marvel, or at least the personalities of their characters, have more shades of gray).

Yeah, definitely, I guess it's pretty widely-accepted in comics. I mean, just look at Hickman's Avengers and Johns' Justice League. The former's an epic, serious and stoic superhero team book while the latter's a more traditional superhero blockbuster.

I suppose some margin of superheroics have to be allowed with anything by DC and Marvel. But when I say serious, I don't so much mean 'realism' as I do 'serious in tone'. As in there's a less 'fun adventure' vibe and a more 'this is a serious job' sort of thing. Of course, there are noted exceptions, but that's how it comes off to me.

But yeah, good point about Marvel's characters being less morally black-and-white. Which makes the comparison even more layered now O_o

#6 Posted by sagejonathan (2013 posts) - - Show Bio

When I think of Marvel about almost anything, I think people with super powers.

When I think DC about almost anything, I think superheroes.

Even through all their cartoons and movies, no matter how they are made, this stays true to me for the most part.