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Edited by dshipp17

@dmessmer said:

@dshipp17 said:

No, it’s not chauvinistic to think that a woman should get into a relationship to heal a man's psychological wounds.

Yes, it is. You're essentially saying that Wonder Woman's attraction to Dr. Psycho would be based on what she could offer him, not on what he could offer her. Dr. Psycho, too, is inherently chauvinistic. Whatever the reason, hating women as a category is chauvinistic. In fact, that is the definition of chauvinism.

Sure, people change and people can come to rethink their opinion of someone. But the notion a woman could be attracted to a man if she just understands him enough is a fiction that we tell ourselves when someone we like doesn't return the affection. If, as they get to know each other better they are to end up together, then Dr. Psycho would still have to have some traits that would inspire attraction in her, and I still haven't heard a compelling reason that she would want to be with him. In what way would he make her life better? How would he bring her happiness? What traits, unique to him, would she find attractive? Why would she choose him over any other man? So far your argument rests on the idea that if she just got to know him well enough she'd realize everything she had to offer him and would then want to be with him. That's a great male fantasy, but it's a fiction; a sexist fiction.

For example, though I don't like the Wonder Woman/Superman pairing, there are some reasons it could make sense: he would understand the weight of responsibility that comes with his powers, and he could relate to her struggle to be a source for good without becoming an overbearing tyrant. Those are things that she probably can't find anywhere else, so Superman has something tangible to offer her that would make her life better - she would have a sympathetic and knowing ear that no one else could provide. He has also traditionally fought for those in need, as has she, so they have shared values. There are reasons to believe that being with him could improve her life, hence her attraction.

Those are some good questions. But, actually, I cannot really answer them, because we really don’t know Dr. Psycho in that level of detail. What I mean by that, is we start in a process of Dr. Psycho’s development, at the end point of where lots of taunts and teasing by women has caused Dr. Psycho to go on a direction in life, where he’s seeking revenge against the people who wounded him psychologically, as his origin. The real Dr. Psycho would have been that person that was being hurt like 1 minute earlier, extending back to his birth. We have no data on that person. We only know all of the stuff he did and said on his personal quest for revenge. And, with that said, since he does not have a large body count behind him, I’ve been able to empathize with him some (e.g. he’s only known to have been responsible for the death of a guy name Bradley, someone who started by teasing him and getting him jailed for life, after having framed him); if Dr. Psycho were also killing women in his path for revenge, or, even chronically stealing from others, than Dr. Psycho would have been just another villain to me, probably obscure. But, given that he actually made it to and through a university, I can guess that the Dr. Psycho underneath was very disciplined, into his books, and avoided confrontation; his problem is that he internalized confrontation to an unhealthy degree from a distance and did not seek help. Thus, the real Dr. Psycho would likely have the ability to prioritize himself and be self-disciplined in common with Wonder Woman. Thus, breaking through the act, after a process of getting to know Dr. Psycho, would begin to reveal those positive attributes about Dr. Psycho, as well as others. Being able to make it through a university, Dr. Psycho clearly had some unknown positive attributes. He’s clearly emotional, smart, innovative, and a determined individual. Actually, if you think about it, it’s kind of a positive attribute that he did not form his perspective about women before getting through a university program.

I can see from our conversation that you have strong feelings against a man who takes the opportunity to control a woman who he knows and someone who looks for initial traits that might signal a man who has certain traits in common with an abusive man; in other wards, you look to create trouble for a guy who’s trying to get into a romantic relationship with a woman, most often in those situation that involves women who you know, possibly. In this way, you want to give the impression that you’re against a patriartical class structure. But, mainly, even though you’d probably deny it, you’re first and foremost against the idea of a man with problems with his looks (maybe or maybe not height) somehow ending up with an ideal woman such as Wonder Woman. And that’s normal and is probably common among men, particularly those who are jocks and the center of attention that believe that they are only entitled to such women. Being against men who abuse the women in their lives is a good thing. I think you’ve associated me with someone who’s come into contact with women who didn’t return his affections. I can say you’re right about that to a degree and wrong about that to a degree. However, that still does not negate trying to get to know someone versus trying not to know someone based on first impressions. And again, we’re not talking about the average Jane, but a woman who’s said to have lots of noble traits. While you have that preference of thinking, I can point out that I’m puzzled by what Marge Simpson found attractive about Homer Simpson, and I can ask in what way did Homer make Marge’s life better? Being very nice, Homer appears to have been clumsy, undisciplined, and stupid, as an initial matter, and what did Marge see in him? Marge is the complete opposite of those things. As an initial matter, how would Homer have brought Marge happiness by appearing to be clumsy, undisciplined, and stupid? What traits, unique to Homer, does Marge find attractive? As an initial matter, why would Marge have chosen a man who is clumsy, undisciplined, and stupid over any other man, or the prince charming, that girls probably already have in their minds about men? Clearly, though, although it’s a mystery for me, Marge Simpson is with Homer Simpson and is happy or content in that relationship. Seems that the process of getting to know someone is a little more complicated than it seems.

Posted by dmessmer

@dmessmer: Dude, don't argue with this guy. I'm pretty sure he's a troll. Looking at his comment history, he mostly just writes about how great Dr. Psycho could be and how he should be in a relationship with WW. It's a gimmick.

Thanks for the heads up.