#1 Posted by imagine727 (105 posts) - - Show Bio

I am quite interested in greek mythology, and their are a few match ups I'd like to hear your opinion on: 
1. Zeus vs Kronos 
2.Poseidon vs Atlas 
3.Hades vs Krios 
4. Zeus vs Poseidon 
5. Ketos vs Typhon 
6. Kampe vs Hercules 
7.Cyclops vs Minotaur

#2 Posted by ShootingNova (18956 posts) - - Show Bio

I'm assuming this is them in their prime?

1. Zeus definitely wins. Absolute stomp if it's Orphic, otherwise massive victory for Hesiod's.

2. Atlas has him in strength, overall, I suppose Poseidon is superior.

3. Hades should win, especially if its in his realm. Crius really lacks feats.

4. Zeus, for sure. He could solo the Olympians. If this is Orphic, absolute murder stomp.

5. A massive stomp for Typhon. No other monster is as powerful as him.

6. I'm going for Kampe, but Heracles/Herakles (Hercules is Roman) has better showings. However, she was thought to be a female counterpart of Typhon.

7. Cyclops. Too much strength and durability. Neither of these have superb intellect, but Cyclops are superior in the mind as far as I know.

#3 Edited by Betatesthighlander1 (7498 posts) - - Show Bio

Zeus

Atlas

Hades

Zeus

Typhon

Hercules

Cyclops

#4 Edited by Epicbeast3000 (956 posts) - - Show Bio

Zeus

Poiseidon

hades

zeus

typhon( the only being able to rival zeus)

Kampe gaurded the elder cyclops, who were a huge factor in winning the titanomachy

cyclops

#5 Posted by schillenger420 (821 posts) - - Show Bio

Thanks for the fight.... you made me look some stuff up and I actually learned a thing....:>)

Anyway

1. Zeus takes this. He beat him once, he'll beat him again.

2. Poseidon wins this.... He's a God, Atlas isn't

3. Hades takes this. Upon research Krios is already in Tartarus so Hades has essentially been beating him for eons.... nothing really new here.

4. Again Zeus. There's a reason why he's the Head of the Gods and Poseidon isn't.

5. Ketos.... essentially the Kracken from Clash of the Titans versus this thing:

Typhon was described in pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheke, as the largest and most fearsome of all creatures. His human upper half reached as high as the stars, and his hands reached east and west. Instead of a human head, a hundred dragon heads erupted from his neck and shoulders (some, however, depict him as having a human head, with the dragon heads replacing the fingers on his hands). His bottom half consisted of gigantic viper coils that could reach the top of his head when stretched out and constantly made a hissing noise. His whole body was covered in wings, and fire flashed from his eyes, striking fear even into the Olympians.

Typhon attempts to destroy Zeus at the will of Gaia, because Zeus had imprisoned the Titans. Typhon overcomes Zeus in their first battle, and tears out Zeus' sinews. However, Hermes recovers the sinews and restores them to Zeus. Typhon is finally defeated by Zeus, who traps him underneath Mount Etna.

I gotta Give it to Typhon no contest...

6. This other thing: Campe (or Kampe) is generally depicted as being centaurine in form, her lower part being that of a dragon, with a scorpion's tail, snakes around her ankles, 50 grizzly heads of various creatures (wolves, bears, lions...) bubbling around her waist. She also carried two scimitars, had snake hair, and possessed wings on her dragon back. More rare depictions describe her as holding a scythe, being serpentine from the waist down with a scorpion's tail with snake hair and three animal heads around the waist with wings on her shoulders.[citation needed]

Vs. Hercules..... I'm going Hercules. For whatever reason... call it faith, stupidity or whatever that's what i'm going with.

7. I'm going Cyclops. They at least had to hunt down their food where the Minotaur was always just given sacrifices, making him slow and whatever skills he may have dull.

#6 Posted by VercingetorixTheGreat (2823 posts) - - Show Bio

Didn't Zeus need the help of Poseidon and Hades to beat Kronos and then only because they snuck up on him?

#7 Edited by hsm1 (55 posts) - - Show Bio

2. Poseidon wins this.... He's a God, Atlas isn't

Atlas is a Titan. Titans, being descendants of Gaia and Ouranos, are a generation older than the pantheon of Greek Gods. They were also more powerful than the gods.

#8 Posted by schillenger420 (821 posts) - - Show Bio

@hsm1: Yet they got beat..... Atlas has been holding up the earth for awhile.... he's gotta be sore after that... kinda stiff. Poseidon's been swimming the whole time, actually been in a battle or two. I don't see how Atlas takes this.

#9 Edited by hsm1 (55 posts) - - Show Bio

@hsm1: Yet they got beat...

In the context of this battle, the events of the Titanomachy are irrelevant.

#10 Posted by schillenger420 (821 posts) - - Show Bio

@hsm1:

I don't really know what to say to that. Poseidon's powers stem from him being Lord of the Sea's. He only got those powers after the God's over-threw the Titans. Without his God status, (and by extension all of the Greek God's "God" status) than they wouldn't really stand a chance 1v1. The op didn't state any particular limitations so there's no reason to believe the evens of the Titanomachy are irrelevant as those events through the combined efforts of the Gods made them what they were. Without those events this turns into a spite thread pretty quick.

#11 Posted by hsm1 (55 posts) - - Show Bio

@hsm1:

I don't really know what to say to that. Poseidon's powers stem from him being Lord of the Sea's. He only got those powers after the God's over-threw the Titans. Without his God status, (and by extension all of the Greek God's "God" status) than they wouldn't really stand a chance 1v1. The op didn't state any particular limitations so there's no reason to believe the evens of the Titanomachy are irrelevant as those events through the combined efforts of the Gods made them what they were. Without those events this turns into a spite thread pretty quick.

Poseidon's powers do not stem from being God of the Sea's. He was born with his power, the sea was just the domain he was granted to rule after the Titanomachy. The reason why I said the Titanomachy is irrelevant is because it's similar to PIS in comic books. The Titanomachy is a allegorical tale to celebrate Troy's victory in the Persian Wars.

#12 Edited by rolldestroyer (3508 posts) - - Show Bio

Thanks for the fight.... you made me look some stuff up and I actually learned a thing....:>)

Anyway

1. Zeus takes this. He beat him once, he'll beat him again.

2. Poseidon wins this.... He's a God, Atlas isn't

3. Hades takes this. Upon research Krios is already in Tartarus so Hades has essentially been beating him for eons.... nothing really new here.

4. Again Zeus. There's a reason why he's the Head of the Gods and Poseidon isn't.

5. Ketos.... essentially the Kracken from Clash of the Titans versus this thing:

Typhon was described in pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheke, as the largest and most fearsome of all creatures. His human upper half reached as high as the stars, and his hands reached east and west. Instead of a human head, a hundred dragon heads erupted from his neck and shoulders (some, however, depict him as having a human head, with the dragon heads replacing the fingers on his hands). His bottom half consisted of gigantic viper coils that could reach the top of his head when stretched out and constantly made a hissing noise. His whole body was covered in wings, and fire flashed from his eyes, striking fear even into the Olympians.

Typhon attempts to destroy Zeus at the will of Gaia, because Zeus had imprisoned the Titans. Typhon overcomes Zeus in their first battle, and tears out Zeus' sinews. However, Hermes recovers the sinews and restores them to Zeus. Typhon is finally defeated by Zeus, who traps him underneath Mount Etna.

I gotta Give it to Typhon no contest...

6. This other thing: Campe (or Kampe) is generally depicted as being centaurine in form, her lower part being that of a dragon, with a scorpion's tail, snakes around her ankles, 50 grizzly heads of various creatures (wolves, bears, lions...) bubbling around her waist. She also carried two scimitars, had snake hair, and possessed wings on her dragon back. More rare depictions describe her as holding a scythe, being serpentine from the waist down with a scorpion's tail with snake hair and three animal heads around the waist with wings on her shoulders.[citation needed]

Vs. Hercules..... I'm going Hercules. For whatever reason... call it faith, stupidity or whatever that's what i'm going with.

7. I'm going Cyclops. They at least had to hunt down their food where the Minotaur was always just given sacrifices, making him slow and whatever skills he may have dull.

i disagree with most of your post.

1. Zeus didn't beat kronos in a straight up fight, if Zeus could have beaten him he wouldn't have asked the help of the cyclops and hecatoncheires in the first place.

2. Atlas is a god, it's just that the parents of the gods (or olympians) are called titans, and atlas is much stronger than poseidon

3. This has nothing to do with that, the titans are imprisoned in tartarus because of the combined efforts of the olympians, cyclops and hecatoncheires

4. depends between homer and hesoid.

5. he has nothing to do with kraken from clash of the titans who is a made up character. Though i agree, typhon wins

6. From what i recall, kampe is the monster that was guarding the tartarus when the cyclops were inside, and it took Zeus to defeat this monster (and then free the cyclops and the cyclops returned the favor by forging lightning bolts for zeus, trident for poseidon and the helmet for hades, hence they won the war) i doubt hercules is going to take it down.

7. Minotaur was beaten by a demig-god who's weaker than hercules (can't recall exactly whom but i think it was theseus), i agree that cyclops stomp.

#13 Edited by ShootingNova (18956 posts) - - Show Bio

LOL, another bump.

@schillenger420 said:

1. Zeus takes this. He beat him once, he'll beat him again.

Zeus is generally shown as more powerful, however, aside from in Pelasgianism and Orphism, Zeus never single-handedly defeated Kronos (in part due to the fact that he was not yet at the prime of his powers). Later, Zeus released Kronos from Tartarus and made him the King of the Isle of the Blessed, and so forth, secure in the fact that his power was not going to be challenged. So I guess Zeus does win.

2. Poseidon wins this.... He's a God, Atlas isn't

Atlas is a god. He was a Titan, and therefore from a race of deities preceding the Olympians. The Titans are essentially Elder Gods.

3. Hades takes this. Upon research Krios is already in Tartarus so Hades has essentially been beating him for eons.... nothing really new here.

Krios being in Tartarus is not a valid reason for Hades winning. Hades =/= Tartarus, Hades is simply to make sure that they can't leave Tartarus, but they really can't (in some myths, Tartarus was an infinite void, and then again Poseidon had fixed bronze gates upon it as well). The reason why Hades wins is because Krios is lacking in feats, but so is Hades, just not to Krios's extent.

5. Ketos.... essentially the Kracken from Clash of the Titans versus this thing:

Typhon was described in pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheke, as the largest and most fearsome of all creatures. His human upper half reached as high as the stars, and his hands reached east and west. Instead of a human head, a hundred dragon heads erupted from his neck and shoulders (some, however, depict him as having a human head, with the dragon heads replacing the fingers on his hands). His bottom half consisted of gigantic viper coils that could reach the top of his head when stretched out and constantly made a hissing noise. His whole body was covered in wings, and fire flashed from his eyes, striking fear even into the Olympians.

Typhon attempts to destroy Zeus at the will of Gaia, because Zeus had imprisoned the Titans. Typhon overcomes Zeus in their first battle, and tears out Zeus' sinews. However, Hermes recovers the sinews and restores them to Zeus. Typhon is finally defeated by Zeus, who traps him underneath Mount Etna.

I gotta Give it to Typhon no contest...

This depends. According to Hesiod's Theogony, Zeus simply banished Typhon to Tartarus and was done with it, while other versions presented that difficulty you mentioned:

In the Theogony Zeus has a relatively easy time of it: the shock and awe of his thunderbolts are sufficient to hurl Typhoeus down to Tartaros, where he becomes responsible for fierce rain-blowing winds. However, the conflict is more intense and difficult in other versions , where the Olympian gods metamorphose themselves into animals and flee to Egypt. Zeus stands his ground, though, and using thunderbolts and an adamant sickle he forces Typhoeus to flee, and gives chase as far as Mount Casius, near the mouth of the River Orontes in Syria. There the two engage in hand-to-hand combat. Typhoeus grips Zeus in his snaky coils, wrenches the sickle from his grasp, and severs the sinews of his hands and feet. He then carries the helpless god through the sea to Cilicia, dumps him in the Corycian cave, hides the sinews in a bearskin, and assigns the semi-bestial she-dragon Delphyne to guard them.

However, Hermes and Aigipan ('Goat Pan') are able to steal the sinews and secretly reinstall them into Zeus. Duly revived, he takes the offensives and showers Typhoeus with thunderbolts from a chariot of winged horses. Typhoeus flees to Mount Nysa, where the Fates trick him into tasting ephemeral fruits by saying they will strengthen him, and further pursuit sees the protagonists arrive at Mount Haimos in Thrace, where Typhoeus hurls mountains which Zeus blasts back with thunderbolts. A stream of blood gushes from Mount Haimos, 'the Bloody Mountain' (Greek haima, 'blood'), and when Typhoeus finally tries to escape via the Sicilian sea, Zeus heaves Mount Etna on top of him.

-- Taken from The Greek Myths: Gods, Monsters, Heroes and the Origins of Storytelling

Note that Typhon was forced to flee against Zeus's thunderbolts virtually every time, he was able to grip Zeus in his coils and tear his sinews with his own sickle because it was a hand-to-hand fight, but regardless, terrifying the other Olympians to the extent for making them all flee instantly is impressive.

6. This other thing: Campe (or Kampe) is generally depicted as being centaurine in form, her lower part being that of a dragon, with a scorpion's tail, snakes around her ankles, 50 grizzly heads of various creatures (wolves, bears, lions...) bubbling around her waist. She also carried two scimitars, had snake hair, and possessed wings on her dragon back. More rare depictions describe her as holding a scythe, being serpentine from the waist down with a scorpion's tail with snake hair and three animal heads around the waist with wings on her shoulders.

LOL, so you're quoting from Wikipedia, a source that can be edited, and you also quoted something that doesn't really make a difference to this fight.

Although Kampe stood guard within Tartarus, she had no feats aside from being slain by Zeus, and seeing how the heroic Hercules (or rather, Heracles) is often depicted as defying nature itself, it is plausible that the wins this fight.

Didn't Zeus need the help of Poseidon and Hades to beat Kronos and then only because they snuck up on him?

A ten-year war doesn't sound like sneaking up on somebody.

I don't really know what to say to that. Poseidon's powers stem from him being Lord of the Sea's. He only got those powers after the God's over-threw the Titans. Without his God status, (and by extension all of the Greek God's "God" status) than they wouldn't really stand a chance 1v1. The op didn't state any particular limitations so there's no reason to believe the evens of the Titanomachy are irrelevant as those events through the combined efforts of the Gods made them what they were. Without those events this turns into a spite thread pretty quick.

Poseidon's powers never stemmed from commanding the seas. Ruling the seas gave him power over those that resided in it, but he wasn't powerless prior to the Titanomachy.

#14 Posted by ShootingNova (18956 posts) - - Show Bio

@rolldestroyer: Zeus required the aid of the Cyclopes, Hekatonkheires and his siblings against not just Kronos, but the entire Titan race, because on average, Titans > Olympians (its mainly because Zeus (prime) > any Titan).

6. From what i recall, kampe is the monster that was guarding the tartarus when the cyclops were inside, and it took Zeus to defeat this monster (and then free the cyclops and the cyclops returned the favor by forging lightning bolts for zeus, trident for poseidon and the helmet for hades, hence they won the war) i doubt hercules is going to take it down

Guarding them because they had been hurled into an infinite abyss or something of nearly that scale isn't worth a whole lot. Considering she is actually featless (Zeus beat her before his prime and even before the Titanomachy, when he too was virtually featless), while Heracles is commonly depicted as defying nature, I would say he has a chance.

#15 Posted by rolldestroyer (3508 posts) - - Show Bio

@shootingnova:

yes, i know that he sought aid not to go just against kronos but to win the titanomachy.

however, i dont see any indication as to why Zeus is more powerful than kronos, since they never went against each other 1 on 1.

Zeus was still powerful even before he won the war, and seeing how he struggled against the beast, i would say that kampe is more powerful than hercules by quite a margin.

#16 Posted by ShootingNova (18956 posts) - - Show Bio

@rolldestroyer: He was featless prior to the war. Why is Zeus in his prime > Kronos? Well, he was certainly secure in his belief that Kronos was no threat to his power when he released him from Tartarus and made him the King of the Isle of the Blessed. But really, you should have a look at this:

He then freed his father's brothers, whom Uranus had chained. In token of gratitude, they offered him thunder and lightning. Furnished with such weapons, Zeus can thenceforth command "both mortals and immortals" (Theog. 493-506).

-- Taken from A History of Religious Ideas Vol. 1

In the Theogony Zeus has a relatively easy time of it: the shock and awe of his thunderbolts are sufficient to hurl Typhoeus down to Tartaros, where he becomes responsible for fierce rain-blowing winds. However, the conflict is more intense and difficult in other versions , where the Olympian gods metamorphose themselves into animals and flee to Egypt. Zeus stands his ground, though, and using thunderbolts and an adamant sickle he forces Typhoeus to flee, and gives chase as far as Mount Casius, near the mouth of the River Orontes in Syria. There the two engage in hand-to-hand combat. Typhoeus grips Zeus in his snaky coils, wrenches the sickle from his grasp, and severs the sinews of his hands and feet. He then carries the helpless god through the sea to Cilicia, dumps him in the Corycian cave, hides the sinews in a bearskin, and assigns the semi-bestial she-dragon Delphyne to guard them.

However, Hermes and Aigipan ('Goat Pan') are able to steal the sinews and secretly reinstall them into Zeus. Duly revived, he takes the offensives and showers Typhoeus with thunderbolts from a chariot of winged horses. Typhoeus flees to Mount Nysa, where the Fates trick him into tasting ephemeral fruits by saying they will strengthen him, and further pursuit sees the protagonists arrive at Mount Haimos in Thrace, where Typhoeus hurls mountains which Zeus blasts back with thunderbolts. A stream of blood gushes from Mount Haimos, 'the Bloody Mountain' (Greek haima, 'blood'), and when Typhoeus finally tries to escape via the Sicilian sea, Zeus heaves Mount Etna on top of him.

-- Taken from The Greek Myths: Gods, Monsters, Heroes and the Origins of Storytelling

It is not possible either to trick or escape the mind of Zeus. - Hesiod (C.Eight Century B.C.), Theogony)

-- Taken from Classical Mythology: Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

For already in Homer Zeus recovers the splendors and powers of a true Indo-European sovereign god. He is more than a god of the "vast sky," he is "the father of gods and men" (Iliad 1.544). And in a fragment of his Heliades (frag. 70 Nauck), Aeschylus proclaims: "Zeus is the ether, Zeus is the earth, Zeus is the sky. Yes, Zeus is all that is above all."

-- Taken from A History of Religious Ideas Vol. 1

Zeus is the air, Zeus the earth, Zeus all things and what transcends them all. - Aeschylus (525 B.C. - 456 B.C.), Fragments

-- Taken from Classical Mythology: Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

But Zeus is more than just a sky god: he is the head of the gods who live on Mount Olympos (the 'Olympian Gods'), and his powers are nicely detailed in a fragment of Aiskhylos (Aeschylus):

Zeus is the air, Zeus earth, and Zeus the sky, Zeus everything and all that's more than these.

-- Taken from The Greek Myths: Gods, Monsters, Heroes and the Origins of Storytelling

Consciousness of his omnipotence is admirably illustrated in the famous scene in the Iliad (8.17 ff.) in which Zeus makes this challenge to the Olympians: "Then [you] will see how far I am strongest of all the immortals. Come, you gods, make this endeavor, that you all may learn this. Let down out of the sky a cord of gold; lay hold of it all you who are gods and all who are goddesses, yet not even so can you drag down Zeus from the sky to the ground, not Zeus the high lord of counsel, though you try until you grow weary. Yet whenever I might strongly be minded to pull you, I could drag you up, earth and all and sea and all with you, then fetch the golden rope about the horn of Olympos and make it fast, so that all once more should dangle in mid air. So much stronger am I than the gods, and stronger than mortals" (trans. Richmond Lattimore, The Iliad of Homer [Chicago, 1951]).

-- Taken from A History of Religious Ideas Vol. 1

[253] And now his thunder bolts would Jove wide scatter, but he feared the flames, unnumbered, sacred ether might ignite and burn the axle of the universe: and he remembered in the scroll of fate, there is a time appointed when the sea and earth and Heavens shall melt, and fire destroy the universe of mighty labour wrought. Such weapons by the skill of Cyclops forged, for different punishment he laid aside—for straightway he preferred to overwhelm the mortal race beneath deep waves and storms from every raining sky.

-- Taken from Metmorhoses Book 1

"So then, [Zeus] by engulfing Erikepaios the Firstborn [Phanes], he had the body of all things in his belly, and he mixed into his own limbs the god’s power and strength. Because of this, together with him, everything came to be again inside Zeus, the broad air and the lofty splendour of heaven, the undraining sea and earth’s glorious seat, great Okeanos and the lowest Tartara of the earth, rivers and boundless sea and everything else, and all the immortal blessed gods and goddesses, all that had existed and all that was to exist afterwards became one and grew together in the belly of Zeus. After he had hidden them all away, again into the glad light from his holy heart he brought them up, performing mighty acts."

-- Taken from Orphica, Rhapsodies Fragment 167

#17 Posted by rolldestroyer (3508 posts) - - Show Bio

@shootingnova:

IIRC though, when released, kronos had no intention of even harming Zeus, and of course Zeus would not fear him, since he has the olympians, cyclops, and all other creatures backing him up, so releasing one titan, even if that titan is the most powerful (kronos), shouldn't be a real threat to Zeus.

as to your citations, i guess you do have a fair point, though clearly, you are using different versions of him (as in different writers), nonetheless, they are more impressive than anything kronos had done.

#18 Posted by VercingetorixTheGreat (2823 posts) - - Show Bio

@shootingnova: After releasing his brothers, Zeus led a war against Cronus and the other Titans. The war went on for ten years when Zeus, Poseidon & Hades released the Cyclopes from captivity. In gratitude, the Cyclopes gave each of the brothers a weapon. Poseidon received a trident, Zeus a thunderbolt, and Hades a helmet of darkness. They used these gifts to finally defeat Cronus and the rest of the titans.

I doubt Zeus can beat Cronos by himself

#19 Posted by ShootingNova (18956 posts) - - Show Bio

IIRC though, when released, kronos had no intention of even harming Zeus, and of course Zeus would not fear him, since he has the olympians, cyclops, and all other creatures backing him up, so releasing one titan, even if that titan is the most powerful (kronos), shouldn't be a real threat to Zeus.

as to your citations, i guess you do have a fair point, though clearly, you are using different versions of him (as in different writers), nonetheless, they are more impressive than anything kronos had done.

What are you saying? Kronos had every intention of harming Zeus, in order to secure his power. Again, Zeus was not in his prime during the Titanomachy, Kronos was. When he was in his prime, Zeus was confident Kronos could not pose a threat to his power, and so released him from Tartarus and made him the King of the Isle of the Blessed.

Again, what are you on about? Different versions of Zeus from different mythologies, and so what? The versions of Kronos in all those myths are inferior to Zeus. That's all.

After releasing his brothers, Zeus led a war against Cronus and the other Titans. The war went on for ten years when Zeus, Poseidon & Hades released the Cyclopes from captivity. In gratitude, the Cyclopes gave each of the brothers a weapon. Poseidon received a trident, Zeus a thunderbolt, and Hades a helmet of darkness. They used these gifts to finally defeat Cronus and the rest of the titans.

I doubt Zeus can beat Cronos by himself

Is this Wikipedia? Regardless, I don't see how you have posted anything I don't know or anything that actually disproves my point. Zeus was not in his prime during the Titanomachy while Kronos was, so yes, at that period, Kronos > Zeus (minus Pelasgianism and Orphism). In their primes in EVERY myth, Zeus > Kronos.

#20 Posted by rolldestroyer (3508 posts) - - Show Bio

@shootingnova:

he took pity on kronos, which is why he released him, and i already agreed that Zeus didn't see kronos as a threat, but you ignored my most important point: When Zeus released Kronos, he was backed by the cyclops, olympians, and other creatures along with some titans (who joined his side in the war) so of course, Kronos wouldn't dare singlehandedly attack Zeus while he has that kind of reinforcements.

#21 Posted by ShootingNova (18956 posts) - - Show Bio

@rolldestroyer: No, you're just being completely incorrect. Zeus had the Hekatonkheires and Cyclops during the war of the Titanomachy, when he banished Kronos.

Years later (presumably), when he released him, there is no mention of the Cyclops and Hekatonkheires and there isn't meant to be. Stop making up information.

#22 Posted by rolldestroyer (3508 posts) - - Show Bio

@rolldestroyer: No, you're just being completely incorrect. Zeus had the Hekatonkheires and Cyclops during the war of the Titanomachy, when he banished Kronos.

Years later (presumably), when he released him, there is no mention of the Cyclops and Hekatonkheires and there isn't meant to be. Stop making up information.

im not making the information up, im using logic, when zeus usurped kronos he had the supreme authority over all, and if he wanted the help from cyclops he would have gotten it since kronos was the one who put cyclops in tartarus in the first place, so now you're going to tell me that if zeus (who helped them escape) asked them for help to go against kronos (who imprisoned them), they're going to refuse? does this sound illogical to you?

but ill play ball, let's say we put the cyclops and hekatonkheries aside, Zeus still has the olympians and some titans backing him up, would you say kronos would unleash a one-titan war against all the olympians and the other titans who are helping zeus?

#23 Edited by ShootingNova (18956 posts) - - Show Bio

@rolldestroyer: You had lost me posts ago. Zeus freeing Kronos from Tartarus was years after the war, there was no mention of outside aid, so until you can give me the quote, I'd say you're either incredibly behind on what I'm saying, or just trolling.

When Zeus usurped Kronos's power by means of a war, he did not have supreme authority (in fact, Kronos was the closest one to that position), he had help from the Cyclops and Hekatonkheires and Olympians (plus a few Titans). Years later, when he released Kronos from Tartarus, there is no mention of anybody aiding him, and that is not against logic since by then he had both the power and the right to do so alone.

Kronos wasn't alone in his war, and yes, he was fighting to kill Zeus & co. He attempted to kill them all when they were born, he cared for power over his family.

In Pelasgianism and Orphism, Zeus is easily above Kronos.

#24 Edited by rolldestroyer (3508 posts) - - Show Bio

@shootingnova said:

@rolldestroyer: You had lost me posts ago. Zeus freeing Kronos from Tartarus was years after the war, there was no mention of outside aid, so until you can give me the quote, I'd say you're either incredibly behind on what I'm saying, or just trolling.

When Zeus usurped Kronos's power by means of a war, he did not have supreme authority (in fact, Kronos was the closest one to that position), he had help from the Cyclops and Hekatonkheires and Olympians (plus a few Titans). Years later, when he released Kronos from Tartarus, there is no mention of anybody aiding him, and that is not against logic since by then he had both the power and the right to do so alone.

Kronos wasn't alone in his war, and yes, he was fighting to kill Zeus & co. He attempted to kill them all when they were born, he cared for power over his family.

In Pelasgianism and Orphism, Zeus is easily above Kronos.

well, if you're not even understanding what im saying dont make any accusations.

i never mentioned anything before the war, let me make it more simpler:

Zeus freed Kronos right? so at this point Kronos is the only freed titan right? so tell me, would Kronos (alone) attack Zeus who is backed by the olympians and some titans (like prometheus and epimetheus)? he'd be over-numbered.