#1 Edited by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

Here we can discuss everything Batman comics related!

#2 Edited by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

COMICS: Preview 'BATMAN ANNUAL #2'

Batman Annual #2

Written by SCOTT SNYDER

Art by AARON LOPRESTI

Cover by JOCK

On sale JULY 31 • 48 pg, FC, $4.99 US • RATED T

A special ZERO YEAR tie-in! Bruce Wayne’s first year as the Dark Knight has just barely begun…and already dangerous elements are coalescing, leading Bruce toward his final destiny.

#3 Edited by lifeofvibe (3509 posts) - - Show Bio
#4 Posted by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

@lifeofvibe: It's a "Zero-Year" tie in,so,i think Snyder wanted to make the costume like he had it during his first year!

#5 Edited by ULTRAstarkiller (6249 posts) - - Show Bio

looks cool

#6 Edited by Jayc1324 (12796 posts) - - Show Bio

My favorite series so far has been batman inc

Online
#7 Edited by MasterDetective (840 posts) - - Show Bio

love Snyder and the Batman series

#8 Posted by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

.....and also,am i the only one who finds the costume,absolutelly the same as the Arkham Origins one?...

#9 Posted by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio

@punyparker: Nice thread dude.

@jayc1324 said:

My favorite series so far has been batman inc

Mine too. :)

#10 Posted by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio

Detective Comics Annual #2

Written by JOHN LAYMAN

Art by SCOT EATON and JAIME MENDOZA

Cover by ANDY CLARKE

On sale JULY 31 • 48 pg, FC, $4.99 US • RATED T

It’s a terrible, dangerous time to be a cop in Gotham City. At a time when police are being targeted for assassination, Gotham’s Finest also face a threat from within, as a shape-changing identity thief has infiltrated the GCPD and threatens to destroy it from within. Will he unravel the mystery behind this secretive killer before he loses any more of the few allies he has left on the force?

#11 Posted by entropy_aegis (15453 posts) - - Show Bio

The Wrath looks as if he would've made a great Iron Man villain.

#12 Posted by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

@rustyroy: I havent been following Detective Comics...is it only Batman,and is it in the Snyder continuity?

@rustyroy said:

@punyparker: Nice thread dude.

Thanks!

#13 Edited by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio

@punyparker: Yeah its only about Batman and his villains and its in the same continuity.

#14 Edited by sinestro_GL (3248 posts) - - Show Bio

I forgot that there was a Batman annual, so I looked up Batman Annual #1, and got pissed off again because it reminded me how much of a dickface Mr. Freeze is

#15 Edited by Breadspread (774 posts) - - Show Bio

I like the Batman Annual #2 cover by Jock. I lover covers that look good on a rack.

#16 Posted by Al_capOWN (535 posts) - - Show Bio

Did you guys enjoy more court of the owls or death of family?

#17 Edited by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

@al_capown: Court Of Owls.I was on the edge every month!

In Death of the family,i was dissapointed that Joker accually didnt kill anyone....

#18 Edited by lifeofvibe (3509 posts) - - Show Bio

@punyparker: i would have loved him to kill the whole godamn famly exept for jason and batman

#19 Edited by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio
#20 Posted by lifeofvibe (3509 posts) - - Show Bio
#21 Posted by Dark_Guyver (2359 posts) - - Show Bio

Cant wait for the 2nd issue of Zero Year!

#22 Posted by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

@rustyroy: Awesome stuff!.....but the guns.....what's that,Jak and Daxter?!

#23 Edited by Bezza (3719 posts) - - Show Bio

Which is the better series just now, Zero Year or Batman Incorp? Had a flick through both yesterday and can't make my mind up. The fight in the latest Batman Incorp is epic!

#24 Posted by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

So.....how did you like #25 ?!

#25 Edited by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio

So.....how did you like #25 ?!

Didn't read it, I dropped Batman after DoTF.

#26 Edited by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

@rustyroy said:

@punyparker said:

So.....how did you like #25 ?!

Didn't read it, I dropped Batman after DoTF.

Snyder is makin' great dtuff.....jump back on!

I admit i didnt like that in the DoTF nobody actually.....died!...but still there were consequences for the family....it drove apart,not trusting each other,it had an impact on Bruce,anyway.....it's no reason to drop the book!

#27 Posted by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio

Snyder is makin' great dtuff.....jump back on!

I admit i didnt like that in the DoTF nobody actually.....died!...but still there were consequences for the family....it drove apart,not trusting each other,it had an impact on Bruce,anyway.....it's no reason to drop the book!

Really, I'm reading the other Batbooks and it doesn't look like it had much impact on Bruce, anyways I'm not a fan of Snyder's run, maybe I'll jump back later but now I'm just waiting for Booch/Manapul's 'tec.

#28 Edited by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

THE BAT SIGNAL: SCOTT SNYDER BLACKS OUT "ZERO YEAR"

With Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo's "Zero Year" origin story in its second phase in the pages of DC Comics' "Batman," the year-long tale is focused on a total power outage created by a very public Riddler. But even as citizens and superheroes alike deal with the effects of the blackout across DC's "Zero Year" tie-in titles this month, things have become even more complicated with the release of "Batman" #25.

To shed what light we can on the story, CBR News spoke with Snyder for the latest edition of our regular discussion of the Dark Knight's world, THE BAT SIGNAL. The writer explained how the double-sized Red Hood issue from last month set up Batman's new mission as an inspirational hero, why the Riddler's power outage plan is much more primal and complex than it appears at a glance, how he and Capullo plan to remix classic elements like the Batmobile and the Batman/Gordon relationship in the issues ahead and why a wild string of murders will test Bruce Wayne like never before.

CBR News: Issue #24 of "Batman" kicked off the second phase of "Zero Year" with a double-sized installment. Was that story shape dictated because there was a gap in the monthly schedule for Villains Month?

Snyder and Capullo's "Zero Year" origin tale continues in this week's "Batman" #25

Scott Snyder: I knew I wasn't going to participate inVillains Month outside helping out with the "Riddler" one-shot -- not because I didn't want to, but because I knew I couldn't do everything else and that at the same time.Dan DiDio and Bob [Harras] and Geoff [Johns] all agreed that it would be better if I hung back and focused on "Batman," so Greg and I decided to take that month off to just focus on "Batman," to give #25 a more epic scope than a regular issue. We wanted to give a lot of room to the story, and I'm really glad we did. That issue is one of my favorites.

It also held some pretty significant twists to Batman's origin alongside some clever shout-outs to imagery from stories past. What did your take on the Red Hood/Joker origin need to do to set the tone for this phase of "Zero Year"?

It was about us announcing that we were doing a different take on the origin, and that required a new mission for Batman, in some ways. I wanted to set up this arc that really sets up Batman's purpose as defined against the modern fears and anxieties that we have today in cities across the country, about large-scale violence and random violence -- terrorism and the sorts of things that could be represented by the Red Hood Gang. We wanted to make Batman a counter force to that.

Part of the idea that sort of violence wants to engender -- if it has any kind of ideological stance behind it -- is to make us feel frightened to do the things that make us who we are. It makes you not want to go out of the house and just live your life. In a lot of ways, the Red Hood Gang is meant to represent a more generalized, horror version of that violence. It's not ideologically based, beyond being a philosophy for the Hood, which is him saying, "If you can die on a sunny Tuesday afternoon in a random shooting, then what's the point in anything? In fact, if you try to find anything that you want to invest into or consider a purpose in life, you'll go crazy." In that way, he's meant to be a proto-Joker, and then he finds, in Batman, a mission. He finds a counterpoint to himself. If that's who you believe the Joker is, of course. That might not be who the Joker is. You can kind of pick and choose your origin for him.

The importance of doing this first arc and reestablishing Bruce becoming Batman has to do with creating him as a figure of inspiration in addition to one of fear for criminals. I wanted him to be rebellious and sort of defiant. He gets his name out there and says, "If I can be this insane flying thing in the sky that you look up to see -- this weird, mad pinnacle of achievement -- then you can overcome your own fears and the fears being inspired by the Red Hood gang. You can get past the weird fears that Gotham imposes on us and get out there to become the kind of hero you want to be, deep down."

The Riddler's plans for Batman continue to unfold over the next several issues of "Zero Year"

It was important to establish that idea as a keystone of the series and show that this was a take with a different agenda than "Year One," which, again, is literally one of my two favorite books ever. The other is, of course, "Dark Knight Returns." For me, growing up in New York City, that's what the city was, the way it was portrayed in "Year One." It was urban decay and gangs and prostitution. You saw that in Times Square, we couldn't go to Central Park or any of that stuff. ["Zero Year"] is what we'd worry about as people living in Gotham, today.

The Riddler was introduced on-page in the backup feature for that issue, and two things immediately stood out to me about this version of the character. For one, his costume is much rougher than it was in the Villains Month special -- almost a proto-Riddler outfit. And two, Edward has gone right out and given his real name when he declared himself during the blackout. What do these changes signify for the kind of character we'll see across the rest of "Zero Year"?

Riddler is really a perfect antagonist for young Bruce because Batman first appeared in "Detective Comics." At his heart, at his core, that's what he is. He's like a souped-up Sherlock Holmes, with amazing gadgets and a cool car. In that way, what the Riddler is about at his burned down core is creating mysteries that have answers. He wants to make riddles that drive battles of wits. He poses the most simple questions to someone with an answer that's meant to be obvious, but the question misleads you. In that way, he's creating a maze or a detective challenge for Batman, and it cuts to the heart of his own pride. Is he capable or not capable of being the superhero he wants to be for Gotham? That really depends on whether he's smart enough to solve the riddles and the cases laid out in front of him.

That's what this is really all about with the Riddler. I'm trying to dig into the mythology and the folklore of riddles. You'll see a lot more of that in the upcoming sections of "Zero Year." We'll see why the Riddler has adopted the idea of the riddle as his emblem and persona. When you think about it, riddles in folklore are often tests of worthiness to heroes. You have knights come to castles and have to answer a riddle if they're going to get the princess. That question or riddle signifies a life or death challenge or someone's worth as a possible hero.

Well, in that case I hope you're fighting against the constant need to make Monty Python jokes.

[Laughs] Yes. Believe me, we're always resisting the urge to put in Monty Python jokes.

I wouldn't be that strong. In any event, this week saw the release of "Batman" #25, the first issue after the Riddler's massive power outage of Gotham. Some of the tie-in issues across the DCU have been playing with elements of that story hook, but what was important for you in setting up the main narrative? Did you want to skip forward in time or show the effects beginning to end?

Snyder and Capullo have plenty more to reveal about Batman's New 52 origin story

We're thrown right into it. The issue opens with a crazy Batmobile chase, so you're going to hit the ground running -- literally and figuratively. This arc is really two things. On the one hand, it has this big machinery plot-wise where the Riddler has challenged the city by turning it off. He's sent this surge through the grid and said, "I dare you to turn it back on." That's the first part of the riddle he's posing to the city. "Can you be smart enough to transform yourselves, or are you going to die?" Batman sees that in this section. He knows right away that this is not going to be a singular thing, where the Riddler causes the blackout and doesn't have anything else up his sleeve. He knows that this is part one of a multi-part attack, so he's creating a signal jammer to place in the grid because he assumes that the next attack will be electrical, too.

The other part of the arc is him solving this murder case as Batman, where he's up against the police. The case has to do with a bunch of Wayne scientists who are being killed in really, really gruesome ways by a mysterious figure. This case that's happening in the dark of the blackout has a lot to do with skeletons and bones, and the whole arc really is about the sense of Gotham reforming. Its bones are being reknit in ways that could be monstrous or viable. There's a sense that what it's really about emotionally, for Bruce, is, "Why does Batman fight alone? What is it at his core that keeps him shutting everybody out? Why won't he open up to Alfred, Gordon or anyone? Is there something holding him back from being the hero the city needs?" At its core, this all deals with Crime Alley and the mystery of what happens on the day his parent were killed. That involves Commissioner Gordon a lot, and you're going to see their relationship in a very different way for reasons that will be revealed across this section. I think it'll surprise people.

In the end, we're trying to do all this in new ways. What's the point in just revisiting stuff that's been done unless you're paying tribute to the past in a way that echoes it? In #25, you get the fun of a new Batmobile, which I think is totally bad as,s in a way you've never seen before because it's a young man's Batmobile. Then you'll see a moment in issue #26 that really pays tribute to "Year One," between Gordon and Batman, which really is a new take on a classic moment. You get those homages, but what's the point in retreading? It's all about reinventing it and making it more personal. With material like this, you definitely shouldn't be doing it unless you're willing to go all the way.

source

#29 Posted by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

Whoever gets hold of #26 first,post impressions!

#30 Posted by Dzhak (11 posts) - - Show Bio

Does anyone read Batman in digital format? I haven't read any of it yet and I'm wondering whether or not to make the digital jump. I read issue 15 which they gave away free on comixology the other day and I was dead impressed how well it worked with guided view. Would anyone recommend the whole series in this format? This isn't a general question of print vs digital as I've read both in the past, just wondering how this particular series works better.

#31 Edited by LordoftheNorth (1365 posts) - - Show Bio

@dzhak: It depends i do both most of the time

nothing beats a physical copy but digital is realy awsome for people like me travel alot

the only down sides to digital i can think of is that sometimes the prices for digital dont make sense like issue 25 of batman was the same price as physical one which was already over priced and horizontal pages just dont fit right thankfully with batman they dont come up that often

#32 Posted by Dzhak (11 posts) - - Show Bio

@dzhak: It depends i do both most of the time

nothing beats a physical copy but digital is realy awsome for people like me travel alot

the only down sides to digital i can think of is that sometimes the prices for digital dont make sense like issue 25 of batman was the same price as physical one which was already over priced and horizontal pages just dont fit right thankfully with batman they dont come up that often

Yeah, see I never thought I'd like Digital comics but I've been reading Thor in this way and am enjoying it. But I'm not sure about Batman. There's something sort of grainy and rough about the art which I feel might work better in print for this one...

#33 Posted by LordoftheNorth (1365 posts) - - Show Bio

@dzhak: Well for just Batman Greg Capullo's has a gritty feel to it but it is really easy on the eyes i have it on digital and i think its fine

#34 Posted by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio

Ok, I've read issues 21-23 (skipped 18-20) and its been a vast improvement over death of the family and also better than Court of Owls, although I have some problems with story so far its been a good read, specially the back ups, and issue 23, man that's the best Batman issue Snyder has written so far and the back up gave me chills! The best think about the series is that the art is more colorful than the usual Batman series. And Rafael Albuquerque should start drawing a Batman related series.

#35 Posted by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio

I also liked Riddler here, he genuinely seems like a threat here.

#36 Posted by LordoftheNorth (1365 posts) - - Show Bio

@rustyroy: ya all five seconds he has been in it

#37 Posted by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio

@lordofthenorth: 5 secs? lol I remember him seeing more than that, anyways so far he seemed more interesting than the bland Red Hood.

#38 Posted by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

@rustyroy said:

Ok, I've read issues 21-23 (skipped 18-20) and its been a vast improvement over death of the family and also better than Court of Owls, although I have some problems with story so far its been a good read, specially the back ups, and issue 23, man that's the best Batman issue Snyder has written so far and the back up gave me chills! The best think about the series is that the art is more colorful than the usual Batman series. And Rafael Albuquerque should start drawing a Batman related series.

Dude,The Court was a fantastic story.....that arc got me into Bats comics again.
About everything else,we totally agree.....i dig Zero Year very much,and can't wait for every issue to come out, every month,to see what happens next!....i want to see how the young Bruce is developed to be the Batman of..."Batman" and "Justice League"...

#39 Posted by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio

Dude,The Court was a fantastic story.....that arc got me into Bats comics again.

About everything else,we totally agree.....i dig Zero Year very much,and can't wait for every issue to come out, every month,to see what happens next!....i want to see how the young Bruce is developed to be the Batman of..."Batman" and "Justice League"...

I didn't mean Court was a bad story, I liked it, I meant that I'm liking Zero Year more than Court.

#40 Edited by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

@rustyroy: Im curious to see how the costume changes to the current New 52 one.......im sure Snyder will deliver.

#41 Edited by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio

@punyparker: I didn't like the costume at first but I do and yeah I'm sure we'll see that before this arc is finished.

#42 Posted by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

@rustyroy said:

@punyparker: I didn't like the costume at first but I do and yeah I'm sure we'll see that before this arc is finished.

Remember the first issue of Zero Year?....he was on the bike,with a torn up version of the New 52 suit,so....i think we will see the transformation,too.

You and me both.I didnt dig the suit but it is a prototype,and that is natural.......also the New 52 costume is awesome!

#43 Posted by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio

Remember the first issue of Zero Year?....he was on the bike,with a torn up version of the New 52 suit,so....i think we will see the transformation,too.

You and me both.I didnt dig the suit but it is a prototype,and that is natural.......also the New 52 costume is awesome!

Yeah I remember that and I didn't like the suit at first too but I kinda dig it now. Btw did you read any of the tie ins?

#44 Edited by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

@rustyroy said:

@punyparker said:

Remember the first issue of Zero Year?....he was on the bike,with a torn up version of the New 52 suit,so....i think we will see the transformation,too.

You and me both.I didnt dig the suit but it is a prototype,and that is natural.......also the New 52 costume is awesome!

Yeah I remember that and I didn't like the suit at first too but I kinda dig it now. Btw did you read any of the tie ins?

Other heroes comics?...no.
Besides,i only read Nightwing from other Bat-family books....

I only read them in DoTF cause....it directly involved the family!! :P

Even Selina got the Joker in her book,then....

#45 Posted by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio

Other heroes comics?...no.

Besides,i only read Nightwing from other Bat-family books....

I only read them in DoTF cause....it directly involved the family!! :P

Even Selina got the Joker in her book,then....

I didn't read the read any DoTF tie ins but I was thinking of getting AC, GLC and GA tie ins, I read Flash and 'Tec monthly so I already got those.

#46 Posted by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

@rustyroy said:

@punyparker said:

Other heroes comics?...no.

Besides,i only read Nightwing from other Bat-family books....

I only read them in DoTF cause....it directly involved the family!! :P

Even Selina got the Joker in her book,then....

I didn't read the read any DoTF tie ins but I was thinking of getting AC, GLC and GA tie ins, I read Flash and 'Tec monthly so I already got those.

Yeah,i only read Batman,Nightwing,first issues of Selina,but it got shitty,and JL(Johns) from DC.

Never interested in Lantern,Flash,Aquaman,ans others....

OH! i read the two Superman Unchained issues....Snyder!

#47 Posted by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

SCOTT SNYDER Explains BATMAN: ETERNAL Structure, Talks Bat-verse Changes

Batman scribe Scott Snyder doesn't want DC's new weekly series Batman: Eternal to be the least bit generic.

"We don't want it to be something you read and it just feels like a studio factory, churning out a plot," Snyder said.

Because of that goal, Snyder and the other four writers ofBatman: Eternal are each making sure they come at their stories from different directions — paying homage to a different corner of Gotham City, and a different genre or story approach from Batman's 75-year history.

And, he promises, there will be huge changes to the world of Batman during the next year.

Readers got a few hints about those changes in DC's recent "Happy Batsgiving" teaser image...

Snyder will be previewing some of those changes in a special one-shot edition of Snyder's monthly series in February. Co-written by one of his Batman: Eternal co-writers, James Tynion IV, Batman #28 promises to provide a peek into the future to tease what's coming for Batman in future stories. [Editor's note: Check back for more on that issue when we discuss it with Snyder next week.]

It's all part of a very busy year for Snyder, who's not only working on Batman: Eternal and Batman in 2014, but the recently launched title Superman: Unchained and the Vertigo seriesAmerican Vampire, which returns this spring after a short hiatus while he finishes up his current limited series The Wake. And just this week, Snyder announced he'll be launching a new Image series with artist Jock in 2014 titled Wytches.

But the writer is best known now for his work on Batman, and that doesn't look to change anytime soon, as this year sees DC celebrating the character's 75th anniversary in his several ongoing monthlies and the new weekly.

In a series of articles about Batman: Eternal, Newsarama has been talking to the various writers over the last few months as they detailed what they're doing to make their story arcs feel unique: James Tynion IV will be utilizing Tim Drake and Stephanie Brown, Ray Fawkes will be using Batwing and highlighting the horror side of Gotham, Tim Seeley will write a Batgirl adventure story, and John Layman will focus on the more colorful characters — particularly the villains — of Gotham City.

Now we talk to Snyder, who will be the first writer to contribute a story arc to Batman: Eternal. Over the course of the year-long story, the writers will set the stage for Snyder's plans for the Batman monthly in 2015. In the second installment of our conversation with Snyder about his upcoming work, we talk about Eternal and Batman proper and the changes to come.

Newsarama: Scott, walk me through the approach you guys are taking to the structure ofBatman: Eternal. Several of the other writers on the series have talked to Newsarama, and they've described how they're each approaching it with a really different point of view. How did that approach evolve?

Scott Snyder: When we first started thinking about how to do the weekly, with the options that DC originally offered, we figured we could do it one of two ways — we could either co-write each story so it had multiple writers, or we could do it so that there were different story arcs by each writer, whether they ran concurrently in the same issue — like five pages each — or in different arcs.

My thinking really was — and James' thinking too — was that it might be more difficult or tricky to do a series where each one of us is doing an arc that leads to the next arc, but we liked that idea. We liked that challenge.

Nrama: So you're each writing your own arc, separately, in your own style, right?

Snyder: Yeah, so I'm writing an arc, while the person after me is writing an arc, while the person after them is writing an arc. But you really have to know how they link up.

So we made a really, really extensive document that showed the whole story. Like, this whole, huge story. And the big moments that we really want to hit by a certain point are in there, so the document says, for example, by issue #5, this huge thing needs to happen, this big surprise.

And then another of our goals was to bring in four writers that we really trust and like, and that we're friends with, and have them come in and do arcs that are about their interest in Gotham.

So James, for example, really loves young characters. He loves peripheral characters. He loves the Gotham Gazette. He loves Arkham Asylum. He loves the characters that aren't necessarily always Batman. You know? In kind of that Paul Dini way, where his comics and the animated series would often focus on secondary characters, and given the emotional arcs while Batman was sort of this stable force in the thing.

Ray really loves supernatural elements in Gotham, and the darker stuff, the twisted stuff, from characters that I think people will be really happy to see return to some of the more magical elements.

Tim, on the other hand, I think really deals well with the deep psychological drama, and the creeping sense of dread, I think, with the suspense building between the bigger elements of the plot. So he's taking some of the more bombastic stuff.

And John really loves the colorful aspects of Gotham, and the villains.

So it became about, let's do arcs that focus on things that we feel are organic to our own interests. Let's not superimpose things on the writers. Let them do the stories they want. But these pieces have to move forward at certain moments, as either major parts of their story lines, or in the background, so they have this big plot moving for 52 issues as it rolls forward.

I'm really proud of that format. And so far — fingers crossed and knock on wood — it's been going really well. We're up to about issue #22 right now out of 52, written so far. So we're really, really proud.

That said, they're the first two issues of every three-issue arc. We have yet, all of us to write the third issue in the arcs that we're doing, meaning how they link up together. I mean, we know how they link up. But we haven't done that yet, you know?

Nrama: No, you lost me.

Snyder: Each of us is writing three-to four-issue arcs in a row. So I write one, James writes one, Ray writes one, John writes one, Tim writes one.

So it's like, issues #4 to #6 are James. Issues #1 to #3 are me. Like that.

So we're going from one person to the next person, like handing off a baton. Right?

Nrama: Got it.

Snyder: But, because you're writing them in order, when you're on the second issue of your arc, the next person is on the second issue of their arc too. So the third issue — or the final issue in each arc — is the one that passes the baton to the next person. So right now, we're at this great point where I love reading each arc, because we're two issues into three-issue arcs, or three issues into four-issue arcs. But none of us have written the issues that actually pass the baton to each other. So it's either going to go great and be incredibly smooth, or it's going to be this really big challenge to make sure it all works seamlessly.

So far, what I've seen is outstanding.

Nrama: So this structure really complements the approach where different writers are coming at it from very different directions.

Snyder: That's why we're really proud of it. We don't want it to be something you read and it just feels like a studio factory, churning out a plot. We don't want it to be like we're churning out one issue by me, the next issue by James, and it's all part of one, generic story, especially when we're working within Gotham, where you can really explore him from a lot of different directions through a lot of different characters, and still be writing a Batman story. We wanted each writer to get to do an arc that explores something that's to their interest in Gotham, because I think it will be a better series that way, honestly.

So we still have this huge, big, crazy-ass plot moving in the background — and in foreground, a lot of the time (in my arcs and in James') — but at the same time, we want everybody to get a chance to explore the characters in the neighborhoods of Gotham.

I'm really, really proud of it so far. All the issues I've read, and the way it looks like it's going to link up, arc to arc, based on our planning and the coordination (and to our editors' credit — Mike Marts and Katie Kubert), I really think it's going to come out great.

Nrama: And talking to the other writers, it sounds like it's quite an epic story that touches upon a lot of corners of Gotham.

Snyder: Yeah, it really is a huge, bombastic story that really does change a ton of things. It will really bend the mythology of Batman. I mean, from his core characters changing, his core allies, to the shape of the city — there are really, really big things coming for the series, that I'm going to play into in Batman and sort of dovetail off of when I come back [to present day in the Batman title, after "Zero: Year."]

Nrama: You mentioned that the story changes a "ton" of things, and from the "Happy Batsgiving" teaser, and the art you revealed from your February issue, they look like pretty drastic changes.

Snyder: Yeah, we're trying something different and pretty daring, but hopefully fun. The things that happen within issues, and the way the city has changed, and the way the mythology has changed, I think people are going to get really excited by it.

Nrama: Then as a last question about Batman: Eternal, obviously people are a little concerned about Nightwing. In teases, we've seen a blond person dressed as Nightwing, and we've also seen this female character in your tease for February who looks like a new Nightwing. Do these teases about these Nightwing type characters have to do with the end of Forever Evil in March?

Snyder: I can't say. I would love to tell you, but I think I'd rather just let you guys be surprised and have fun discovering it as it goes. I wouldn't want to ruin anything.

#48 Posted by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio
#49 Posted by PunyParker (11983 posts) - - Show Bio

@rustyroy said:

@punyparker: Found it.

Awesome.
I'll put my review of the issue here,Thursday,so it can remain "active"

#50 Posted by RustyRoy (13237 posts) - - Show Bio

Awesome.

I'll put my review of the issue here,Thursday,so it can remain "active"

Great. I'm sure with 4 different Battitles we can keep it 'active'. If I find something I'll post it here.