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"Elegy" part 1 of 4! A new era in the history of DETECTIVE COMICS begins as Batwoman is unleashed on Gotham City! Marked by the blood-red bat, Kate Kane is a soldier fighting her own private war – one that began years ago and haunts her every waking moment. With a script by Greg Rucka and breath-taking art by JH Williams III, you've never seen anything like this!

Featuring the debut of a new co-feature starring The Question written by Rucka! Odds against you? Alone and nowhere to turn? Willing to fight, but you don't know how? When you're searching everywhere for an answer, sometimes all you need to do is ask the right Question. Renee Montoya again dons the faceless mask to help those in need, all the while searching for her own answers in this new adventure with art by Cully Hamner (BLUE BEETLE).

Detailed Plot Summary

Batwoman takes over Detective Comics in the first issue of a four part story arc.

This issue starts off with a guy running away from Batwoman, who is sporting an all black costume with long red hair and red Bat, Belt, Gloves, Boots, and inner cape. She wants information from the guy she was chasing, he talks about a woman who will be coming soon and saying how they'll kill him for talking to her. She tells him she won't let that happen and urges him to whisper it in her ear. As this is happening apparently Batman has been watching and signals her to meet him on the roof of a building. They talk about covens of crime and about the Religion of Crime getting a new leader, how she's coming to Gotham. Batman tells her the case is hers and to do something about her hair because if someone pulls it the fight would be over. He tells her he'll be watching. As they both leave she heads to her bunker where we see that Her long hair is an attachment to her mask, concealing her civilian identity.

Kate Kane meets a woman who tells her that she's late to which Kate says she overslept. However, that doesn't fool the woman, who can tell that she hasn't even slept. She accuses Kate of cheating and eventually breaks up with her saying she doesn't want to be a rebound but that she really liked her and she asks her to call her when she grows up. We cut scene to Kate sleeping in her bed hearing her father going over the tapes from the previous night. He inquires about the conversation she had with Batman as Kate bench presses. Her father warns her about pushing herself over her limits, they have a slight fight about her taking it easy after apparently being stabbed through the heart. There is a glimpse of a woman being tied up but there is nothing further as Her father tells her "We soldier on." As they head to the bunker, her father gives her what looks like a gun telling her it's not yet field tested from apparently the army. He tries to get her to go out with him and her stepmother, but she refuses making it clear she's her stepmother and that she has other duties to take care of. We learn that this Religion of Crime has abducted Kate in the past and tried to cut out her heart. She learns of where and when they are coming but she doesn't know who. She tries to get the information by taking down some crooks but she gets nothing until the leader shows up, dressed in all white, powder white body, blond hair and red lipstick. We learn her name, Alice to which Batwoman pulls out her gun and aims it at her, telling her that she's been looking forward to meeting her as she shoots a bullet.

In the Second feature we see the adventures of The Question, Renee Montoya doing work in another country. She goes through looking for someone and eventually finds her way to a place that has nothing she was looking for, however there are some men approaching her, apparently about to fight.

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4.14 stars 4.14/5 Stars Average score of 7 user reviews

A surprisingly artistic and thoughtful addition to the Bat-family 0

 Even being a fan of Rucka's work, I was still a bit wary of a Detective Comics arc starring Batwoman. But from the get-go the progressive artwork and paneling and the solid story featuring a trippy new villain Alice dismissed any apprehension I felt when I picked up this issue. J. H. Williams III is one the greatest breakout artists in recent memory. His psychedelic panels propel the story fluidly and with a rejuvenating respite from the normal comic panels. He literally thinks outside the box....

3 out of 3 found this review helpful.
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