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A History of Violence begins with two hitch-hikers asking for a lift. The driver and his accompalice proceeds to shoot both of them, and steal their wallets. Both of the men arrive at Tom Mckenneys soda shop, and decide to rob it. During the course of their attemptd robbing, Tom shoots one of them with their own gun, and knocks the other out stone cold.

The domino effect of his vigilantism is a huge amount of media attention and being labelled as a hero, when all he wants is peace and quiet. The other effect of this is the public notoriety he gains. It draws the attention of an old mob boss (Torrino). Torrino begins to stalk him throughout the town with his large black car, and eventually comes inside the soda shop asking to speak with Tom. He does, and he implies that he knows something about Tom's past, to the annoyance of Tom's wife. He also brandishes toms missing finger, which he has kept in a small vial. He is kicked out of the shop by both Tom and his wife, all the while Tom insisting that he has never seen either of them in his life before.

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3.5 stars 3.5/5 Stars Average score of 2 user reviews

You can't run form it 0

A story about a man who can't run from his past.  A History of Violence, now turned in to a movie, is a crime story written by the man who created Judge Dredd (John Wagner).    The concept is cool.  The writing is just fine, but the story transferred over to the movie fairly well.  This book now becomes a comparison piece for those who do that kind of thing.  Vincent Locke's art is what sells me most about this comic.  I love the way he draws horror.  In this pocket-book sized original graphic n...

2 out of 2 found this review helpful.

GN Review -- A History of Violence / John Wagner & Vince Locke 0

Originally posted on my blog, The Comics Cove, not too long ago...I've been enjoying a lot of the graphic novels I've been led to read lately, and continue to be pleased that the sequential art medium has branched out so effectively beyond just superheroes for its storytelling successes. You can experience a graphic novel, in its way, as intensely as you do a "regular" prose novel, and walk away feeling the same sense of fulfillment from it. Such was the case with me when I finished with John Wa...

0 out of 0 found this review helpful.
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